TIBETANS IN NEPAL: THE LOST SANCTUARY

 

This piece by Maura Moynahan is an incisive, comprehensive and very disturbing analysis of what is happening to Tibetans in Nepal.  I would like readers to go through the section “Chinese Infiltration of the Exile Community” carefully, and reflect on how this “infiltration” has already begun to happen in other exile communities, Switzerland for example.  It is just a matter of time before other exile communities are undermined in this way. If you have a national policy that calls for Tibetans to give up their 3000 year old national identity and “reach out to our Chinese brothers and sisters”, you must expect confusion, division and even treachery within the populace.

http://www.rangzen.net/2012/04/05/tibetans-in-nepal-the-lost-sanctuary/

Comments

  1. DORJI | April 6th, 2012 | 4:04 pm

    how are so many boepas made into the worse agents of ccp? what is the typical conversion process?

  2. Ugen | April 6th, 2012 | 6:05 pm

    I don’t think there are so many Tibetan CCP agents from Tibet but we do know there are some Tibetan who are willing to sell information for some money, specially from Shugden followers. if we have huge profile databank, I think we can profile them. .

  3. Rewalsar | April 7th, 2012 | 8:07 am

    Indeed, it is a sad story, and is becoming sadder every day. As far as Nepal’s attitude is concerned, it is simply disgusting. It could handle the things in far friendlier way than what it really is doing.

    Nepal has one special record, and that is its evergreen sovereignty. It is said that Nepal has never been occupied by any foreign power. If it is true, then Nepal must be proud of this fact, and the very pride must reflect in their national policy. A sense of undauntable authority must manifest in their policy.

    Since some years, the Nepalese government is seen manhandling the Tibetans, to whom it has officially granted asylum. Certain Nepalese police-persons are seen indiscriminately thrashing Tibetans (monks, nuns, men, women and children), who are participating in peaceful procession to raise their voices against the Chinese misrule in their home land.

    Those Nepalese police-persons were seen thrashing the Tibetans with unusually long and heavy cudgels, using their both hands. Those cudgels are so heavy that some weak police-persons are seen staggering, when they brandish it ostentatiously in the air before allowing it to land on those Tibetans.

    It is pathetic, inhuman and shameful on the part of Nepalese, because what they have chosen to do on Tibetans is something any Nepalese farmer would refuse to do on their buffaloes.

  4. daveno | April 7th, 2012 | 10:44 am

    Nepal can now be called ” MA-CHIK NEE!.

  5. Darig Thokmay | April 7th, 2012 | 11:39 am

    It is very sad story to read !

  6. Darig Thokmay | April 7th, 2012 | 11:43 am

    Gen Jamyang Norbu la,

    Could you please change the font size of this blog. It is very hard to read,,,,,,,

    This is the second time that I have asked you this request ,,,,

  7. Tsunddru | April 7th, 2012 | 3:07 pm

    The last decade was one of celebrating Tibet: “In the light of celebrity patronage, museum openings, career opportunities, pop spirituality and New Age fashions. This is the Tibet that has captured the romantic fantasy of the West and which has drawn much of the interest that the Tibet issue receives at the moment.”
    This will be the decade for Tibetans living in the ‘SHADOWS’ to be brought to LIGHT, their stories dealt with Truth and given Justice.

  8. DAWA | April 7th, 2012 | 5:44 pm

    LETTER FROM WASHINGTONLETTER FROM WASHINGTON.
    by Richard H. Rovere
    NOVEMBER 11, 1950
    Subscribers can read this article in our online archive. (Others can pay for access.)

    InShare
    PRINTE-MAILSINGLE PAGE
    KEYWORDS
    Tibet; Bonnet, Henri; Thomas, Lowell; Pleven, Rene; Moch, Jules; Russia; Nehru, Jawaharlal
    ABSTRACT: Chinese Communist armies reported moving toward Tibet. Members of our State Dept. taking satisfaction in the discomfort this would bring Premier Nehru, whose moral tone has annoyed some of them of late. Doubts there is any cause for distress. Our government regards Tibet as the world’s least desirable military base. Excerpts from the Defense Department’s publication “Armed Forces Talk No. 348” in which are summarized all known facts about Tibet. No one knows how I large the country is; or the exact total of population, estimated from 700,000 to 4 million. There are only five known Occidentals in the country: 2 radio technicians, and 2 professional engineers; the fifth is “the British trade Consul at Gyangrse, who intends to leave as soon as arrangements are complete.” The only house with electricity is th Potala Palace, and the only radio set belongs to the 17-year-old Dalai Lama, presnted to him by American soldiers stationed in India during the Second World War.

    Read more http://www.newyorker.com/archive/1950/11/11/1950_11_11_085_TNY_CARDS_000225879#ixzz1rOfQAl3I

  9. MAURA | April 7th, 2012 | 11:38 pm

    UGEN – there are MANY Tibetans working as Chinese agents in Nepal and India and the west. In Nepal they are right in your face. In India, there are so many in Dharamshala and Delhi, Indian security officials are working overtime to protect HH Dalai Lama’s safety from harm. They are more and more visible in the West. Chinese agents have penetrated the poor, fractured Tibetan exile community for years – they have agents all over the Pentagon too. Let us not be naive about the enemy.

  10. Rewalsar | April 8th, 2012 | 3:08 am

    Unless and until Tibet is legally separated from China, all those unwarranted squabbles or backbite like comments on the Chinese policy over Tibet are not going to go anywhere. Anyone sympathetic to Tibetans or any state concerned about the China’s policy over Tibet must work hard to separate Tibet from China in the first place. Occasional lectures by some head of the states politely reminding China of human rights and religious freedom is (as it has always been) worth nothing more than just a ritualistic significance. Nothing is going to happen on the ground. China has already built strong military garrisons along the northern border. Whether or not the US considers such garrisons in Tibet something desirable doesn’t seem to have much that could affect the matter on the ground. The way the PRC beats its drum doesn’t appear to be dependent on how the US sings.

    With Tibet’s enemy, the age of dialogue is over. No compromise. Just fight and get back its lost sovereignty. The enemy does not understand the language of dialogue and compromise. The elite rulers of the “old Tibet” have a proverb, which they recite when they spank the naked buttocks of their culprits: “when dry words fail to communicate the intended message, the message must be conveyed with the help of stones and sticks”. Now is the time to act. Otherwise, what the enemy has claimed will prove true.

  11. Pema T. | April 8th, 2012 | 8:36 am

    @DARIK THOKMAY, almost all modern day browser gives you the option to increase the screen size. Font size can be increase by using a keyboard shortcut combination of Ctrl + (increase) & Ctrl – (decrease). The actual size is Ctrl + 0. Or View * Zoom in & Zoom out.

  12. daveno | April 8th, 2012 | 10:40 am

    So the bio war is the best option.First off to go are the PLAC members.

  13. Darig Thokmay | April 8th, 2012 | 10:45 am

    “Middle Path promotion society”, sited at Dharamsala is loudly shouting for a fast people’s gathering for re-focusing and re-informing the importance of their path.

    I have no idea how many people are truly following this path. But, young generations including large number of Tibetan college students across the globe are becoming impatience attitude of Chinese govt toward “Our Middle Path”

  14. Darig Thokmay | April 8th, 2012 | 10:49 am

    Sorry, I mean, college students are becoming impatience toward the attitude of Chinese counter part reaction on our “Middle Path”

  15. Ugen | April 8th, 2012 | 2:37 pm

    MAURA ,
    I am sure there are some Tibetans who are working for the CCP, no questions about it. However, I have to remind you that some of us are so judgement and narrow minded. When they disagree with someone, specially someone came from Tibet, they automatically labelled the person as spy. It happens in our communities very often. Until, 2008, be honest, there were some misperceptions and suspicious about Sanjopas. We should be careful how we treat our fellow Tibetans.

  16. Darig Thokmay | April 9th, 2012 | 10:54 am

    Dear Readers,

    Three Tibetans(Lung Tseten Dorjee, His Mother and Sister), who started their peaceful march from Dharamsala on 10th March 2012 and heading toward Lhasa with five points demands to China. They promised that they will never stop their march till Chinese fulfilled their demands in a proper way.

    Now, they are marching in Indo-Nepal border with Chinese flag in their hands along with Indian and Nepal Flags.

    So, there are very strong debates are going on on Tibetan websites Like :

    Khabdha.org

    Tibettimes.net

    See the following link to see his pictures:

    http://www.khabdha.org/?p=27930

  17. Darig Thokmay | April 9th, 2012 | 10:57 am

    Dear Readers,

    Three Tibetans(Lung Tseten Dorjee, His Mother and Sister), who started their peaceful march from Dharamsala on 10th March 2012 and are heading towards Lhasa with five point-demands to China. They promised that they will never stop their march till Chinese Govt fulfilled their demands in a proper way.

    Now, they are marching around Indo-Nepal border with Chinese flag in their hands along with Indian and Nepal Flags.

    So, rising Chinese flag in their march is very strong,,,,,see, hot debates are going on Tibetan websites Like :

    Khabdha.org

    Tibettimes.net

    See the following link to see his pictures:

    http://www.khabdha.org/?p=27930

  18. Puron Dorjee | April 9th, 2012 | 11:57 am

    Darig Thokmay la,

    This is family will be litmus test on China, let see how they respond at the Tibet border. Please read this article for more information. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/stephan-talty/what-the-dalai-lama-should-do-now_b_1392185.html?ref=buddhism

  19. MAURA | April 9th, 2012 | 8:57 pm

    DORJI – here is how it works – Tibetan agents working for the Chinese government initially approach an individual under the pretext of doing business. They will then reveal knowledge of intimate details of the person’s life history: education, profession, marriage, personal habits and interests, names and addresses of friends and relatives, in Tibet and in exile. Said a Tibetan thangka painter in Boudha: “They literally recite your life history, always in your own dialect, in my case, Shigatse. But if you’re from Lithang or Lhasa, the agent speaks in your native “key”. It definitely makes you scared. Then they open a suitcase filled with cash and jewelry as a “gift”, and offer free trips to Tibet, China, Hong Kong, anywhere you want, if you “join the cause”. I said my business was good and I declined to take the suitcase of cash. I could see the agent was angry because he failed. But now I wonder how many people have taken the bribe and now work for the Chinese.”

  20. Dorji | April 10th, 2012 | 4:24 am

    MAURA, thank you for your post. Do you know how it works if one says yes. What are the various tasks and reporting structure for these spies?

  21. Rewalsar | April 10th, 2012 | 6:05 am

    #18
    Stephan Talty’s “modest proposal” appears to be something very sensible. It seems that this idea is based on Mahatma Gandh’s “Dandi march”. Upon putting into practice the Dandi March, Gandhi managed to send a violent shudder that shook the very heart of British rule in India. This was a powerful movement, although it was not the only movement that eventually caused the British rule in India to crumble.

    The immediate former Kalon Tripa also advocated a similar idea, to which he named “Denpei utshug”. This Tibetan phrase connotes something like “no compromise until truth triumphs”. This idea as well appears to be very powerful, but it has not so far been tested, under this very banner. Stephan Talty’s proposal appears to be something that fits in well here (although one must not in any circumstance expect the Dalai Lama to walk personally, but of course the exodus and its leader(s) must fully be armed with his assurance and blessing).

    Such an event, if ever takes place, would mark the rebirth of the might and spirit of Bod kyi magpung, and of course the birth of modern Bod kyi magpung.

  22. PITBULL | April 10th, 2012 | 3:19 pm

    Thank you Maura for writting about this issue. i think china is very desperate. especially after the 2008 uprising. they are very much worried it seems. but like ugen said the public should not engage in the witchhunting of the seemingly usual suspects because it’s the wrong way to go about it, without any proof to point finger and gossip. and secondly we now know all kinds of unsuspecting people may be engaging in this kind of things. thanks!

  23. Christophe Besuchet | April 11th, 2012 | 5:40 am

    Rewalsar #21: This idea of the Dalai Lama marching back to Tibet was originally proposed by Lhasang Tsering in the mid-1990s, more than fifteen years ago, and again discussed in 2008, during the Olympics, when all the world media were turned towards China… Unfortunately, nobody listened.

  24. Rewalsar | April 11th, 2012 | 8:39 am

    23#
    Thanks for the information.

    “Easier said than done”; as this popular saying goes, it is not easy for anyone to come forward and say, “yes, let us do it, and I am going first”. However, the recent events that the world has witnessed in the Tibetan areas have shown the fact that there is tremendous courage in Tibetan people, and that if they once decide to do, they can and will do. They are daring devils. If there is anything in Tibetans that could alarm their enemy, it is this courage.

    So, one must not give up the hope that one day the world would witness an exodus forcefully marching back home, (non-violently) crushing any odds that come their way, and making their journey a triumph.

    It must be hoped that once the lava of Sinpo Dongmar’s blood begin to erupt, no force on the earth could decelerate its velocity.

  25. Puron Dorjee | April 11th, 2012 | 8:59 am

    Mr Christopher Besuchet la,
    Unrelated to your last posting, for sometime now I always wanted to say this to you incase I see you in person (it seem very hard, since we are far away) – Can you go to your own country President/Prime Minister/Premier/Chancellor/Parliament/House of Representative for full support of Tibet’s Independence which includes financial support to run CTA and also bring up resolution in UN repetitively until China is on verge to accept UN mandate for fair election of self determination in Tibet?

    If you can accomplish this, then whole Tibetans including CTA and HHDL will happily stand with you, otherwise please stop writing articles on Tibetan issues – you may be thinking of awaking us, but we are now awake for last 50 some years and many thousands of Tibetans traveled and seen world few times. I think your writings are sowing seeds of fracturing Tibetans in exile in coming fifty years – we do not want Tibetan Fatah and Tibetan Hamas.

  26. WANGCHUK | April 11th, 2012 | 9:35 am

    puron dorjee, what did christopher write that so offends you and Lobsang Sangay’s administration? Please bear in mind that we are in free world and can express what we feel. just as you can propogate pacifism for another 50 years other people can express different creative ideas to get the chinese to seriously consider some other possibilities. you seem like to be the one issuing fatwa. you think you are doing some great service by being this pacifist, this is exactly what china wants. all these spies that they trap basically have the job of dissuading tibetans from doing any activity of protests, demonstraions etc. well done!

  27. tashi2 | April 11th, 2012 | 9:55 am

    #26
    If Chris and you are so impatient to do the march to tibet,
    ask your Lhasang to lead it.
    why you guys alway squick while hiding in the bush.

  28. Puron Dorjee | April 11th, 2012 | 11:15 am

    Wangchuk la, Are you Mr Christopher B.? Don’t snoop to lowest protocol by name calling, even fools can do that.
    More over I wish I can issue fatwa – My first fatwa will make Chinese government to shell out 1 mil USD for every Chinese CCP officer or soldiers posting in Tibet and half mil USD for every Chinese family who wants to resettle into Tibetan area.

  29. Tsunddru | April 11th, 2012 | 2:53 pm

    Beijing’s ‘calling the shots’ in the onetime only Hindu kingdom & infiltration in the Tibetan community is alarming.
    Reminds of the Soviet /Eastern European communist era: all around suspicion; mistrust & paranoia ….. Neighbors & friends ‘telling on’ each other. The state keeping tabs on the spies ……

  30. tsering topgyal | April 11th, 2012 | 3:07 pm

    Puron Dorjee la

    What has Christophe written that has riled you up so much?

    The little that I know of Christophe is a person who believes in a Free Tibet,a person who has spent time,money and sadness on the question of Tibet,the beauty in Christophe is he sees hope of a better day,a day where our people can see His Holiness living in a Free Tibet alongside our people.

    What do you see?

    I look at Christophe and a few of our Inji brothers and sisters as the true children of Tibet.

  31. PITBULL | April 11th, 2012 | 3:20 pm

    I think what really riled up Puron Dorjee so much is Christopher mentioning Lhasang Tsering.

  32. Christophe Besuchet | April 11th, 2012 | 5:08 pm

    Puron Dorjee: How can I possibly request my government representatives to “fully support” Tibet’s independence if the Tibetan Government itself don’t want it…? You aren’t very serious, uh…?

    Tsering Topgyal and Pitbull: What irritated Puron Dorjee today are my comments (under the name Rangzen Chowkidar) on a facebook’s link posted by Jigme Ugen (http://on.fb.me/IgsGdv). It’s about a 2009 interview where the Dalai Lama made the painful admission: “I publicly accept failure of our [Middle Way] approach”, and Puron clearly didn’t appreciate my remarks — calling me “poor guy” as if this was going to provide depth to his argument…

    However, let’s not spend more time on this bitter exchange or on a march to Tibet led by the Dalai Lama (origin of my intrusion on this comments section). After all, we’re supposed to debate on this very important piece by Maura Moynahan.

  33. daveno | April 11th, 2012 | 8:29 pm

    Direct and indirect influence by foreign forces has become very sophisticated.Every country deploy diff.methods based on what would work. However, if you come accross such shitty bhoerig, take a picture if you cant kick his asrs ,if you can peel his skin off.

  34. Sangay | April 11th, 2012 | 9:04 pm

    Christophe la, before we begin to debate about Moura la’s yet another great piece, let me thank you for your unflinching support for our cause and undying love for Tibet.

    Your stand for Tibet may not align with His Holiness’s but the issue of Tibet is bigger than His holiness the Dalai Lama, and what you call for and write about absolutely fits into this bigger picture. Please keep doing the good work.

    Tibet was an independent country, but we lost our independence and we have one to blame but ourselves; and the reason we lost was because we didn’t have voices like the Christophe’s then who would awaken us from ‘Desi Golep’ mentality and make us think about how to secure our border and think about Tibet the nation first. It’s now over 50 since we lost our country and we are still asleep. Puron Dorjee says he’s awakened but he’s not only asleep but still carries that ‘Desi Golep’ mentality. Christophe next time hit us harder as my Mom used to say to my teacher when I didn’t do my homework. And if you see fit give us as shock I don’t mind at all. Bhod Gyalo!!!

  35. Adviser | April 12th, 2012 | 3:27 am

    Match the following middle path proponents.

    1. Old Monk———-A. Lobsang Wangyal
    2. Daveno————B. Mingyur Samkhar
    3. Puron Dorjee——C. Tenzin Nyinjey
    4. NewgenerationTB—D. Palden Kyap
    5. —E. Lobsang Sangay
    6. —F. Ten Deden
    7. —G. Lhaksam

  36. Sheila | April 12th, 2012 | 8:53 am

    With so many mainland Chinese spies also at work, it’s hard to figure out where the rest of the very sad security leaks are.

    Not long ago SFT was going to bring in a prominent speaker, and I found a post on our local CSSA (Chinese Students and Scholars Association) forum giving the exact details…he had attended the SFT meeting and/or gotten the meeting minutes, and (ironically) was posting the info in Chinese to his compatriots.

    It the SFT meeting and notes had been in Tibetan, he would have been out of business.

    Using Tibetan language much more often, for those who can, won’t stop the internal security problems, but it sure will cut off most of the outer ones. Then the internal ones can be exposed and addressed.

    At any rate, be proactive…spy on the spies. Search your local CSSA forums for “zang” and “zangdu” and “ZD” etc. Force them to retreat. Most of them are lazy and out to make a quick buck. If they have to actually get offline, get up from their video game couch to go meet with another anti-Tibetan personally, instead of chatting about their plans on a forum, many won’t bother.

    This doesn’t solve the problem we’re discussing n this article, but it does help expose it better by weeding out some of the Wumao types.

  37. Puron Dorjee | April 12th, 2012 | 9:34 am

    Christophe Besuchet: I’m dead serious; go to your government as Vice President of Switzerland’s Rangzen Alliance, lay down your grand plan and make sure when you leave, you have full support of Tibet’s independence, financial support to CTA & Tibetan NGO’s, and UN resolutions from your government. Take this in your hand, march to Dharmasala, India and you will get hero’s welcome and forever indebted.

    Few have asked why I posted my previous comment and question to Mr. Christopher B: Here is the reasons, if you Google “Christopher Besuchet” you will find following articles “Decapitated, then emasculated’ “Beacons of resistance, not desperate acts” “Lobsang Sangay’s wrong Churchill quote” “Some Truths about the Tibetan Government’s rebranding: Deconstructing official fallacies and disingenuous arguments”. Read all of these articles and then as a true Tibetan tell me what Mr. Christopher Besuchet is cooking for quite sometime.

  38. Christophe Besuchet | April 12th, 2012 | 9:53 am

    Puron Dorjee: Since you don’t seem to understand how things work, let me put it in simpler words. If anyone goes to his/her government and ask them to support Tibet’s independence, their first (and only) question would be: “Why the hell should we support independence if the Tibetan Government only wants autonomy…?”

    Does that sound clear to you?

    Oh, by the way, you forgot to list “Engaging in selective hearing” (http://bit.ly/HCKFj2). This one is quite relevant to our facebook discussion…

  39. Puron Dorjee | April 12th, 2012 | 10:58 am

    Christopher Besuchet: Similar to me, since you don’t seem to understand how things work, let me put it in simpler words: We Tibetan see China as our enemy, that’s where all of our ammunitions are aimed at. But, after reading most of your writings, your gun is aimed at CTA and HHDL, that’s what I’m trying to make you understand that you are very wrong.

    World history taught us that in a national dispute, multiple organizations within that nation have different aims and goals, but all of these organizations fought together without finger pointing or mud singling each other. Winner always fought like how bird’s feathers are uniformly stacked, holding nicely in their own place of hierarchy.

  40. Christophe Besuchet | April 12th, 2012 | 12:17 pm

    Puron Dorjee: What kind of history were you taught, bed time stories? Have you ever heard of France during the Second World War? Under German occupation, the French government thought it would be better to collaborate with the Nazis rather than to fight for freedom. But not all the French agreed — far from that — and a general decided to organize the resistance and retaliate. During these years of war, French resistance members had not only to fight German soldiers but also French collaborators — not with words but with guns — failing which the liberation of the country would have been impossible for the Allied forces. If I’m correct, history teaches us that they were pretty right to do so. Now, that France and Germany are today “good” friends is another story: France wouldn’t have been liberated from the Nazis, the Germans wouldn’t have had apologized, the Europe Union would simply not exist.

    Replace “German” by “Chinese”, “French” by “Tibetan” and “Nazis” by “Communists”: you should get a clearer picture of your own predicament and maybe understand why Dharamshala needs to be kept accountable.

  41. Rewalsar | April 12th, 2012 | 2:04 pm

    #40

    Ten Points!

  42. daveno | April 12th, 2012 | 2:44 pm

    Change is inevitable,so should our approach.

    If history taught us anything, its asking to Act based on the current prevailing circumstances.

    What worked yesterday might not work today.

    So take a phakpa or jaatee or tseetsee flu and placed those in jaaee cities.

  43. wangchuk | April 12th, 2012 | 2:47 pm

    puron dorjee @37
    I’m dead serious and disgusted with your attitude and how you just dont get it!
    you want to hear something? a friend who is in the inner circle of a high lama’s entourage told me that a relative of an ex President of America who is a student of the lama (i wont say the name)told him that if we really wanted independence, it should come from us first. nobody is gonna stick their neck out for and do that for us while we wanna play the good guy.

  44. Paul Argandona | April 12th, 2012 | 2:56 pm

    Maura is right, the Communist China has metastasize their global power to many puppet countries and Tibetan freedom movement is diminishing year after year. There have been so many sacrifices in and out of Tibet but Tibetans are lack of leaderships who can lead like Martin Luther, Gandhi and Mandela. Tibetan leaders like talking and commending but they are not practical.
    Tibetans need more practical. Nobody is going to help you if do not help yourself.
    Paul.

  45. Ugen | April 12th, 2012 | 4:38 pm

    once again, usually debates between rengzen vs non rengzen. can’t we talk about something else? just sick tired of all these talks, specially from rengzen crowds.

  46. tsering topgyal | April 12th, 2012 | 5:08 pm

    Maura has described in great detail how China has managed to control the ‘Tibet’ agenda in Nepal.
    On moral grounds we can all agree that Nepal has it wrong, on the question of Nepal losing part of their sovereignty by allowing China to dictate their internal affairs we can also argue that Nepal has it wrong.
    Where Nepal has it right is they do not have to give a damn as Nepal is a Free Country with no legal obligation to no one but itself.
    There are many reasons why we should fight for our country, but I would imagine that the lesson our people are painfully enduring in Nepal and in India having to live under the baton of others is another simple example of why we need our country to be Free.
    Please read this poetry and understand why we should fight for our land.

    Love of Country
    by Sir Walter Scott (1771 – 1832)

    Breathes there the man, with soul so dead,
    Who never to himself hath said,
    This is my own, my native land!
    Whose heart hath ne’er within him burn’d,
    As home his footsteps he hath turn’d,
    From wandering on a foreign strand!
    If such there breathe, go, mark him well;
    For him no Minstrel raptures swell;
    High though his titles, proud his name,
    Boundless his wealth as wish can claim;
    Despite those titles, power, and pelf,
    The wretch, concentred all in self,
    Living, shall forfeit fair renown,
    And, doubly dying, shall go down
    To the vile dust, from whence he sprung,
    Unwept, unhonor’d,

  47. DORJI | April 12th, 2012 | 6:07 pm

    we need to cut the head of the dragon. That s how Soviet union collapsed. That s how algerians got their freedom from France. The head of the colonialist state must fall. Gorbatchev was the man in Russia. De Gaulle in France. In France, if not for De Gaulle, factions of the army was ready to kill every algerian if needed ( french killed 1 million algerians in a few years out of 7 millions, and pledged to continue to the end). The head must fall. we need to accelerate this change! we need to crack that f… internet wall and incite every chinese to have the right feeling about their government. if the head dont fall, we got no hope as i see it: nobody gonna help, and the same head wont change).

  48. DORJI | April 12th, 2012 | 6:44 pm

    this what the head fears: the so called “subversion”. That the words spread like wildfire, because they know, consciously and instinctively that the shift of opinion is their end. And all ppl that work in that subversion even outside china, but with effect in china, will at first be in danger of death. Falun gong activists in USA who tried to crack the golden shield vanished or got beaten up badly by ccp agents IN US. that s what we have ahead of us if we start touching the real sensitive nerves. So be it.

  49. Ugen | April 12th, 2012 | 7:39 pm

    Dorje has good points, a practical solution, at least,something we can try beside these usually mumbo jumbo slogans. it is so fool to think that western government supports us if we choice the rengzen path.
    this is the reality now, both rengzen and the middle pathers don’t have any practical solutions beside usual useless slogans.

    I kind of like the ideas to learn from Falun gong activist, at least, they have some understanding how the ccp works and some experts on the great firewall in china.

  50. Sheila | April 12th, 2012 | 11:03 pm

    རྒྱ་སྐད་འདོར་བ།

  51. Dorji | April 13th, 2012 | 3:37 am

    I think we should send a “Manifesto” to the chinese populace, the masses, and reach as many as possible. THe how to do it is a technical issue, but the message is the substance. This Manifesto could be jointly written by tibetans, uyghurs, AND chinese. Telling the truth about their regime, deconstructing the lies of CCP, showing the perspective forward and the illusions of prosperity for all they use as bate to stay in power. Talking about all their kind who are in laogai and why. And the alternatives to that!

  52. Ugen | April 13th, 2012 | 6:52 am

    SHEILA ལགས།
    ལྟ་ཚུལ་དེ་དངོས་གནས་འཐད།ང་ཚོས་ངེས་པར་ཏུ་བོད་ཡིག་བེད་སྤྱོད་བཏང།བོད་སྐད་བཤད།བོད་ཡིག་གི་ཐོག་ནས་ལས་ཀ་བྱས་བ་ཡིན་ན།རྒྱ་མི་རྣམས་ཀྱིས་མི་གོ་བ་མ་ཟད།བོད་ཀྱི་རིག་གཞུང་ཡང་རྒྱུན་འཛིན་བྱེད་ཐུབ།ཡིན་ནའང་ད་བར་ཏུ་མང་པོ་ཞིག་གིས་ཤགས་ཁོ་ན་བརྒྱབ་ནས་འདུག།དེ་ལ་ཕན་ཐོགས་ཅི་ཡང་ཡོད་པ་མ་རེད།ད་འདི་རེད།བོད་ལ་འདི་ལྟ་བུ་དཀའ་ངལ་འབྱུང་གིན་འདུག་མོད།ང་ཚོས་དུས་རྒྱུན་ལྟ་བའི་སྐོར་ཅིག་བརྩད་ནས་བསྡད་ཡོད་པ་རེད།
    DORJI ,
    I think it can be done if we change our focus bit, from international campaign to inside Tibet, I strongly believe that we can drive out the ccp from Tibet.

  53. Sheila | April 13th, 2012 | 8:19 am

    Dorji lag, how about an “audio manifesto” as well? Have someone read it Tibetan, Uyghur, etc. Like Shapale it could spread like lightning in the form of a mp3, or maybe even a short video featuring a Tibetan, Uyghur and Chinese person, each speaking in their own language, to show solidarity.

    The written version could be in the form of a jpeg so the text can’t be searched; encourage each recipient to change the name of the jpeg befor forwarding it so that the filename can’t be blocked as easily.

  54. Sheila | April 13th, 2012 | 8:30 am

    Hmmm…there are the other ethnicities and nations to consider too. Mongolian, Zhuang, Hmong etc. Millions of so-called “minorities” experience similar extinction under the CCP.

    I’m not sure how many languages are still strongly used, but it would be really powerful for each group of people that still feels strongly about their own language to hear and read the manifesto in their own tongue.

  55. Sheila | April 13th, 2012 | 9:16 am

    Today’s VOT mentions the spy issue: http://www.vot.org/

  56. Joe Hamilton | April 13th, 2012 | 9:30 am

    Great piece Maura ! Also a great chance to laugh at the ridiculous efforts of Pure Liar Dorjee to divert attention from the topic..I wonder why ??? As far as Tibetans doing the dirty work for the chinese…it´s a fact !

    I have had two of them as guests in my home, played the “poor refugees” here in Germany for years to then come to my place, staying the night as our guests, only to get up in the middle of the night and try to attack my then 14 year old daughter in her bedroom.

    Due to the integrity, intelligence and true belief in His Holiness the Dalai Lama, of my daughter ( that goes for the other three too ) did this attack fail. She pulled the picture of His Holiness from her little altar next to her bed and spoke to both of them telling them that if they don´t immediately leave the house her father…ME…will kill both of them !

    And believe me I would have ripped these arsholes apart, slowly and deliberately !

    After this incident there are only a handful of Tibetans that I would ever let stay at our place.

    We later found out that these CUNTS are not refugees at all but hold chinese passports !

    Another indicator for me are those Tibetans that demonstrate in front of chinese asshole buildings for years but still get visas to visit Tibet !

    I wonder how that works ???

    So most of the Tibetans in Exile can kiss my arse because I have never met as many liars and cheats before I got into this in my life.

    Which will of course not stop me supporting genuine people and the true Tibetan Cause which is inside Tibet and not in Exile!

    But as everyone knows I am highly motivated to stick to the truth , anything else would bring shame on myself and those others unwilling to flinch when it comes down to the nitty gritty !

    And Miss Pure Liar Dorjee…you are one of those fools that can kiss my scottish arse. A worthless specimen,shameful and obviously not interested in moving forward.

    But that seems to be LS´s tactic too so at least leave His Holiness, who has retired, out of your weak argumentation !

    PS…those two cunts with the chinese passports were two of the strongest Middle Way supporters here and regularly slapped down Tibetans that wanted to take some real action !

    So instead of Middle Way supporters blasting Rangzen people at the drop of a hat, maybe they should start cleaning up their mess first and have a close look who and why certain people are the loudest within your own ranks !

  57. Dorji | April 13th, 2012 | 9:57 am

    Sheila,
    since i dont have tib character set on my work computer, i had to unicode by unicode map to letter..which i have done because ur sentence was so short. Not sure what exactly was your idea with that sentence, but on your last 2 posts: yes there are definitely several ways to virally spread such a manifesto. I dont want to go on here about these ways though. If it d touch the masses, I believe it could be a historical milestone and eye opener, or “brainwashed opener”. I m not sure about including all minorities though. quantity of stakeholders can dilute the message in my opinion. Plus the other unhappy minorities would anyhow profit from ccp criticism. There could be like u suggested also an audio version, especially for all the illiterate chinese once it would be talked about and illiterate ppl/chinese would be curious of it.

  58. Rewalsar | April 13th, 2012 | 10:22 am

    To be honest, one must say that the minority cultures and languages in the PRC (except that of Manchu) are to some extend looked after. For example, the best contemporary writers (in Tibetan language) are trained inside Tibet. And they are quality writers at the international level. One may say that this kind of heritage preservation undertakings is nothing but a piece of propaganda show. It may be true, but what is visible cannot in any way be denied point blankly. So thinking that the minority languages are almost out of use might need a second thought. A proper survey must be made in those areas, before any debate is called for.

    The issue must not be whether or not the PRC is good to Tibetans. The issue must be the sovereignty, Tibet’s sovereignty, which the PRC has held up in a broad day light, and the world nodded in agreement. This must be the issue. As long as Tibet’s sovereignty is under the PRC’s custody, China is Tibet’s enemy, no matter how much progress China might bring in Tibet. China may distribute each Tibetan a piece of gold as big as a sheep’s head, but that cannot and must not be anything proportionable.

    It seems that the definition of “Tibet Issue” has to be written down in clear text, so that there remains no room for any misleading interpretations. Tibet’s sovereignty is the issue, and that is what the majority of Tibetans understand it to mean. Sovereignty is not exchangeable with material progress, nor is it with emotional support. China may fill Tibet with its fatherly or motherly love, but that must not be the issue.

    Never before anywhere in the world have people seen such a serial of “self immolation”, running to a line of 30 individuals. Those who set themselves alight has one thing in their mind and that is Tibet’s sovereignty.

    Now, China must understand why Tibetans are not happy. They are not happy because the way China treats them is like: someone bringing a pair of shoes, when ask for a hat.

  59. Tsunddru | April 13th, 2012 | 10:24 am

    Moyra Moynahan’s piece on the situation in Nepal is in-depth and heartfelt.
    It seems some of the basic information gathered by ‘spy agents’ in KTM Nepal is the timing and venue of the protests as deduced from this other shorter ‘piece’.

    http://www.economist.com/node/21550315

  60. wangchuk | April 13th, 2012 | 3:48 pm

    Joe, very sorry to hear about that incident. your daughter seems very brave and smart. those people are beasts. i dont care if they are tibetans. doing that to a very young girl and that too where they’re enjoying your hospitality, thats the lowest of the lowest. i’m quite shocked.i really cant get over it.

  61. Adviser | April 13th, 2012 | 5:32 pm

    Tashi Phuntsok, Lhamo Kyap and Tsering Chodrup who are all staunch middle path proponents roam here frequently for diversionary purposes. Diva who visits here from Kathmandu is Kalsang Phuntsok Godrukpa.
    Joe, you should have charged them for an attempt to harm, rape and murder your daughter who was also a minor. It shouldn’t be too hard given your well resourced life.

  62. Christophe Besuchet | April 13th, 2012 | 5:48 pm

    The following Al Jazeera documentary is quite relevant to Maura’s great piece, even if the first part deals mainly with the Kingdom of Mustang:

    http://aje.me/HPE3vw

  63. karze | April 13th, 2012 | 7:50 pm

    There are sizeable Tibs from Swiss who attend Chinese New Year gala organized and sponsored by Chinese embassy in Swiss.

  64. Joe Hamilton | April 14th, 2012 | 4:44 am

    @Adviser At that time our priority was just not to lose our calmness and that´s why we didn´t get the police involved. On top of that, nothing really happened so we had the feeling that these assholes were out to provoke something. To make a big fuss publicly ” Tibet supporter raises charges against Tibetans ” would maybe have been exactly fulfilling their mission.

    Now we all know what goes down at almost ALL the parties in the scene. Thinking back, one of these guys was known for always being involved in arguments and fights.

    I believe this is one of the tactics that they use.

    So if you have someone in your community that is constantly causing trouble, look closer and maybe you´ll find out that the guy just doesn´t have a problem with holding his drink !

  65. Soten | April 20th, 2012 | 4:28 pm

    I could not believed Dr Sanggy said that ” we Tibetan never have a country”. If we don’t have a country what we are fighting for? why we elected you as a top minster? I am really hopping you be careful answer to any question in the future. Of course, I am not discourage your work or insulting your political carer. we believed your strong education background and courage and future leadership.
    We freely elected you as a our future leader and we put you lot’ hope. We will continues to support you everything we could, at the same time, you must learn from made mistakes and take a full responsibility as a “one country’s” top minister lead your people right direction. Remember Your words are so important for our future where we at. Please think twice before you answer to any question in the future.
    Remember we love you and we are with you always, we will get back our country together near future.
    From Shegatse Tibet

  66. Sheila | April 26th, 2012 | 9:45 am

    China is fast becoming (is already?) a corporatocracy; what if we put more focus on corporations, as opposed to the government? Or more likely, along side government work?

    We can wait forever for the US Congress, for example, to do this or that, but why not just skip past that impossibly-slow system (no offense, guys, but, you know…) altogether and put huge emphasis on both American and Chinese corporations, if in fact both of those have as big a part to play in Tibet’s fate as it seems they do.

    How big a part did economics play in the South African Anti-Apartheid movement, and the Polish Solidarity movement?

    I think companies react more swiftly to change than Congress does. What companies do business in Tibet and Nepal and India? People often say it’s impossible to boycott Chinese products, but firstly, it’s not impossible, and secondly, even if it’s difficult it may well be worth the effort.

    Secondly, how could we influence Chinese corporations, specifically, that are destroying Tibet–mining companies, for example? Although again I was thinking more of boycotts, sugar in gas tanks comes to mind. Would the world forgive Tibetans for industrial espionage or would that damage the cause overall? Things are so desperate now–does it matter what the world thinks any more? Or can we at least launch a massive worldwide boycott of Chinese precious metals, as was done against South African diamonds?

  67. Sheila | April 26th, 2012 | 9:47 am

    Also an academic boycott could have a huge effect–one reason being that so much espionage is actually conducted by PRC teachers and students living temporarily abroad.

    Here’s the South African academic boycott:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_boycott_of_South_Africa

  68. Sheila | April 26th, 2012 | 9:52 am

    Sorry for the three-fer (as usual), but I should add that academic boycotts can obviously go awry; would the US during WWII, however, have allowed German professors and students to come and go freely? Why should Chinese professors and students, with a proven habit of spying on Americans, be allowed this freedom?

  69. daveno | April 27th, 2012 | 8:17 am

    Corporation/Government/Individual = Most of the time are on survival mode trying everything disposal to increase their net benefit.Why are most tibetan surprised when they first landed in the corporate culture of selfish pattern that are not rather visible from outside.
    We give what others would consider treasure for FREE,there is nothing left to bargain. Good for the soul but does not really help to deal in human level.
    Be selfish and fock the others when it is of national interest.

  70. Rewalsar | April 28th, 2012 | 6:40 am

    “Tibetan problem is Chinese problem” says a Nepalese leader (#62). And they put undue control over the everyday life of the Tibetan refugees, who have by now been living in Nepal for over 50 years. When they try to stage peaceful demonstration against the China’s rule in Tibet, the police indiscriminately beat them with two metre long cudgels. The government ordered to close down the Dalai Lama’s office. And many more bans and conditions to make their everyday life uncomfortable.

    Nepal surely is not going to become rich overnight by sacrificing Tibetan issue, as people do to the sacrificial victims at Dakshinkali.

    High class motor-able roads and high-tech wide gauge railway lines may appear and connect Kathmandu and Beijing. High speed trains and sparkling vehicles of (made in China) latest model may run day and night in between these two cities. However, these new developments will definitely carry deeply chiselled Chinese trademark, which symbolically and silently stand as the epitaph in memory of the savagely silenced Tibetan issue.

  71. Sheila | May 2nd, 2012 | 11:39 pm

    We were talking here recently about some kind of manifesto or message to disseminate inside Tibet; just received this obituary of an old family friend who passed away last week at 98 years of age. She was a missionary with my grandparents in China back in the early days (1930s and ’40s), and was able to return multiple times after that, including shortly before her death:

    “In preparing for one of these trips, she discovered she could buy some inexpensive solar-powered audio players. She packed as many as she could and gave them to villagers who had no electricity, along with The Bible in Living Sound. Because of a significant donation, more than 110,000 MP3 sets have been distributed in China.”

    I’m wondering how she managed to smuggle in 110,000 sets! I don’t know which specific devices she imported, but here’s a solar-powered mp3 necklace:

    http://www.dealextreme.com/p/solar-powered-mp3-player-necklace-1gb-13661

  72. Sheila | May 2nd, 2012 | 11:46 pm

    So you can get a 1Gig for about $14 (buying around 50 units). If you buy more units, the price goes down.

  73. tenz | May 5th, 2012 | 1:47 am

    this article without doubt is one of the most accurate portrayal of trials and tribulations faced by tibetans in nepal. most of us who are born and brought up in nepal doesnt even have a valid documents (rc). so crossing into nepal from india during our winter vacation is an arduous journey that involves tactical method and a little bribery. tactical in the sense , most of us act like local nepali and if lucky we could evade the eyes of border police and if unlucky and spotted by some of those guaurds we have to pay some money. up until now , it was worth it , becuase we are living a free life in nepal. but now it seems things are different. crossing is risky and dangerous because u could be deported or jailed. and nepal isnt the place it once was. most of us who work or study in india have to think twice or thrice before visiting nepal !!!!!!!!!!!

  74. isa | May 6th, 2012 | 5:26 am

    pedantic- if not pointless- titivation: marvelous maura is moynihan, not moynahan.

  75. tsering dorjee | May 7th, 2012 | 10:59 pm

    @ISA
    Are you talking about your own point or about the article itself? If it is about the article, would you mind elaborating it a little bit.

  76. pasang | May 8th, 2012 | 12:11 pm

    ISA @chinese engineer. how you got the nerve to come back?

  77. palden tso | May 9th, 2012 | 10:52 am

    read many times . it is so sweet

  78. Soten | May 15th, 2012 | 4:24 pm

    I am from inside Tibet and here in Tibet our lives are getting tougher and tougher day by day. Our culture, languages and customs are become invisible every moment. I do not know what situation in out-side Tibetan community. I have few questions for all of you.
    What we should do in order to keep our Identity alive? what is the most important strategy do we have? Seems me relationship between Our government in DharamsaLa and Chinese Government are getting worsen and worsen, do you think our non-violence policy will work? if not, what is the next plan? Do you know what is Government of Chinese’s policy to Tibet within the next 10 years? Have you ever evaluated that the movement occurred in Tibet? Are there any differences between different year’s movements? If you did what it tells you?
    If you could answer these silly questions, i will appropriate at same time i really apology my very ugly English.

  79. Rewalsar | May 16th, 2012 | 12:29 pm

    What we should do in order to keep our Identity alive? #78

    Make sure that one eats tsampa, remembering the virtue of which this blog had published a long entry last year.

  80. samdup | May 18th, 2012 | 3:15 am

    hello Jamyang Norbu la,you are one of the important Tibetan writer whom we look forward to read and know,,, but it seems you are no longer in our readings now a days, because we don’t get your writings in Tibetan(translated). Sir we are really looking forward to your writing, so please do quench our thirst. will be waiting sir…i have also heard from my friends from Tibet that they also get to read your writings if its in Tibetan.

  81. Sheila | May 23rd, 2012 | 7:56 am

    Dang. Can’t we get some more IT people for Phayul, or is the DDoS attack just that intense? No offense to existing geeks – I realize you’re up against it!

  82. jigme | May 23rd, 2012 | 2:44 pm

    read here laude Arpis blog
    http://claudearpi.blogspot.com/2011/02/lies-plants-and-damage-control-karmapa.html

  83. Shiwa | May 27th, 2012 | 8:57 pm

    hello,
    Jamyang Norbula how have you been? we haven’t got any new article from you. we exicited to hear from you.

  84. Tenam | June 5th, 2012 | 10:59 am

    sorry to take up space here but why is “phayul” forbidding us to go to message board? china already forbidden us from our phayul now the owners of phayul website also doesnt care (as long as they get money from the ads)or are they incapapble of fixing the problem?

  85. lhagyalo | June 6th, 2012 | 11:57 pm

    too often we witness people misusing the forum, consuming our energy and time for no obvious reasons. what better have we acheived since its conception until its unexpected demise? whether the current state of that website’s forum is a result of hactivism or deliberate moderation from the admin, we ought to move foreward and broaden our thought that’s more result-oriented for our community and humanity as a whole. that’s forum is gone but this site is still online as of my commenting but what better are we achieving. are we not witnessing its slow demise too like English magazines of our community? First it was Rangzen English Magazine of TYC, followed by Tibetan Bulletin, Tibetan World, Tibet Today, and now Tibetan Review becoming a bi-monthly. God. We seriously need a media expert to fix this drastic mishap.

  86. TPR new forum | June 22nd, 2012 | 7:54 pm

    RE # 84:

    Tenam la, my guess is that Phayul’s message forum is still under Chinese DDOS attack.

    But I see that TPR has just started a message forum that you might want to try.

    It’s at: http://www.tibetanpoliticalreview.org/discussion-forum

  87. Darig Thokmay | June 23rd, 2012 | 8:20 am

    Gen Jamyang Norbu la,

    It seems like ages since you wrote your last piece in last April. You may have no idea how disappointed or boring it is to visit a website,which is left for months without any update !!!!

    I knew you like to play guitar but don’t forget your pen !!!

  88. sangay | June 24th, 2012 | 2:18 am

    Dont be impatient!
    Im sure JN la is not well. I hope that he gets well soon.. Lets pray for him.

  89. tingmo | June 24th, 2012 | 6:43 am

    Maybe this guy is figuring out how to transport these pages into facebook. Or maybe he is just disappointed that current kalon tripa is taking everybody by storm in facebook. Either way, it seems this guy is overwhelmed by the power of facebook.

  90. Tenpa Dhargyal Gashi | June 24th, 2012 | 12:41 pm

    @Darig Thokmay, don’t worry, he will be back soon enough. He was just caught up with a lot of things recently – rangzen related and other things of that nature and thereby the seemingly absent landlord phenomenon. He will be back soon.

  91. Dawa | July 2nd, 2012 | 12:21 pm

    JN is busy in India…

    http://www.khabdha.org/?p=30805

  92. Thubten | July 3rd, 2012 | 9:27 am

    Jamyang la, I too miss a lot of things without your updates. I think this is the time you come up with your ideas as to how to deal with the present Tibet situation.

  93. sonamtopga | August 23rd, 2012 | 1:58 am

    The police brutality unleashed on poor Tibetans is unparalled beyond all imagination; peaceful prostetors are beaten mercilessly with heavy cudgels landed anywhere on the body including the head and on numeral occasions limbs were broken and then hauled up in the police vehicle and thrown into prison without any medical attention whatsoever. Nepal has become the far outpost of the Chinese Government, entrusted to teach the Tibetans a brutal lesson; it seems the Nepalese authorities and its state machinery are without conscience when dealing with the peaceful Tibetan protestors; it also seems that United Nations for human rights and plethora of other international organizations both governmental and non-governmental, are ineffective or lack the political will power to pressurize the Nepalese Government to change its behaviour.

  94. jigme | October 12th, 2012 | 1:26 pm

    http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2012/s3607238.htm

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