“TIBET’S NEXT INCARNATION?”

 

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CONSTITUTIONAL CRISIS, CONFUSION AND CONSPIRACIES AT THE CENTRAL TIBETAN ADMINISTRATION

For some months now, large-scale protests and violent street battles have been raging throughout Cairo and other major cities of Egypt. Thousands of Egyptian liberals and secularists have come out on the streets to protest what they called President Mohamed Morsi’s “power-grab”, after he issued a declaration awarding himself new powers, which he claimed were “temporary” until a new constitution was put in place. Morsi’s opposition will have none of it and claim that he wants to make himself “the new Pharaoh”.

The exile Central Tibetan Administration (CTA) has since last year been going through a major constitutional crisis of its own. The odd thing in Dharamshala’s case is that no one there appears to have realized that anything consequential had happened at all. It is perhaps likely that some of the more savvy residents of the exile Tibetan capital had their suspicions but were too intimidated or confused to say anything, much less stage a protest at the Gangchen Kyishong square.

I only got my first inkling of this “crisis” when I came across this reworking of the title of the Tibetan prime minister from that of “kalon tripa” to “sikyong” an older and somewhat obscure title used by the old regents of Tibet. But I assumed this name change was merely a cosmetic one. Samdong Rimpoche had some years back changed the title of the exile PM from the traditional si-lon to the more grandiose sounding Kalon Tripa or the “Enthroned Kalon”*

So I assumed, as everyone else did, that the change from Kalon Tripa to Sikyong was also just a change in the Tibetan name and that the office of the prime minister remained the same. In an official report issued on September 26, 2012, by CTA on its website it was also made clear that only the name or title of the office had been changed:

“Kalon Tripa Dr Lobsang Sangay today ratified the recent amendments made to the Charter of Tibetans in Exile to change the official title of Kalon Tripa to Sikyong.”

But in the last paragraph of the report there was a hint that perhaps something more than a name change had actually taken place: “His Holiness the Dalai Lama said on 8 August 2011 that he was handing over the political leadership that he inherited from Regent Tagdra Rinpoche to Dr. Lobsang Sangay, the first democratically-elected Sikyong or Tibetan political leader.”

In effect the Dalai Lama was handing over his power as sovereign monarch, which he had received from the Tagdra regent, to his prime-minister, who in effect now became the next sovereign, monarch or head of state. In his own  official Twitter profile Lobsang Sangay la gives a description of what a “Sikyong” actually is, and he makes it clear that it is more than a mere change of title or name.

“Sikyong – the democratically elected head of the Tibetan people and political successor to His Holiness the Dalai Lama”

Public memory is short so I think everyone should remind themselves that Lobsang Sangay la was elected on 26 April 2011 as the kalon tripa or the prime-minister of the exile government. That was it. Nothing more, nothing less. Just a prime-minister, or Kalon Tripa if you like.

In a parliamentary system of government the prime-minister is the head of the government only. In such a system the head of the nation or the state – or the head of the “people” in our situation – would be a monarch (as in the UK or Japan) a president (as in India), or in our own case before His retirement, the Dalai Lama.

Where an executive branch is led by a person who serves as both head of state and head of government, that person is usually elected and titled “president”, but can also be an unelected monarch. If you combine the power of the head of government and the head of state, as it appears to have happened in the case of the “Sikyong”, then you have a president, as in the United States, Venezuela or Kenya.

So at the bare minimum there has been a profound and fundamental change in the Tibetan political system. And the strangest thing is that there has been absolutely no real discussion in the cabinet, the parliament or among the public about this major alteration in the administration. Of course, this is not to say that the Tibetan people cannot or should not change their political system if they so wish. But even in a nominally democratic country such a fundamental change to the political system would require numerous and lengthy parliamentary and public debates, and ultimately a national referendum.

In our case the national discussion on whether we were going to change from having a having a prime-ministerial to a presidential system,  should have taken place the before the Dalai Lama’s actual retirement. But this never happened, not then, not now, and probably not anytime soon. What is truly depressing is that there has been no public outcry, not a single voice of protest and not one editorial or article in any exile journal condemning this absolute disregard for democratic procedure. Everyone, it seems, is going along with the polite fiction that only “the official title of Kalon Tripa to Sikyong” has been changed as the CTA has claimed in its press release.

Speaking of protests, the powers that president Morsi “temporarily” awarded himself which triggered the demonstrations that have practically crippled Egypt, are essentially far less radical or profound than the changes that have been made surreptitiously to the Tibetan body politic. Morsi claims, with some justification, that his changes to the system were made to avoid interference from a court system that was largely a holdover from the Mubarak era, and which had overturned many efforts at reform since the Revolution.

So in what direction is the exile political system now headed? Is the role of the “Sikyong” equivalent to that of a “president” or even a “Supreme President”, as some of the Sikyong’s supporters are beginning to call him? Can we expect “Supreme Leader” or “Beloved Leader” next year? Since this transmogrification is now a done deal, should we perhaps resign ourselves to the new reality and hold our peace? And even if we did, is this change really all that simple or clear? For instance, in his claim that he is the political successor to the Dalai Lama the Sikyong seems to be stating that his role as leader is more profound and far reaching than that of a merely elected official, even that of a president.

The beginnings of what might be called a cult of personality appears to be forming around Tibet’s new “supreme” leader. His visits to exile communities in the USA and elsewhere have been heralded by motorcades of Black SUVs and security personnel in dark suits and shades, more suited to heads of superpowers or major criminal organizations than the head of a refugee administration whose funding is derived largely from charitable donations from the West. The representative of the Office of Tibet in New York has also made the fawning declaration that the “number one” priority of the new Tibetan administration was to raise the international profile of the new exile political leader.

The Sikyong himself appears to have sipped a little of his own Kool-Aid when he suggested to an Australian journalist that the self-immolations in Tibet had somehow been inspired by his election victory. He also, quite possibly, sees his own role from a heroic, perhaps even quasi-messianic, point of view. He told the same reporter that he had taken over the “hardest phase” of the Tibetan struggle:  ‘”If you study any movement, the beginning is swift and brutal,” he told The Herald yesterday. “In Tibet’s case, it was the Chinese invasion. And the end is swift and pleasurable – look at the result of the election in Egypt. But the middle phase is always the most difficult.”

Clearly our Sikyong has not studied the Indian independence movement where the conclusion – partition – was probably the most traumatic phase of the entire struggle, nor even the recent Egyptian Revolution whose ending far from being “swift and pleasurable” is daily deteriorating into street violence and chaos. For those taking the actual lead in our struggle, those courageous self-immolators and political prisoners in torture-chambers and Laogai camps throughout Tibet, there can be no doubt that this is the “hardest phase”. But it is not appropriate for the Sikyong, or any of us living in the free world, for that matter, to describe our own modest contributions to the cause, in such momentous terms.

We might get some idea of the direction in which the Sikyong mythology is heading from the sub-title of a documentary film being made by two European filmmakers, Christian D.Paehler and Maren Strenge.  The project appears to have the approval and support of CTA and shooting in Dharamshala seems to have been wrapped up. Lobsang Sangay is referred to in the title as The Outsider but more interestingly in the sub-title asTibet’s Next Incarnation?”. No objections or controversy has come up about this very suggestive sub-title, so perhaps we can conclude that this has been officially approved and blessed.  This sub-title (even with the question mark) suggesting that Tibet’s new-found democracy could revert to a theocracy of some kind, is not at all reassuring.

Shooting of THE OUTSIDER: TIBET'S NEXT INCARNATION at Dharamshala

If the Sikyong is “the political successor to His Holiness the Dalai Lama” and he might furthermore be “Tibet’s Next Incarnation” as his officially approved biographical documentary appears to suggest, then we are in a far deeper constitutional cesspit than if the change were only one from prime-minister to president, which though problematic enough, does not carry with it the many theological questions (and perils) inherent in a system that is based more on metaphysical than on constitutional principles.

In such an event a host of questions will have to be answered before even the first steps can be taken to deal with the issue. What is the exact constitutional role of this “Political Successor to His Holiness the Dalai Lama”?  Must this Tibetan leader be acknowledged as an “incarnation”, as he seems to suggest he should be?  Is he the manifestation of the “Madhey Trulku” option that His Holiness the Dalai Lama mentioned some years ago, where His Holiness would manifest an alternative emanation before his own passing? If so, then would it not be sacrilege to even suggest term limits for such a political incarnation? Would the public have to regard him as a “supreme president for life”? Would we have to address him as His Eminence, or His Serenity or even His Holiness? Would we have to conduct a search for his reincarnation on his death? And so on.

It is astonishing that someone with a doctorate in law from Harvard should have gone along with such makeshift – make it up as you go along –  constitutional arrangements for the top leadership position of an entire people, even if at this moment in their history the Tibetan people are stateless and powerless.  Surely, as I suggested earlier, a “national” debate even a  referendum of some kind could have been conducted for the exile public to decide on what system of government (parliamentary, presidential, theocratic etc.) their newly elected leader, should head. Yes, His Holiness the Dalai Lama did make the initial suggestion for changing the Kalon Tripa role to that of a  “Sikyong”, but I am sure he would not have disapproved of a national debate and referendum on the subject. He is on record for insisting (on a number of occasions) that the final decision on fundamental policy issues must be made by the Tibetan people, and not by Him.

This misinterpretation, even deliberate misuse of the Dalai Lama’s suggestions and statements is the source of another major constitutional crisis in Tibetan society right now, creating an unnecessary and potentially malignant division within the exile community.  On September 6th last year, eleven Dharamshala based political factions and coteries (from the religious right) gave a press conference at the Bhagsu Hotel where they condemned the Tibetan Youth Congress (TYC) and “some individual Tibetans” for “hurting the Dalai Lama’s feelings” by accusing Him of closing down the government-in-exile. These groups were behind the so called “public” demand for  shutting down the Tibetan Youth Congress. They have also issued threats of violence to “individuals” in Tibetan society known for their pro-independence views. “However, when questioned by reporters, the NGOs said they did not have any direct evidence that the TYC had made any statement to this effect, but rather that they were referring to a speech made by His Holiness the Dalai Lama” (on August 3, 2012 at a teaching in Ladakh).

This incident is just the tip of the iceberg. In fact there appears to be a ratcheting up in Dharamshala of efforts to marginalize, demonize and possibly even force the closure of all Rangzen based organizations. The adoption of this divisive and desperate strategy by the Tibetan leadership is probably a reaction to recent developments in the Tibetan political scene that have begun to erode public faith in Dharamshala’s signature national policy.

The game changing development in this regard has been China’s complete and unambiguous rejection of the Dalai Lama’s Middle Way Approach. The abrupt resignation of the Dalai Lama’s two top negotiators to Beijing, who in their statements hinted at the hopelessness of their task, also underscored the the abject failure of that policy.

In the exile community the Tibetan Youth Congress escalated its various campaigns for independence, organizing a series of Rangzen conferences world over, and was also partially successful with a hunger strike in New York at the United Nations on March 2012. Another development in exile society in 2012 was the formation of the Tibetan National Congress (bhod gyalyong rangzen lhentsok) with a mandate to pursue the ultimate goal of restoring a sovereign, independent and democratic Tibetan nation state. In 2013 the celebration of the centennial of the Great 13th Dalai Lama’s “Declaration of Independence” by exile Tibetans world-over, signaled a definite and positive shift in the Tibetan public’s understanding and appreciation of the Rangzen struggle.

But without doubt the most significant and powerful developments came from inside Tibet. The self-immolations intensified towards the end of 2012 and the beginning of 2013. In addition to their call for freedom and the return of the Dalai Lama to Tibet, more and more self-immolators openly called for Tibetan independence and separation from China.

Sangye Dolma, 17, set herself on fire on 25 Nov, 2012, at Dokarmo. The message on her hand reads "Tibet an Independent Nation"

To stem the rising tide of public enthusiasm for the Rangzen cause, Dharamshala appears to have adopted a two-pronged strategy. The first is to attack Rangzen advocates as both “hurting the feelings” of the Dalai Lama and “creating divisions” (what Beijing calls “splittism”) in Tibetan society.

In its March 10 statement this year, the Tibetan Parliament-in-Exile warned the Tibetan people not to resort to speaking, writing articles, and propagating information without any sense of responsibility and instead to direct their efforts at achieving “the common desires” of the Tibetan people. “Common desires” being their euphemism for the Middle Way Approach. Earlier the Sikyong had condemned some unnamed people who, “either knowingly or unknowingly”, were creating divisions among the Tibetan people.  Speaker Pempa Tsering similarly attacked “baseless claims made by a small group of Tibetans causing distress to His Holiness the Dalai Lama”. Other cabinet ministers as Gyari Dolma had also publicly condemned critics of the establishment.

In October of 2012, Thomtok Trulku, abbot of the Dalai Lama’s private Namgyal Monastery, on a tour of the Tibetan communities in Minnesota and New York, denounced those advocating  ideas contrary to the Dalai Lama’s wishes. Much to the surprise of his listeners he also spoke out against Tibetans celebrating the Centenary of the 13th Dalai Lama’s Declaration of Independence. He said that such celebrations would cause distress to the Dalai Lama. The young person from Minnesota who phoned me about this was quite upset: “I thought all Dalai Lamas were the same person.”

The other prong of Dharamshala’s anti-Rangzen strategy has been to create an environment of misinformation around the Dalai Lama, especially regarding statements and activities of Rangzen advocates, and in doing so hopefully provoke His Holiness into issuing statements against them. Vigilant observers of the Tibetan political scene will have noticed that although the Dalai Lama has completely retired from office, he is always surrounded by the Sikyong, ministers and officials even during his religious teachings and various mind-science or peace conferences round the world. All this following Him around is, of course, a means of gaining and maintaining access to His Holiness at all times, and subsequently being the first to put in a point of view whenever anything happens or is discussed. The flip side to this maneuver is denying your political opponents any or all access to the Dalai Lama.

When I was editor (1993-1995) of MANGTSO (Democracy), the largest independent Tibetan language paper, I regularly requested interviews with His Holiness which were regularly denied. This was at a time when any Indian or international newspaper or magazine could get a personal interview for the asking. It is so depressingly simple, these two essential lessons in Tibetan politics: gain and maintain your access to the Dalai Lama, deny all access to your enemies. And these two lessons seem to be as valid now even after His Holiness has retired from office, as much as when he was in.

I have absolutely no doubt that it is all this sycophancy and manipulation that is behind the anxiety, even alarm, that His Holiness now feels towards Rangzen advocates about whom He is being incessantly informed regarding their alleged activities undermining His political legacy. It is such misinformation  that has caused him speak out against the Tibetan Youth Congress and “individual Tibetans” advocating independence, and perhaps even for his unfortunate remarks at Mundgod supporting Libby Liu’s outrageous expulsion of Jigme Ngabo from RFA.

On 29 March 2013 at a teaching at Salugara in North India, His Holiness expounded in great detail on the incomparable merits of the Middle Way Approach and how its implementation would bring about peace and economic prosperity inside Tibet. He added that advocacy of independence, though,  was “closing the door” for establishing contact with China, thereby subverting His efforts at negotiation.  His Holiness stated that the Middle Way Approach would furthermore bring benefits to “400 -500 million Chinese Buddhists” and even spread the Buddha Dharma, particularly Tibetan Buddhism throughout China as had happened in the past. He made no direct reference to the self-immolations and only hinted at the failure of Dharamshala’s dialogue efforts with Beijing, but he insisted that he had “full confidence that it (the Middle Way Approach) will produce results in the future.” At the conclusion of his talk he stated emphatically that “Most importantly, the Tibetans in Tibet continue to put their trust in me and to place their faith in me. Similarly, the Tibetans in exile put their trust in me and place their faith in me.  So I retain a responsibility.“**

His Holiness is, of course, correct in his assertion that his people continue to place their faith in him, but the second part of the remark that He “still retains a responsibility” can clearly be read to mean that He “still retains ultimate political power” in the Tibetan world, especially on the issue of the Middle Way Approach, where He appears to be suggesting that no change in policy would be tolerated.

If such is the case and that if “two years” after the Dalai Lama’s retirement Tibetans cannot have an open and frank debate on the success or failure of His signature national policy, it makes the whole claim of exile Tibetan democracy a bad joke. It also gives credence to China’s repeated accusations of the Dalai Lama’s insincerity and dishonesty. A Wall Street Journal report mentioned that “China has dismissed the Dalai Lama’s retirement as a ‘trick’ designed to impress the international community.”

The rationalization of this particular statement of the Dalai Lama, that I have already begun to come across, as being just the personal opinion of an individual Tibetan, and thereby just an expression of His democratic right to free speech, is not only disingenuous but deeply and disturbingly dishonest. Even in his retirement His Holiness has political powers, relatively speaking of course, that the president of a democracy can only secretly dream about. For instance the concept of Him being “All Knowing” (thamche-khenpa) is one held literally by nearly all his followers. Any attempt to question this can result in one being labelled an “unbeliever” and having mobs of fanatics howling for your blood. Hence there can be no real democratic debate on any subject if His Holiness insists on contributing his viewpoint.

I feel that it is absolutely important for His Holiness to understand that his true political legacy – in an ultimate sense – is not the Middle Way Approach or even his advocacy of non-violence for which he received the Nobel Prize. His true legacy, one for which he will be gratefully remembered by His people, is his introduction of democratic governance to exile Tibetan society, no matter how limited or flawed it has been, as I have described in some of my previous writings. It is also my sincere belief that the future Tibetan leadership and even the kind of society that the democratic process will bring about, will have the knowledge, skill and dynamism to eventually ensure the successful resolution of the Tibet issue. It is hence important for His Holiness to make sure that his legacy of democracy is not discredited and that His idée fixe, the Middle Way Approach, does not become the principal cause of its failure. The decision to step down from power was, of course, entirely His Holiness’s own. Nonetheless, retiring from the position of supreme authority He had held his entire life might have been for Him a little unsettling in the beginning, and the cause of some anxiety and even a second thought or two.

No less an observer and analyst of the human condition than William Shakespeare has, in his great play King Lear, laid out the difficulties that could arise when an aging but strong-willed sovereign (who is also not a very good judge of character) steps down from  political power. Those readers who have not seen an actual performance could watch the DVD of the play produced by the Royal Shakespeare Company, or even Akira Kurosawa’s magnificent cinematic rendition of it in Ran. There are some significant differences in this interpretation, though. You could , of course, just sit down with the Complete Works and read the play.

One of the more compelling characters in King Lear is “the Fool”, Lear’s court jester who is absolutely loyal to his master and accompanies him faithfully on his wanderings in a wild countryside during a violent thunderstorm. He is eventually hanged, or so we are given to understand, since he does not appear in the second half of the play. In spite of this, George Orwell in his essay “Lear, Tolstoy and the Fool” insists that “The Fool is integral to the play. He acts not only as a sort of chorus, making the central situation clearer by commenting on it more intelligently than the other characters, but as a foil to Lear’s frenzies. His jokes, riddles and scraps of rhyme, and his endless digs at Lear’s high-minded folly … are like a trickle of sanity running through the play”

Old Tibet being a medieval sort of place like Lear’s Britain, had, in place of newspapers and TV, its jesters, singers and versifiers who “spoke truth to power.” During the 13th Dalai Lama’s reign there was the minor official “Kisur-la” with his biting satirical verses. We had opera performers who poked fun at important Tibetan institutions as the state oracle and the clergy, and water-girls (monlam-chuma) who sang songs ridiculing the corrupt and powerful.  In that capacity, I suppose the author of this blog and those regular commenters on it serve such a useful if  humble function as the Dalai Lama’s personal “Fools”.

Of course, I speak for those of us sufficiently clued-on to contemporary reality not to be taken in by Dharamshala’s pernicious mummery yet still old-fashioned enough to keep faith with His Holiness. However, we should be aware that another generation of Tibetans activists, intellectuals and leaders are coming to the fore who would like to move beyond the realm of court-jester’s, eunuchs, sycophants or even incarnations, no matter how attractive and romantic these roles may have once seemed. Generation Y Tibetans want to take their place in a true democratic future where even the most all-knowing and all-powerful can be questioned or critiqued, as a matter of course, without the mob or the Inquisition butting in.

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* The Kalon-Tripa title might have been a subliminal expression of Samdong Rimpoche’s unrealized academic/ecclesiastical ambition. The highest rank that a Gelukpa lama or monk can aspire to is that of the “Ganden Tripa” or Enthroned of Ganden”.

** Translation of His Holiness talk at Salagura by Tsering Wangchuk la, TSG Liaison & Press Officer.

Comments

  1. Tenam | April 22nd, 2013 | 1:33 pm

    Thank you Jamyang la for this éclairage on the recent name-change and other problematic issues that the exile system seem to be getting entrenched in, slowly but surely. Another issue is the lack of checks and balances by the legislative branch on the executive branch. They seem to be just working together to consolidate their own ‘power’ and shield themselves from accusations rather than working towards building and improving our exile system.

    Tenam

  2. The Owl | April 22nd, 2013 | 3:50 pm

    “China has dismissed the Dalai Lama’s retirement as a ‘trick’ designed to impress the international community.”

    While I hate to agree with anything sadistic China has to say, the blurb above, unfortunately, hits the bull’s-eye.

    As I have taken pains to reiterate for as long as I can remember, like a Fool shouting at deaf people, that the pro Marxist Kundun’s lip-service, “Democracy”, as JN rightly pointed out, is a “bad joke”, and not a very funny joke either. This most excellent foppery, this is the Dalai Lama’s doing, the God-King: That blind priest, like the eldest son of fortune, turns what he list: make mockery the very ideal of Liberal Democracy.

    “Tibet’s next Incarnation”–The Dalai Lama has stated before that his incarnation could be elected by us, his credulous people. This makes perfect sense in the light of made up tulku system, which can be legitimized however He wants to enforce obedience; be it by, dream prophecy, roll of dice, throw of bones, oracle mumbo jumbo, lottery or election: whatever does the trick. The madness need no method when pulling the wool over a culture of critically lazy, superstitiously acquiescent, gullible sheep.

  3. old monk | April 22nd, 2013 | 4:18 pm

    JN, a pragmatic question for you. will you prefer a humble, weakling like tethong who won’t be able to command the awe and respect and loyalty of the public, or someone decisive, potent, and who somehow, by hook or crook, try and manages to get things done, despite crossing some forbidden lines?

  4. old monk | April 22nd, 2013 | 4:25 pm

    history of the world reveals that in all circumstances of instability,weakness and choas, only the strong,decisive,controversial,power-loving and pretty thick-skinned leaders manage to drag forward,or sustain, the collapsing spines of the nation. Prudish, rule-bound, and unassertive leaders, despite their intellect and moral strength, fail to command their own minister or even capture the spirit of the public. The become a personality-devoid store manager that no team member respects and listens, because of which the whole business slags. when that happens, his modesty is no defence or excuse- it is a failure.

  5. rangzen doma toronto | April 22nd, 2013 | 4:31 pm

    jamyang norbu and maura moynihan smells same.. both gets money from some organisation to criticse our his holiness and tibetan govt in exile.. or both have personal problem wid L.S ..go to hell Jamyang norbu n maura..I will b d saddest on d earth, if we ´ve 2 rely on dogs like both of u for tibetan cause..i beliee in RANGZEN, BUT seriously i wud rather b chinese THAN 2 believe jerk n whore like u n maura..

  6. nima | April 22nd, 2013 | 5:46 pm

    Jamyan la…CTA is only good to confuse Tibtean people…..be very care ful some confused Tibetan might not like this article. ….as for me ur article was eye opening. Thank you …from Toronto

  7. Gyendun | April 22nd, 2013 | 8:47 pm

    I feel a little uncomfortable with all these very grand and royal receptions taking place lately.
    Fawning over the arrival of an elected official is creepy even done by school children, but when it’s adults in costume, it is just a little too close to crossing into Dear Leader territory.
    The Kashag itself should discourage these overly festive and celebratory greetings, especially in light of the grim situation inside Tibet where our people are being sent to prison for simply sharing a photograph of a self-immolation. Maybe there can be a celebration dance for the Sikyong at Losar, at Tsuklakhang, in Dharamsala, maybe. But not at train stations and airports around the world please. It’s just not how democratic societies behave.

  8. The Owl | April 22nd, 2013 | 9:16 pm

    rangzen dolma toronto, it would be a refreshing change for once if people like you(the pro Dalai Lama, “I am a proud Buddhist” type) can critique what JN wrote with cool headed objectivity and articulation rather than triggering the usual default defense mechanism of reflexively hurling “F” bombs and ad hominem, just because you feel hurt and outraged.

    Take comfort in the thought that…

    If the infallible Dalai Lama really is a God as most Tibetans fetishize, why then, His detractors will suffer unimaginable torment in Hell for all eternity. You should relish such divine justice, savour the schadenfreude instead of getting all pissed off and lose your cool with those irreverent skeptics who dare question sacred cows.

  9. ng | April 22nd, 2013 | 10:00 pm

    @Jamyang Norbu’s politics of cynicism and deception through his pens. Another additional reason is, the defeat of his aristocratic cousin. At end of life, once a superficial rangzen warrior, given into to his true color….the color of insincere person with a syndical mind. I would like to see if your kids will call some monks to perform death ritual for your body….certainly yourself invited the Drepung Monks from Atlanta when you mother passed away. It was the time when you were condemning Tibetan Buddhism on the pretext of your political awakened mind.

    NG

  10. tsering dorjee | April 22nd, 2013 | 11:08 pm

    Why are we doing this reception with such pomp and show, with each city trying to compete for the most grandiose reception ever, as if that will truly highlight Tibet’s tragic circumstances? I doubt even H.H has received such grand reception with multiple black limousines in the past and his would be justified as not only the head of the Tibetan people but also as a world leader. I doubt my settlement can compete with the western countries. We can probably afford few ambassador cars and few motorcycle parade. If going around the world in style is the called leadership, then I would like to be the next dear leader and I would like to have extra bodyguards like Gaddafi, made up of female goddesses. That would make me look even better promoting women rights too.

  11. The Owl | April 23rd, 2013 | 1:23 am

    I am dubious about the “cult of personality” surrounding the Sikyong as JN alleges. If you search “Lobsang Sangay” on Youtube, his videos (and only few of them) garner no more than few thousand hits, far less than JN related vids.

    While I don’t know about the “number one” priority, nevertheless, I don’t see anything wrong in attempting to raise the international profile ans stature of our PM. How is that a bad thing for the cause of Tibet?

    Black SUVs, security personnel in suits and dark shades. who cares-I personally think those grand receptions are kind of a nice gesture and a public relation boon—especially that one in Paris where Doctor Lobsang Sangay was warmly received by 300 Tibetans singing and dancing at an indoor Train station packed with tourists and Euros.

    Even though I never voted for the man, I can see that many Tibetans are proud of him, and they should be, he is way better than that idiot Samdhong Rinpoche. (though Sangay isn’t as impressive as Kalon Dicky Chhoyang imo, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RHgELE5ZzLc
    she should really run for the Sikyong position next time around.)

  12. tsering dorjee | April 23rd, 2013 | 3:24 am

    It is too much, dude. It seems like we are trying hard to overcompensate for something. Target things that are more important and give them more time. Now each community orgs are keeping an eye on others and trying to outdo them, which is a total waste of time and resources. I am not saying he shouldn’t be treated like a VIP, which he should be, just don’t make it Justin Bieberish – and in a cultural sense it feels more like a caricature than the real thing. But I agree that he is at least better than Samdong Rinpoche who makes outrageous statements one after another and then claims he is misquoted. He is still partly running the show from the shadows by the way, senting Lobsang sangyi la around the world more like the Foreign minister, which demotes Dickyi Choeyang to Press Secretary and so on.

    Dickyi Choeyang won’t because Lobsang Sangay will be still there. But if she runs, then rangzen candidate will have a great chance with the middleway votes split down the middle. Go for it, Dickyi Choeyang. Woman power!

  13. Tenzin | April 23rd, 2013 | 4:01 am

    Thought provoking article, thank you for sharing. Personally, I feel, no matter how long it might take to reunite with our brothers & sisters in Tibet. I am willing to wait (in exile) and would happily die with the hope that my great grandsons will be enjoying that moment in Tibet and thereafter ever since.
    Middle Way Will prevail. – Jai Jagat !

  14. Joe Hamilton | April 23rd, 2013 | 4:53 am

    Another to-the-bone piece and another opportunity for independent thinkers to see that not all is lost and not all are deaf and blind in a Cause that is being sold as a successful one when in fact it is one of the biggest failures that has ever been in the history of mankind.

    Even these days when the call from Tibet has never been so loud and clear, the spin doctors and their cronies refuse to allow the obvious truth.

    Divide and rule.

    Squabble and distract.

    Sell and be sold.

    As a non Tibetan I find it repugnant that an honest, intelligent Tibetan like JN is constantly attacked by other Tibetans for speaking his mind.

    As many non Tibetans have made a fortune, grabbed power,found full time jobs or at least finally found a place to exist within the Tibetan Cause, the very same people bow down non Tibetan parasites.

    Although a million reasons due to hundreds of fake non Tibetan NGO´s buying and selling TIBET, there is almost no discussion and zero attacks on these people.

    The opposite is the case. They are thanked because they contribute to the chaos that is the very foundation of this dishonest mess.

    Everything is allowed in this FREE FOR ALL except the TRUTH !

    Keep going JN la.

  15. བོད་པ། | April 23rd, 2013 | 6:11 am

    JN please don’t try to destroy our Exile society. You are said to be freedom fighter but get aged your mind come with this kind of social destroyer? if you really have heart for Tibetan society and causes, there is many critical topic that you can write, “causes of self-Immolation”, “recent land slide”, “Nomad land grabbing”, and so on. But now you starting showing your true color. Really feel pity on you and also “THE OWL”,”TSERING DORJEE”. if you guy so much heart for the Tibetan causes and CTA is not at it level then please you gay don’t run after the DOLLAR and go to CTA and serve the society.

  16. tendor | April 23rd, 2013 | 6:21 am

    Jamyang la Kudos!

    I would like to share a like minded forum to discuss these issues on larger platform.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lL-vUkl_RmM

    Tenzin Dorjee
    tendor@yahoo.com

  17. Norsang | April 23rd, 2013 | 6:45 am

    Your insightful and incisive voices and writings with far deeper concern for our fated cause, like a dismantled ship off the shore, can be got so only by an unbiased mind-set that’s at its depression phase in our exile community. Take the case of such foul regional segregation and nepotism even in our fated abject period of history. Without a true far reaching unity, so timely for a seeing mind, can we make way for a real change with those making way up to the positions and those trying to bring him down not as a caring sincere critic but shortsighted, unseeing, ill-motivated ones who care for just taking over the positions or want those who they favor to be?

    Rather than a seething petulant rancor or malice lurking for an opportunity to create a setback in our so needy and timely unity (what Chinese fear for and can such foul regional and sectarian division be its success) it’s time to speak out so as your writing. I remember His Holiness’ emphatic remarks as ‘now it’s time to find faults within our sphere rather than self-praise or yielding foolishly to such praises by outsiders.’ It’s the prime time to do so and hold on more closely rather than letting carry away by such mad-frenzy, narrow internal-destruction. Let’s say, ‘We are the fated ones.’

    I had my own experience of seeing such simmering foul frenzy during the pre-election of the present Sikyong. So sad and backward. How we can move forward then? Despite our not being a democratic administration based on multi-parties, as it’s yet to go through major shifts ahead, it’s time to exert one’s right with an unbiased sense to elect one rather than yielding to such blind frenzy that needlessly maligns on other candidates with groundless slanders. Is such a real form of democracy, justice, equality, freedom of speech or so on? Can such really help us or cripple us further?

    Forming ‘the cult of personality’ around so is our way of pampering or pre-mature sort of rating. In essence, we tend to shut ourselves and follow or say what a mouth-mongering has devised. In such case we’re so gullible or irresponsible. It’s like chasing half way blindly and returning back without anything. Such wording as ‘supreme’ president is stark incongruous as being the crude brush stroke of our way of pampering with only grandiose-sounding words. We like to use the word like ‘great’ (ཆེན་མོ་) so needlessly or unsuitably. We ignore that a real greatness or supremacy shouldn’t be internally made so but, if it deserves, to be rated so by unbiased outsiders or let it deserve so. But a welcoming reaction in modest way is really needed as we have to hold on closely or we have to give him our supports.

    Yes, as it’s my own sort of curiosity, what can be the reason of His Holiness’ silence over the spate of self-immolation?

    If those brave ones and martyrs in Tibet voiced and voice for full independence, why we distort them? They know far better than us. What goodness we can assure them by downplaying their voices and aspirations through such sterile appeasement? Yes, we always like the short-cut way through hopes and non-actions, to wait for, beg for, fawn for… In the worst case, internal segregation, strife and silencing like we haven’t lost our country. We absolutely don’t care about this prime weak point so insidious.

    I mean the urgent need of united way of walking ahead and holding on is the subject matter for only verbal flare. When it comes to the stage, the reaction is different. Why?

    For the gist of your writing it’s really unsettling for me to see the title of the documentary film. Yes, like reverting backwards to the dreamy theocratic utopia, where every kind of worldly or mundane things had happened. A bloated title serves only as a title for oneself but the potential cause of misconception, stereotypical jest to our urgent cause.

    Lastly, thanks for such writing. We have to let the world see us in true light, not pamper us as we wish.

  18. Jigme Drolma | April 23rd, 2013 | 1:46 pm

    I can’t more agree with you. Very good and deep analys of the situation. Inspiring!!

  19. Sangye | April 23rd, 2013 | 6:49 pm

    Mi Karpo la nagpo soe, mi nagpo la karpo soe…such is the Tibetan plaque we continue to let infect us.

    Shame on all those people who are against a visionary like Jamyang Norbu la!

    Jamyang la, please move forward. We youth are behind you 100%.

  20. Dhasa Yogi | April 23rd, 2013 | 9:06 pm

    Jamyang Norbu la, I don’t agree with you some of your opinion. But I will say this you are a national treasure. You are in the league of Lui Xiabao and Vaclav Havel. Things were and are never easy with them nor will it be easy for you and other writers like Woeser-la.

    Many of the Tibetans won’t be able to fathom the reason why it is so important to voice the concern you express. They will never fathom in this life nor will they even in several life times. Their intention is not bad, they are conditioned to think like this since birth.

    It is sad that our people have always held individuals more important than Tibetan nation.

    That is why the present clown, sorry, Sikyong is having all the fun running around . More I observe this guy, more he looks like Sach Baron Cohen in the film ” The Dictator” (2012).

    Those of you who have not seen the film must watch this film by British comic. The film is about ” the heroic story of a dictator who risked his life to ensure that democracy would never come to the country he so lovingly oppressed.” – Explanation of the film from Wikipedia.

    This is exactly Sikyong Lobsang (Kim) Jong Un Sangay’s game plan.

    Thank you Jamyang for your write up.

  21. The Owl | April 24th, 2013 | 3:45 am

    Slow day at work so I was web surfing, perusing some websites which were advertising the upcoming documentary on Doctor Lobsang Sangay titled, The Outsider-Tibet’s Next Incarnation? –Alas I didn’t find any video trailers but few articles caught my attention.

    http://www.theoutsider-documentary.com/story/

    I had to chuckle a few times as I slogged thru the hastily written synopsis full of spelling, typographical and factual errors,(they even manged to misspell his name on the TITLE PAGE, the caption above the photo as “Lobsang Sangai”) the narrative reads like an allegory of Buddha Siddharta Gautama’s life story.

    Sure some parts were different obviously, for unlike the mythical Buddha, Lobsang Sangay wasn’t conceived without intercourse, no miracles, omens and supernatural events were cited, nor do I believe, apart from few minor worts, blackheads and blemishes, the Sikyong is blessed with 32 major and eighty minor marks signifying his Superman-ess, but, even some of the differences had an eerily similar feel to them. Popular saying in science and philosophy is that, correlation is not causation, well judge for yourself….

    I will put quotations around the excerpts that I have cut and pasted from the hype sites)

    Once Upon A time in Nepal, the young Prince Gautama, having learned of the existence of sickness, old age and death, such signs compelled him to leave home in order to seek for a cure–without the realization of suffering in the world Gautuma would not have left his kingdom, therefore, he would never have become the Tathagata, the World Honored One.

    Once Upon a time in Nepal, a poor little boy named Lobsang Sangay’s “parents sold a cow to enable them to pay his school fees.” “Without his parents’ cow Lobsang Sangay would probably never have become the first democratically elected Prime-Minister of Tibet.” (Holy Cow!)

    Gautama wandered off in search of Enlightenment, abandoning his wife and child at the Palace.

    Lobsang Sangay “left behind his family in the US: His wife and his 5-year old daughter…”

    Prince Gautama had every creature comfort at his disposal: wealth, power, luxury, women, wine, but gave them all up; the charmed lifestyle, the security, the enviable social station–happily renouncing the materialistic world.

    “Until the election, Lobsang and his family lived in Washington D.C., where he worked as a scientist at Havard University.” (on the other site) “He studied law in the USA and spent 10 years as a lecturer at the renowned Harvard University” but then he “oppose the uniformity of the western consumer society.”

    When Siddharta was born, Asita the prophet announced that the child would become a great
    King if He but remain in the kingdom of Kapilavastu.

    If Lobsang Sangay had stayed put in USA, eventually “A high flying legal career would have been in store for him…..”

    Its also uncanny how similar Lobsang Sangay’s myth is to the archetypal hero type…hahah I can’t wait for the documentary. lol

    Funniest part is how one cow seen to have paid for all his education. Must have been one hell of a prize-winning heifer. Could it have been the same cow that is said to have jump over the moon?

    Not so cute is the idea that a guy who wrote 2, three page thesis in five years at Harvard being spin doctored as a “scientist” who spend “10 years as a lecturer at prestigious Harvard”, as if Sangay had tenure, as if he can easily be construed as an intellectual equal to some of his, ahem “colleagues” at Harvard, someone like the renowned Evolutionary Psychologist,formerly of MIT, Professor Steven Pinker, a brilliant and gifted communicator of Science. (Who don’t seem to have the ability to write books which aren’t 800 page tomes.) lol

  22. Dhasa Dhaba | April 24th, 2013 | 8:10 am

    The last photo on this page is quite interesting: http://tibet.net/2013/04/11/sikyong-dr-lobsang-sangay-arrives-in-switzerland/

    That is a black Mercedes S-class sedan, part of our Dear Leader’s convoy of five black Mercedes sedans in his recent Swiss trip. This car starts at $92,000 so the combined price of his five-car convoy is at least $460,000. http://www.mbusa.com/mercedes/vehicles/class/class-S

    Who was paying for our Dear Leader to rent a convoy that is worth almost half a million dollars??

    And even if some wealthy donor is paying, is this really the way donations to the CTA should be used??

    And what does it make us look like, as refugees?? How can we Tibetans ask anyone for help when our Dear Leader is parading around like “The Dictator” (Sasha Baron Cohen film)?? Aviator sunglasses and all.

    This is horrible public relaions… we are not some corrupt African dictatorship. But that is what our Dear Leader is making us look like, and many innocent Tibetans are eating it up instead of questioning.

  23. Bhod_Rangzen | April 24th, 2013 | 9:59 am

    Sikyong’s recent speech in Switzerland, he lectured the tibetans tobe “yarab” ,”nyamchung” and so on. A person with zero insight and flawed as any human being giving such a speech? Did he become the Sikyong by being yarab and nyamchung? “yarab nyamchung” with selfish thoughts and evil intentions are just that – evil and selfish. Is he that selfish that all he cares about is the control and submission of the tibetan people? What kind of a leader have we got? I hope i’m right when i say that that most tibetans know to be ethical and compassionate but also assertive and upright-guided by one’s personal core values like- democracy, justice, equality, integrity etc and not listen to this narrow focus of “yarab nyamchung” advise.
    Lobsang Sangay seems to get a “high” when he sees all the adulation and pomp and show in his honor. It goes to his head.most people will take it with a pinch of salt or feel humbled by the whole experience – but people like him get addicted to the rush and constantly have to seek it out. Sikyong’s deep insecurity seems to stem from the traumatic experience of seeing his father sell the family cow for his education. Since then he vowed never ever to be in such a position and this has manifested in him becoming this delusional narcissist. Its more dangerous because he is a functioning delusional narcissist. And in this day and age of reality shows there’ll be no dearth of people cashing in to feed the ego of such people. Who will be the losers? Tibetans and the Tibet issue.Before anyone start to thrash me -let me tell you that i dont hate Lobsang Sangay. He is the type nobody will hate and thats how he will get away with a lot.

  24. Lhasawa | April 24th, 2013 | 11:10 am

    Devil jamyang norbu has changed the TOPIC because his aristocratic cousin gotta job at RFA….. Go to hell jamyang crack Chinese spy …. Once evil jamyang was expelled from dharmsala by whole community that’s what you think whole society is stupid, dumb except you ? Do you feel proud to have monkey faced brainwashed people supports while most of Tibetan spit up your face ? When you go hell no tibetan Buddhist monk will pray or ritual for your filthy body ….. How do feel yourself as a tibetan without knowing any tibetan alphabets….?

  25. daveno | April 24th, 2013 | 11:58 am

    Exam Marksheet for Popo JN piece

    1.Organizational skill = C-
    2.Reasoning = D
    3.Comparative analysis skill= F
    4.High scholl certificate = N/A
    5.Nationality= Ramaluk
    6.Emotional skills=C (excessive jeolousy-recommend rinchen manjor)
    7. Spinning skill = A+ (Eligible for PHD in Spinning)

    Overall Mark = D-

    Do not be discouraged by this, its a natural process of human (aging) to exibit signs of alzeimer and dementia.

  26. The Owl | April 24th, 2013 | 12:13 pm

    Dhasa Yogi and Dhasa Dhaba, calling Doctor Lobsang Sangay Kim Jong-un or comparing him to a Dictator is really a classless thing to do, and what’s more, it is totally unfair and mean spirited. Save that sh!t for motherb!tch China!

    Whether we like it or not, he was elected by a majority vote, therefore, as the top representative of the Tibetan people and Nation, he should be accorded the highest respect and VIP treatment that we can give him. This reflects positively for our people, and in the eyes of the World. The way we treat our leaders indirectly communicates to the greater international community that our Kalons should be taken seriously, that they have the mandate of the people, even if, at this time, we are bereft of a country, even if, at this time, Western nations DON’T take us very seriously.

    I don’t know what you guys want him to do, go around with a begging bowl in hand just like the Buddha did back in the days? Not even our well fed monks would ever think of doing that.

    While I have no facts to back up my opinion, I doubt very much that CTA pays for any of these grand receptions, it’s most likely that the various communities our Sikyong visits have raised the money themselves.

  27. Kalsang Phuntsok | April 24th, 2013 | 12:34 pm

    I tend to some what agree with The Owl’s comment #26. However, Jamyang la’s cautionary message should not be overlooked. May be it is just me, but I have often sensed a very strong opportunistic tendencies in LS. Sometimes, he makes me feel like he will say or do anything to stay in power. And that makes me a bit nervous. And all the confusion created by the so called “devolution of power” compounds the whole thing.

  28. Lila | April 24th, 2013 | 1:03 pm

    It’s very strange that there’s even any question of the Sakyong being a reincarnation. It seems obsurd and illogical, and totally out of character for someone as well educated as he is. One would think he would have a greater sense of acumen, and a sense of the common good than to go along with anything so perposterous. Reincarnate Tulkus generally are discovered at a young age, and go through rigorous training. This in itself does disqualifies the Sakyong of making such a claim. How many treatises has he mastered, and how many years did he spend in solitary retreat in order to even suggest that he is a reincarnate leader? This kind of thing sounds very dangerous, since it seems to be based on the very thing that the teachings warn against, and that is the dangers of ego run amock.

    It seems to me that Thupten Wangchen, Tibetan parliament member in Spain, was also talking about independence. There were loud cries for “Rangzen” in Amsterdam when he was there. I could be mistating his views, but I’m sure he spoke about independence. He is also from Namgyal monastery.

    Other Tibetan leaders also speak about independence, like Kirti Rinpoche. He said that it was only a matter of time before Tibet was free.

    The Middle Way approach does make sense from His Holiness’s point of view, so no needs to discredit him at all.

    There should be more room for dissent and open debate within the Tibetan community.

    I think His Holiness has also said that he can’t tell Tibetans inside Tibet what to do. He says so many things. I’m sure he’s open to differing views.

    The fact remains that His Holiness is a very powerful person, so his power and influence aren’t going to disappear just because he leaves office. He is adored around the world, and has tremendous power and charisma. I personally don’t see how this could be equated to his abdication as a ruse. Power shifts occur slowly. Change occurs slowly. He will remain an important voice on the Tibetan issue, and people will continue to look at him as an authority. People within Tibet want him back for good reason. I think he really does deserve all of our respect. After all, he is Holiness.

    I hope democracy will flourish within the TIbetan exile community, with room for differing opinions, and voices.

    The Tibetan Youth Congess seems like a great organization to me, with a lot of strong-minded young people participating. It should be allowed to flourish. They do such a diverse number of things.

    The Tibetan issue is such a difficult one. And the Chinese government isn’t going to back down, or give in. They’re not just going to give up their expansionist grab for power. Tibet is a literal goldmine. The only hope for change seems to be new Chinese leadership with more democratic views.

    There have been periods when the Chinese regime lightened up its control on Tibetan society. So it seems like this will happen again.

    Change is constant.

    The Buddhist teachings are very powerful. More and more Chinese people are becoming Tibetan Buddhists. I think the power of Tibet lies in Buddhism. This is already happening. I think the Chinese people, and the Tibetan people are united in one cause. Maybe it’s only a matter of time before the Chinese regime is forced to concede to this.

    China is destroying its environment. Eventually they will have to change their undemocratic ways, or China will become a wasteland.

    There are a multitude of factors at play. In time, there will be change.

    It seems to me that HH Karmapa will become a very great world leader, and also a great force in this process. Something he is already doing now.

    Tibetan culture is extremely rich. It is so abudant, and so powerful. I really believe there is great cause for hope. The sheer power of Tibetan cultural traditions will be self-sustaining. I think it’s really incredible. There is a terrible crisis going on now, but this time will pass. The force of change will come, and even the Chinese regime can’t stop it.

  29. Lhasawa | April 24th, 2013 | 1:12 pm

    Tendor #16 thanks for sharing shugden groups talk that deserve for JN ….. JN should invite that talk show by shugden group, it’s very suit for him….. Tendor la, it’s good for you to listen to them, later on you can join with jamyang la and TPR memebers to shugden group ….
    Have a great party with them at TOE NYALAM phegyaling gompa ….. With some shugden stupid Khampas ….

  30. Kalsang Phuntsok | April 24th, 2013 | 1:33 pm

    I think the main strength of the article lies in the last 9 paragraphs. JN la is effectively asking if this a charade in which we all are collectively pretending that we have a democratic system or is it really a democracy. Did devolution of power really occurred or are we just saying it did just for the show. And for who’s benefit?

    Thank you Jamyang la for shining the light on the dark spots.

  31. Tsering Dawa | April 24th, 2013 | 1:56 pm

    I, Lobsang Sangay, the supreme leader of Tibet declare JN a traitor and be hanged to death immediately. haha. Call our Sikyong anything you want, but the fact of the matter is that he cannot even stop you from blogging. We had enough of your distractions. Please stop the BS and let us focus on China. Thanks.

  32. Dawa | April 24th, 2013 | 1:57 pm

    I am so glad JN la came out this piece. I was beginning to worry that he has given up. I still don’t understand the details of role of president versus prime minister but I was thinking Tibetans elected a PRIME MINISTER. Why are those people greeting him holding “Supreme President” signs? “supreme?” How vulgar and in bad taste, or as our teenage children would say “HOW WEDGY!”

    I won’t be surprised if the head of those communities were suggested informally ( and secretly) by people connected to those in power. Just like they were asking head of Tibetan Communities to write letters objecting to congressman Dana Rohbracher. I couldn’t believe my ears when I first heard it. This is dangerous subversion of democratic principles not to mention unethical and un-Buddhist in nature.
    I was also very saddened and disheartened when His Holiness during a religious teaching discredited Rangzen people and made suggestion that those who are for complete independence were somehow against him. We don’t need to keep on repeating how much we revere him without sounding sycophantic. I always thought that His Holiness was in earnest when he said that middle way was one option.
    I am beginning to feel real rush of sympathy for those who worship Shugden. How torn they must feel with their love of His Holiness and wishing to hear his teachings but at the same time not being able to break bond with a deity that they inherited from their forefathers.

    Our people, although we carry prayer wheels, and rosary, and mumble ‘mani pay me’ incessantly, we can be very cruel, very unthinking, very judgmental, and very O very self-righteous. Shugden worshippers are our very own people who haven’t done any harm to anyone and who suffered and lost under the Chinese just like the rest of us. What would Buddha think if he sees us now. He will bang his head on a rock with grief like one of his manifestations did. We want to worship our deities but don’t want others to worship theirs. I digress here but this has given me sleepless nights. This injustice and this cruelty that we are responsible for towards a group of our own people. We Tibetans are hypocrites.
    And now we are fiddling with our democracy for expediency. And I hope those Iagos in Dharamsala quit whispering misinformation into His Holiness’s ears.

  33. tenzin Dhonyoe | April 24th, 2013 | 2:00 pm

    To the Owl Above: You try to denounce His Holiness in the name of Liberal Democracy? Its not so convincing. Your own remarks reveal deep seated illiberal values within you. What a hypocrite! His Holiness is entitled to his opinions and his public service record speaks for itself. Bark all you can. At the end of the day you are just another lost Tibetan, a wild yak who knows how to bark in the English language!

  34. Dawa | April 24th, 2013 | 2:02 pm

    If the iagos and neros in dharamsala have the power they would no doubt have hanged their intellectuals.

  35. tashi gyaltsen | April 24th, 2013 | 2:10 pm

    While Jamyang Norbu la’s effort and hard work for the Tibetan cause is not questionable, his writings often criticize our exile government and especially Sikyong Lobsang Sangay la. China is already delegitimizing our exile government as the ultimate government of the Tibetan people and I am sure China does not need Jamyang Norbu la’s help.

  36. Dawa | April 24th, 2013 | 5:18 pm

    Dissent is integral part of a functioning democracy. Chinese undermining Tibetan people’s right to independence is different from people of a nation criticizing their government. IF criticism has hurt a nation I am sure America should be reeling and authoritarian countries like North Korea should be flourishing and every one vying to get to those countries.
    Those who flatter and turn blind eyes to mistakes and flaws in the system are no more patriotic and those who are honest and point out flaws are no less patriotic.
    In fact there is a saying in Tibetan: Shatsay Khala Tahmmnyen mey. True words stings. But they won’t bite your behind when it is too late.
    The chamchas will forever denounce and attack viciously those who criticize people in authority. Sometimes they were in majority and sometimes they were in minority. But they can’t think for themselves. They a huge behind to stick their noses into and an imaginary bad guy to beat on. In short they can’t think and are proud of that stupidity. What is most annoying of it is when others use their head they cannot stand it.

  37. Agu Tonpa | April 24th, 2013 | 5:36 pm

    Hey People,
    Don’t pick and choose topic that you dislike and whine whine, whine! Instead, try to understand the main point of the article and discuss. That will help us grow as an individual and a community members.
    I am sure that 99% of the people here are good Tibetan whether for or against the topic. Rangzen advocate people are not like that of Shugdhen People (Some equate JN with Shugdhen people: Ajo-Che of LA was sending JN photos with some Chushi-Gangdruk people who happens to be shugdhen followers).
    If you read his article carefully, he said, “he is old-fashioned enough to keep faith with His Holiness.” Shugdhen people have no faith in HHDL. What JN was saying is IF HH keeps on making his opinion, it is very difficult for others to disagree and argue. Without the freedom to discent and argue, democracy is a just name sake. China can call themselves democratic country if election is the only criteria.

    Second, JN is saying that His Holiness gets information from wrong people. His example of Ministers going to his religious discourse on every occasion is to find an opportunity to give His Holiness the information they want to convey. This is an interesting theory. but, i agree to some extend. Unless you give the right information, there is always a chance that others in power (Ganden Phodrang, Namgyal Dratsang and Yabshis) might give information to HH which may be correct, or incorrect. If i am a Sikyong, i want to inform HH the correct info myself.

    People like Thomtok Trulku, abbot of the Dalai Lama’s private Namgyal Monastery, and Samdhong Rinpoche was behind the whole “HH Distress” theory and wreck havoc in the community. They put kerosene in the fire and the “HH Hurt” videos and Speeches were distributed widely in the name Gadhen Phodrang to discredit TYC and Rangzen Activist. Do you remember that? What do you say about that?

    And what do you say about Thomtok Trulku’s action. JN was right. Trulku made that speech in Minnesota. He also made all the Lithangwa sign to not to join the Rangzen movement and Feb 13 celebration. Thomtok Trulku’s speech was a precursor to HH speech in Salugara. I think that Thomtok Tulku has allegiance to Los Sangye- his Phayul Chikpa- than HH. In the name of His Holiness distress, he carries out many of the Sangye’s administration policies.

    Is JN wrong in calling out Loud Thomptok Trulku and Samdhong rinpoche’s action, OR they are wrong in conveying false information to HH?

    Another Question is: Don’t we have a constitutional crisis or sort? Who is the head of state and who is the head of the government? Is Lobsang Sangye Sikyong or Supreme President of Tibet?

    Does Sikyong care about the use/misuse of his Title. So far, it seems he doesn’t care as long as it’s is positive about him- be Supreme President or the Tibet’s incarnate. But is that good for TIbet?

    Yes, we need to elevate the international profile of Sikyong. But do you think with black SUVs and black tie with black glasses will elevate his profile? Geoge Bush and Obama has the same Air force one, house in the white house and same privileges, but not same high international profile. It just tells us that after all, decent people judge people not by the color or appearance but by the content of their character.” For Sikyong, the irony is that his supporter always call U-tsangwas his enemy and all Khampas has to come and support. Thats why, if you check the security guard, there are almost always recruit Khampas. This communal thing is happening and he knows well and his silence just smacks in the face of his U-tsang supporters.

    So again, don’t pick and choose the dislike words and argue on that. Instead, discuss on the main points.

    Yours,
    AGU

  38. Agu Tonpa | April 24th, 2013 | 5:43 pm

    Oh! With that Supreme President of Tibet- it reminds me of the following two:
    1. Supreme Leader of Iran: Ayotolla Kohemini
    2. Supreme Leader of N. Korea: Kim Jong-un

    3? Supreme President of Tibet: Losang Sangye????

    That Supreme thing must go. Sikyong should make that clear. And also tell the organizer to use his correct title.

  39. Thupten Norsang | April 24th, 2013 | 5:51 pm

    JN la,
    I think this time is Karma Choephel la talking is wrong. Why he took support from His Holiness words. Can’t he stand by self for Rangtsen? Is he really poor that he cannot take step without HH words? There are so many points to keep Rangtsen way. All countries have not HH. But they are fighting for Rangtsen. He can say some important points why he change his way for Rangtsen. He messed up everything. He knocked HH door. Of course HH should say something if he bring HH name in his talk. CCP will think HH talk and and will is not same. Karma Choephel la do not how to talk in the public. He might be Khewang but I feel he is kind of messer.

  40. theopagha | April 24th, 2013 | 7:16 pm

    Thupten and JN lak,

    It’s good that you start to raise Karma Choephel (KC) in this discussion which JN knowingly or unknowingly ignored forgot to credit at the least.
    Some of the key issues JN mentioned in this article which he think no individual thought of or raised these issues is not true. KC did warn in the recent parliament session that we are a headless state, and in case we need to dissolve the parliament, we don’t know who has the power to do so (watch ctaonline.tv).

    Also some of the recent events that unfurled after the parliament session (Gaden Phodrang clarification letter, HHDL speech in Salugura, Samdhong’s talk at Tibetan day school, Dotoe people meeting in Hunsur) could be generally in response to the growing dissent towards Rangzen advocates and I would think all these repercussion was triggered in response to KC’s individual statement in the recent parliament session rejecting Middle way policy. So am little bit surprised, and discontent that someone like JN, following the same slogan of Rangzen, did not slightly support or credit the one of the most vocal advocate of Rangzen left in the Tibetan parliament.

    KC use of HHDL prayers in advocating his Rangzen stand raises a much deeper questions and controversy that you’ll not be able to fathom at this time.

  41. Allen Yangzom | April 24th, 2013 | 8:17 pm

    MUST READ: Very interesting and one of the comment mentioned very clearly that the majority of the Tibetan people have not, and will not understand the depth if there is any including myself.

    I did not vote for Lobsang Sangay la, but found him to be taking the right approach, giving opportunity to the young ones, meeting with various world leaders, and giving enough opportunity to the Kalons to get down to the people.

    Dicky la as Kalon was a mockery to me in the beginning but now I felt it to be a great choice.However, having said these, it is important to have check and balances not only within the parliament which in our context can be manipulative, but have someone from outside mentioning these.

    Like many I did not and still did not take Kalon Tripa or Sikyong that seriously. The use of Prime minister is to the outside world where the Tibetan words may not be enough.
    The term Sikyong confuses me when H.H. mentioned this, making himself as “Choekyong”.

    Then mercedes convoy stuff is disheartening if we are paying for it. In that LS la should learn from the current Pope or read Mother Teresa’s trip to New York…

    If the constitution changes with regard to the voting system, or the tenure of “Sikyong”, then we should feel the Morsi jolt…

    Allen

  42. The Owl | April 24th, 2013 | 8:19 pm

    Yes, Tenzin Dhonyoe, as you say, I might be a “lost Tibetan.” I might be a hypocrite at times too. Aren’t we all at times?? However, I definitively don’t agree with you that “wild yak” barks–not sure if they even moo either…

    I am not denouncing his holiness in the name of liberal democracy but in the name of little honesty. As Lila rightly pointed out, the Dalai Lama “says so many things.” and that’s the rub, that is where I have issues with the man. He is like the bible, full of rhetorical sayings, often contradictory from one passage to the next.

    Generally speaking, I find the Dalai Lama faithless to truth.(one who hungers for truth, no matter how unpleasant is a different creature from one who hungers for consolation) He seems to be full of faith and enthusiasm for whatever it takes to gain world recognition for himself, the middle way cause and Buddhism– so that he ends up making so many contradictory statements in order to please as many people as possible.

    For example, when he engages with scientists, he eagerly agree with whatever they tell him about the latest sciences, feigning great respect and love for the scientific method and discoveries but never implementing any paradigm shift in the Tibetan educational system or the settlements. (science curriculum have only recently been introduced into the Geluk Universities thanks mainly to the instigation and good graces of Emory University which sponsors science initiatives for monks.)

    He and his priests, for centuries have brain washed the ignorant among our society to the efficacy of deity worship, deities like Dorjee Shugden; then one day, he orders the same gullible flock to, Knock It Off!!

    Some say, He “give us democracy”, yet, paradoxically, the person who “gave us democracy” is the very worm at the core who is eating away liberal democratic values and processes by modifying the constitution, titles, names, with a snap of the finger.

    He boasts about loving the Marxist Utopian notion that all wealth and responsibility can be “shared equally”, gleefully ignorant of the tragedy of the Commons, of innate human nature, differing skills, intelligence and capabilities within individuals. That he can express such quaint Marxist dribble(so dichotomous with Democracy)sitting on a throne with people grovelling at his feet as the redrobed minions shower him with cha and crumpets. Not only is this laughable, but obscene too.

    Put down the spinning wheel and think for a minute. What would the Dalai Lama really know about Democracy anyway? Someone, born with a silver spoon in his mouth, raised as a prince, always getting his way, pampered and spoiled all his life.

    What possible experience would the Dalai Lama have for Marxism when he never have to do menial labor in his life, such everyday chores we all do without a thought: Vacuuming the house, cooking and cleaning, doing dishes and laundry.

    If he is really that gungho about the romantic idea of Marxism, if he wants to feel it, touch it, who the hell is keeping him from washing his own toilet once in a while or cooking his own breakfast? And you call me a hypocrite Tenzin Dhonyoe.

    Now some may object and say to me, you idiot, are you that naive?? The reason for the Dalai Lama’s subterfuge is this is how realpolitik is done! The ground reality is, that our yeas cant be yeas and nays can’t be nays. That image trumps substance! Learn from China!

    Maybe that is a legitimate point, and if this is indeed the case, if this is our covert strategy, to bamboozle everyone as long as we are on the moral high ground, as long as we get what you want, truth be dammed, then lets go full out, pedal to the metal by not only impersonating Democracy but also make much ado about gender equality. Believe me, this will impress the liberal western nations who are very touchy about women’s rights. Why not install a woman Sikyong? I am serious! Because the international community wouldn’t dare ignore a woman PM as easily as they ignore Doctor Sangay.

    Anyway, contrary to what you may think of me, Tenzin Dhonyoe, I do not hate the Kundun, and I agree that he gives hope to lot of people who are in need of hope.

    To state that “its just His Holiness’s opinion” is a cop out, an intellectually bankrupt omission as Kundun’s “opinions” tend to become national policy, whereas, my opinions, you can easily take it or leave it, in the long run, it doesn’t matter.

  43. old monk | April 24th, 2013 | 8:26 pm

    i think we can’t be that harsh on LS. At least he’s successfully filled the potential political vacumn after Dalai Lama’s sudden resignation. He has also successfully managed to retain a sense of our diretion as a stateless nation, and won people’s loyalty. He’s for better or worse a strong contender for Nobel Peace Prize in some year’s time, and that will be big boost for Tibet’s international profile, not to mention a new least of energy for freedom struggle. I think we have to make every effort to enhance his stature.

  44. Choephel T. Baro | April 24th, 2013 | 8:49 pm

    What a great piece of writing! as always. I thoroughly enjoyed it. A close observation of our political scene may not be possible for many of us, but your writings afford us the ringside view of Central Tibetan Administration ( I hope I am current with the ever-changing name)…with warts and all. And, yes you make us laugh too.

  45. Dot | April 24th, 2013 | 8:59 pm

    I’m deeply saddened but not surprised by reading some of the comments to JN’s article. Some people might say we are one of the most successful refugees in the world, some may say it is because of DL or Buddhism. It might be so for some reason but I see more reasons why should we be more worried then ever. I have few questions, the answers I’ve been longing for a while:

    1) Why don’t Tibetans question an authority relating to Buddhism? Why religious Tibetans feel superior to people of other religion or an ethiest?
    2) Why 90+ % of Tibetan population is Buddhist? Why don’t they accept a non buddhist Tibetan in a community?
    3) Why don’t majority of Tibetans have the ear to listen to different views, let alone an open debate?
    4) Why kids, as yong as 5, are allowed to join a monastery when the kid has absolutely no idea what he want to become in life?
    5) Why do we avoid responsibility (or using our precious brain) by saying ‘ everything will be alright under the blessing of DL or Kunchok sum’?
    6) why do we lack self reflection or why do we always point the finger to other?
    7) Why didn’t we produc enough critical thinkers in the last 50 years?
    8) Can we expect anything different from the next generation?
    9) Are we as a society on the verge of collapse or is this the dawn for a fresh beginning?
    Is it because Tibetan as a race is a stupid race? Is it because how we are brought up? Or Is it Religion?

    Ask yourself these questions with an open mind. There is no harm reflecting on your society/self.

  46. tenzin Dhonyoe | April 24th, 2013 | 10:58 pm

    Owl: You are just so lost like Jamyang Norbu. Like him, I am sure you have stopped interacting with Tibetan communities or serve us in our various institutions. Like the Chinese government, you have taken the easy way out to deal with the apparent frustration that we are going through: Blame His Holiness the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan government. This way, you don’t have to deal with the real challenge: China and and its policies.
    No wonder the Chinese are frequently quoting Jamyang Norbu’s article as a “prove” to discredit HIs Holiness the Dalai Lama and Dharamsala.
    For different reasons, people like Jamyang Norbu-la and yourself make strange bedfellows with the Chinese regime. It is sad because you mean good, at least I hope so.

  47. tsering dorjee | April 24th, 2013 | 11:15 pm

    Old Monk: A Nobel Peace Prize???!!!! For what?? Wearing a suit, a black suit, and avoiding being at Gangchen Kyeshong? Was it your idea to make that movie because it is fishy how it almost calls him the next incarnation? So, first you make him a scholar who never produced shit, then you make a quasi documentary about him being a almost deity, and then the Noble Peace prize. hey, it might actually work. Hopefully, he won’t screw it up by touching any more ladies.

  48. tenzin Dhonyoe | April 24th, 2013 | 11:24 pm

    The Chinese government is spending billions of dollars for negative campaign against His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Dharamsala. Look at how the so called Confucius Institutions are mushrooming in Western Universities under the full funding and guidance of Chinese government. One of the main goals is to discredit His Holiness and his moral influence. just see how Sydney University cancelled a talk by His Holiness under the influence of their Confucius Institute.
    Meanwhile Tibetans in Tibet are giving their lives calling for the return of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. And what do you guys do in response to the above two issues I mentioned?
    YOU HAVE CHOSE to discredit His Holiness the Dalai Lama for your sickening assumption that some how he pose a barrier to free speech and democracy and indirectly harms the Tibetan cause. What a service to the nation nation! How appropriate of a way to honor our Tibetan heros who have self immolated themselves calling for the return of His Holiness to return to Tibet!

  49. Mangtso Kyakpa | April 25th, 2013 | 12:22 am

    We have a long long way to go before real democracy is embraced and practiced!!!

  50. Tashi | April 25th, 2013 | 7:22 am

    Tenzin dhonyoe,
    Please I have heard that same talk for the past 30years. Stop that ranting. We live in21st century and this is not the direction of talks will be moving. If it is then we r back to 1940′ s tibet.

    I was shocked to hear hhdl talks in salugara about rang zen. For me it was very discouraging. His holiness opinion means lot for Tibetans,but this one is hard to take. I have all the copies of march ten statements since coming to exile and in that there is no word of middle way. Talked about freedom and independence s a lot.
    So as we say in college with our friends, once again I AM CONFUSED BY HHDL REMARKS..
    I think it is a very good idea now that hhdl has retired,less opinion in order to progress the state of tibet.

  51. daveno | April 25th, 2013 | 8:16 am

    Next time when Syikyong ( His Holiness Syikyong) visits near my neck of the wood, i will make sure to receive him to my community of 7 family for an afternoon tea.I will hire a private plane attached with TIBETAN NATIONAL FLAG AND TIBET on both side of the plane to receive HIS HOLINESS SYIKYONG.
    Jamyang norbu la, This is not because i supported this individual for HIS HOLINESS SYIKYONG position, but OUT OF MY RESPECT for that position representing all Tibetan (you wont care,if you are ramaluk).
    What can you do, i have dough and i can use my dough anyway i want–any problem?

    By the way,the Mong-thay generation who came to beat you up in 80’s or 90’s are now in GHENSOKHANG or LEFT… the young fella these days carries brain that are trained and educated well that emotional blackmailing will achieve nothing but backfire you.

  52. Jamyang Norbu | April 25th, 2013 | 9:00 am

    Thanks Thupten la (39) and Thoepaga la (40)for raising the issue of Karma Chophel la’s statement giving up his support for the Middle Way. The Tibetan National Congress posted a statement supporting his stand and started a signature campaign. Check it out on http://www.tibetnc.org/get-involved/advocacy/karma-choephel/ .

    An excellent Tibetan translation of “TIBET’S NEXT INCARNATION?” by Gedun Rabasal is on this website: http://www.khabdha.org/?p=45708

  53. tenzin Dhonyoe | April 25th, 2013 | 9:00 am

    Tashi above: Are you asking me to stop my ranting because we live in the 21st century so that people like you can keep ranting in the name of democracy however damaging and undemocratic they may be? Don’t you see the irony here? GIVE me a break you and your modernity!

  54. Jha Khading | April 25th, 2013 | 11:40 am

    In his biography ༼རྣམ་ཐར།༽ of Mila Repa, Tsangnyon Heruka writes:

    When one of his disciples asked Mila Repa whose reincarnation he was, the great Yogi said:

    I don’t even know myself whose reincarnation I am. Believing me as some great Boddhisatva’s reincarnation is actually your superstition. ༼དག་སྣང་།༽

    In fact, the worst form of heresy ༼ལོག་བལྟ།༽is to believe in reincarnation.

  55. Lhasawa | April 25th, 2013 | 11:42 am

    #52 Stubborn jamyang, I would translate your whole “Tibet’ next incarnation ” just in one word that’s ༼ དཀྲུགས་ཤིང་༽ ་་་་་་ hopefully you like as reality its ….you should Ashame of your jealousy and hatred for your aristocratic cousin’s defeated ….. Go to hell with shugden follower parents, they waiting for you all the way back there in hell …. བོད་མིའི་ཀླ་ཀློ་ :::: སྡུག་ཤི་རྒྱབ་བ་ཤོག་་་་་་

  56. Tashi | April 25th, 2013 | 11:59 am

    Tenzin dhonyoe,
    I just do not like the way u bring ur discussion, like Chinese doing this and that and hhdl doing this or that for Tibetans. Everybody knows who is doing what, u did not need to bring this case in order to have ur information worth. Do u know what I mean. It can go to my parents generation but not for us younger ones. This is what I meant rant to speak clearly.

  57. Tashi | April 25th, 2013 | 12:03 pm

    Lhasawa,
    No more acts of cultural revolution here. Be decent and share your opinion but not that cheap words. I can see how much courage and strength you have. Nyingye!

  58. daveno | April 25th, 2013 | 12:20 pm

    Those who are not comfortable with HHDL providing FREE advice and expressing his opinions does not need to listen to him.

    No one is threatening you to listen to him..OWL!

    But just as you need freedom of expression and do wahtever you like, others rights should also be respected if they want to listen to HHDL,its their rights and you need to shut tied your asss.

    You can call whatever you like to HHDL,even worse than what CCP is name calling him.No one gives a damn!(forget about threats or stuff).But be prepared to be judged when you judge others.

  59. Dawa Gyamtso | April 25th, 2013 | 12:25 pm

    Take it easy guys. JN is a fiction writer. This is just a fiction. It is a sequel to his best fiction “Sherlock Holmes: The Missing Years; The Adventures of the Great Detective in India and Tibet”. It is all JN’s imagination, not based on any facts and figures.

    I was in Dharamsala last week. I didn’t see any power consolidation. Sikyong Lobsang Sangay is living like any other Gangkyi staff. He is not surrounded by a retinue of servants, body guards, reporters and VIPs. He lives in a simple two bedroom apartment with one attached bathroom. He eats at the common mess and plays basket ball with other staff after work.

  60. Pasang | April 25th, 2013 | 1:43 pm

    Our very Supreme President and Sikyong likes basketball very much like Supreme Leder Kim jongun also. Dennis Rodman in interview said that Supreme leader was also a simple guy who just wants to talk peace.

  61. Dawa | April 25th, 2013 | 2:59 pm

    Jamyang la’s piece is great. No Tibetan young or old can think and analyse and read an write like he does. If people can dissect what he wrote and provide facts to argue for and against it that will be a great contribution. But if you get upset and wish to shut him up with personal attacks and emotional black mails like “upsetting kundun” and other flimsy reasoning then look into your self and think put these questions to yourself: “Do I sound like the Red Guards? Do I sound like McCarthy? Am I equating His Holiness with some leaders who think they are beyond criticism? Is His Holiness that sensitive and intolerant?”

  62. Kalsang Phuntsok | April 25th, 2013 | 3:08 pm

    Is the Tibetan Religious establishment hoping for something like the Lateran Treaty with China’s Fascist government?

    Just wondering…

  63. Tenam | April 25th, 2013 | 3:08 pm

    If the Sikyong wants to wear the Supreme crown or the Ultimate crown in his spare time thats his wish. But when in office no playing barbie doll games. thats my only request. thank you!

  64. LHAKPA DOLMA | April 25th, 2013 | 3:49 pm

    Personlly, I do like HH’s teachings and i do learn from them because he has an overall undersanding/knowledge of all the methods/ paths of all sects having had easy access to the best teachers available. Also HH is doing a lot for the world at large including china and chinese and that is something good for the world. But when it comes to his talks/ interviews related to Tibetans and dealing with China, I always take it with a grain of salt. you know how our elders are sometimes stubborn and they are set in their ways – but we learn to accept them, we still respect them as our parents/elders, love and care for them because we know that they mean well but that doesnt mean they know everything or that they are right all the time.Give them their due and just do what you have to do.
    btw, Jamyang Norbu la, thank you for being this beacon of light to us Tibetans.your hard work is truly appreciated.

  65. Geshe Chaphur | April 25th, 2013 | 4:19 pm

    In our society there has often been attempts to silence intellectuals and thinkers. It has been the case in our history. I hope you all will think rationally and not jump to conclusions so quickly.
    Criticism cannot harm our leaders. It can help them to see where they are going wrong and improve their actions.

  66. Lhasawa | April 25th, 2013 | 6:05 pm

    @ tashi, don’t be too loud wthout showing any parts of ur filthy face, you indo-Tibetans thinks you can do something while Tibetans in side Tibet burning themselves, fighting within yourself while Chinese are laughing at you, cyber kids gangster. … . Why 50 years begging to feed ur stomach is not still enough? 50years ago your shameless parents sold Tibet to china and went towards India with all theirs belonging s even broom on the back of donkey…. Just keep begging 50 more years in india and sold your ass to india. …… you are not deserves to talk about Tibet cause you are a more Indian Tibetan….cyber kidsgangster. …hu.hu.hu. nyijey for yourself …

  67. old monk | April 25th, 2013 | 6:34 pm

    dalai lama in this video actually says lobsang sangay is like president. DL says, ” i am completely retired. he[LS]like president, all power in his hand. at 00.00-01.00 time http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rM5D1N31MC8

  68. The Owl | April 25th, 2013 | 7:15 pm

    Lhakpa Dolma, that is a thoughtful statement you made; that when it comes to talks, interviews and lectures given by Kundun, in which one does not agree with, “accept them with a grain of salt.”

    Yes, I think it might be prudent for Tibetans to be aware, the Dalai Lama never had a proper modern education, so he could be wrong on occasion. Nothing wrong with being wrong, even most (if not ALL) scary, brilliant minds in history have errored once in a while, intellectual giants like Plato, Aristotle, Newton, Einstein, Darwin, Locke, Descartes, William James, David Hume, John Stuart Mill, T,H. Huxley, etc, etc, etc…

    However, when it comes to Tibetan Buddhism, the teachings, the rituals, the dogmas, the stories, the Dalai Lama could be regarded as an “expert.” Even the wider world, the Universities, the Colleges, seem to go along with the idea that Kundun is an expert in the field of Theology by awarding him with numerous honorary Doctorate Degree in Metaphysics over the years. Though I sometimes wonder, what kind of a disease is Metaphysics?

    About the “Supreme Leader” idea….

    Assuming the Tulkuization of Lobsang Sangay, aided and abetted by the mentorship of the Dalai Lama is true. If it is true, then I think this is a shrewd political move on their part.

    Almost 3000 years ago, the inventor of Metaphysics, Aristotle, perceptively captures the essence of such Machiavellian stratagem when he wrote;

    “A ruler must put on the appearance of uncommon devotion to religion. Subjects are less apprehensive of illegal treatment from a ruler who they consider god fearing and pious.”
    “On the other hand, they less easily move against him, believing he has the gods on his side.”

    Such emblematic piety of a leader would be doubly effective in our pious society. (see Dalai Lama)

  69. Tashi | April 25th, 2013 | 8:45 pm

    Lhasawa,
    Oh please, do not pretend, . Why r u lying for no reason. Tibetans inside tibet are offering their bodies because they did not want to stay under Chinese rule.my parents did not sold tibet, it was from yr name tag place that every decision was made.
    What do u mean by Indian tibetan. Ur comments makes no sense for us(young generation)so I am going to end this debate with u unless u comes out with proper meaningful words,

  70. daveno | April 25th, 2013 | 9:31 pm

    In our community, a criticism against a critic is unjust.I wonder why?..should it not be both ways, it will only improve the critic on his next subject (spinning).

    To call upon the dracula of past century to apply their logic and expression to current ongoing environment is similar to ‘trying to understand mathematical computation with the knowledge of biology.

    I like to listen to HHDL teaching and his lapja.I always pick up that will benefit ME(OFCOURSE EVERYONE DOES).if a lapja does not apply to me or if it is beyond my knowledge or understanding i wont apply his lapja or have doubts on things i dont understand.But i never thought of blaming him when his lapja does not work for me,afterall i am the one who went to him and was never forced to listen or apply his lapja. Nor do i blame him for having many human following him.Its not his choice but those following him who have every rights to do wahtever they like..just like me they also have a functioning brain of their own.

  71. An Observer | April 25th, 2013 | 10:21 pm

    I’ve feared that for some time that a new alternative future “embodiment” of the Dalai Lama is being concocted under the stewardship of those closest to HHDL. This alternative would understandably be an attempt to somehow ensure continuity of the control of the Dalai Lama lineage by the Tibetan exiles against the predations of the CCP throughout the forthcoming regency period. HHDL has made many hints in the past about alternatives ranging from an election process through to the discontinuance of the lineage. Right now it’s anyone’s guess as to what is being concocted by those in the inner cloister in Dharamsala, but JN la’s pen provides some insights.

    I fear the CCP will take advantage of any move by the Tibetan exiles away from a purely traditional selection process. The atheist CCP is not ashamed to use religious tradition as a means to an end. The CCP control present Panchen and Reting incarnations, so duplicate incarnations of the Dalai Lama are the most likely future scenario. However, I fear if the exiles decide on the discontinuance of the Dalai Lama lineage, or some radical new secular form of embodiment – or even, say, a pause in the lineage until Tibet is “free” – then there would be only one “traditional” Dalai Lama, a CCP one. Tibetans would largely reject a CCP selection, but why leave the door open to give the CCP such a useful gift and potential propaganda victory against the accusations of repressing Tibetan tradition and religion? With already existing duplicates in the available alternatives of the other schools, the situation resembles an unholy holy mess.

    I can appreciate that any alternative lineage and/or regency strategy might need to be kept under close wraps, but given the strategic failures, slights of hand and lack of foresight evident from the not too distant past, I’m not filled with great confidence that some masterstroke of genius will be revealed by Dharamsala upon the Dalai Lama’s passing that will then see the Dalai Lama lineage survive the next regency under exile control. This is a high-stakes chess match and the CCP seem a couple of moves ahead of you, with one greedy eye already on a checkmate a few moves away.

    Good exile Tibetan folks, you face many challenges. Hurling insults at each other, exhibiting blind faith, feigning emotional hurt, being wholly satisfied with “beginner-level” Democracy, wishing away transparency, resorting to sectarianism, bullying, intimidation, these sorts of behaviours … well they ain’t gonna help you. You need to start having more mature and rational discussions about alternatives AND the leadership needs to be seen to be mature and rational enough to allow these discussions. Moving to MULTI-PARTY DEMOCRACY AT THE NEXT ELECTIONS is therefore essential to ensure an environment where free and open debate can flourish.

    A final point: a very wise and wonderful Indian gentleman (who was close to the Tibetan cause and is sadly now deceased) opened my eyes to the need for the exile Tibetans to be very careful if they wish to not wear out their exile welcome and retain their standing and reputation as the World’s model refugees. Whether you are in an Indian settlement camp, in the West, or somewhere in between, openly investing in ostentatious status symbols such as gigantic houses, luxury cars, the very latest gadgets, etc. etc. are a sure way of creating animosity amongst those communities kind enough to be your sponsors and hosts. It does not look good to be asking for help and donations one moment and then turning up in a flash new Mercedes the next. It reeks of the shallow opportunistic streak that manifests in some in your society. By all means be successful – it is to be encouraged – but a bit of thoughtful restraint goes a long way. This applies to individuals as well as the leadership. You know what I mean. Think about it.

  72. Tsering Dolker | April 25th, 2013 | 11:01 pm

    Lobsang sangay ministry of propaganda is in full swing…

  73. Dawa | April 25th, 2013 | 11:16 pm

    Criticizing the critic is welcomed if that criticism is based on reason and rational analysis of the topic at hand and not personal attacks or the age old emotional blackmail of “hurt feelings” and “hurt images.”

  74. tenzin Dhonyoe | April 26th, 2013 | 12:30 am

    Those Tibetans who can read and comprehend Tibetan language are requested to read this piece by Kasur Thupten Lungrik, analyzing Jamyang Norbu-la’s writings.

    ttp://www.dhomay.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=388%3A2013-04-25&catid=27%3A2012-05-03-16-30-54

  75. theopagha | April 26th, 2013 | 1:50 am

    Well, I read it. It is not a response to this article but paraphrasing and cheery picking from JN earlier writings. If he really want to critique he can response to a single writing instead of critiquing all of JN article in one breath!!

    Anyway, he was successful in creating a new genre of writing too!! English and Tibetan quotes are used together all along, making it illegible for both Tibetan as well as English readers. I had cognitive apartheid after reading few paragraphs.

    Then, the title itself doesn’t interest anyone for it be a critique. For the sake of English readers, here is the title “Critique of Jamyang Norbu’s Blasphemous writings”. Well friends you decide, if you want to read it or not.
    It is not an analysis at all. Analysis should reflect both the virtue and shortcomings of an essay. Well of course you don’t expect to see virtue based on his title. His critique are mostly based on his religious zeal, emotion, faith and showcasing his complete devotion to HHDL. As some comment in Tibetan blog rightly said, “it is 30% about JN’s writing, and 70% HH’s biography”. Statistically, he mentions HH 45 times in his piece. Can we have a debate without bringing in HH, ever. Or are we all circumnavigating him?

  76. tsering dorjee | April 26th, 2013 | 3:15 am

    just to remind everyone that Tibet existed before Gaden Padrong and it will continue to exist beyond it. H.H has been dear to us and helped us beyond compare but Middleway path he espouses is a path to extinction and I cannot support such a plan, no matter how much I respect H.H personally.

  77. Nimalobsang | April 26th, 2013 | 6:23 am

    I am a tibetan but I am not feeling secure to work in a CTA office as many things i came to know that its politic.
    Eg. The Interview and test to get recruited again politics and concern about their relatives, The test paper get leaks, such things really a shame.
    Jayang la. But after reading your article, you have opened my eyes.
    we youth will always follow you.

    Bhod gyalo.

  78. Tagmo | April 26th, 2013 | 7:48 am

    Although it has a good rhetoric and insignificant real information,the essay has no much objective evidences based on truth. Many points are prejudice that reject dissidence from others. The quotations in this essay are partially decoded by speculation, not by integrated termination.
    I hope JN would improve that weakness next time.

  79. daveno | April 26th, 2013 | 8:03 am

    When the topic itself comes out of unstable emotions of a high school graduate…there isn’t much at hand for a rational reasoning or objective analysis.

    Western and developed nations who are helping financially knows very well how those doughs are spend and they knew well that PRIVATE PLANE/BMW/BULLOCK CARD RIDE are a sign of respect for the position that should stand close if not equal to the world leaders at our current time.

    someone mentioned that HHDL should cook his own dinner or do the laundry etc…shoot this stuff to your PRESIDENT/PRIME MINISTER/POPE OR HEAD OF YOUR RELIGION. And said HAVE A CHEESE WITH YOUR WHINNING to others….HAVE YOURSELF A CHURAA WITH CHANG!!

  80. ng | April 26th, 2013 | 8:32 am

    @theopagha: Jamyang Norbu could not write in Tibetan, so the author not just quoting his actual phrase, but also followed by actual Tibetan translation if your you have really read it. Your “cognitive apartheid ” occurred because you got probably intimidated and overwhelmed. It is also a sign of your disgust at the language your parents spoken and your forefathers survived with it. If you cannot read it, at the least show some respect. He is only able quote couple of JN’s earlier writings, there are many more as far as I can remember. This is a unsettling question. Tibetan cause is not a issue of pseudo intellectual exercise about a distant land like bombings in Iraq. Tibet needs to solution, but you neither expect solution from being idle at home and in the street, nor can you expect Tibetans inside start take up arms. The logic is street protest is nothing more than symbolism, Tibetans inside taking arms is nothing better than complete suicide. So, the choice is, whether you want them to die for your belief or you want them to have a good life. Jamyang Norbu should have been seen in this light. His recent writings or continuation of his angst of the past and personal grudges compounded by defeat of his aristocratic cousin Tethong. His politics is well hidden behind democracy, freedom, modernism, and geopolitics, not easy to detect for average minded people. Literate people might welcome because their mind is only respond to emotions rather than reasons. He is one of the guy who is hungry for fame, power, and anything he can do if his own interest is at stake. I don’t he really cares about Tibetans in Tibet. He uses them like a pawn in his own writing context as if he cares. The reason is he has no “stake” in the struggle. I meant “personal stake” because all his near and dear ones are transported to West long time ago. He has more stake at Tennessee than in Tibet. But Tennessee does not feed him, it is the distant Tibet that brings him fame and money.

  81. KP | April 26th, 2013 | 10:17 am

    Please note that those who are resorting to personal attacks against Jamyang la instead of focusing their comments on the subject will be monitored and their online activities will be reported to the DTTJI database.

  82. tenzin Dhonyoe | April 26th, 2013 | 10:35 am

    KP. However, those resort to character assassination) such as Jamyang Norbu and his supporters) of respected public figures will not be reported to the DTTJI database, because you are a brainless hypocrite.

  83. Sayadruk | April 26th, 2013 | 11:02 am

    I am not a regular visitor to Jamyang la’s blog, but as a patriotic Tibetan, I come here once in a while. This is an excellent piece like most of his writings are. I hope that Jamyang la will continue with his great service to the Tibetan community as long as possible. It is important that people like him live a long life. So I will keep him in my prayers, always. And I hope that many will join me in this prayer.

    I am encouraged by the level of participation this piece generated. So I decided to make my contribution to this piece. What is equally encouraging is the apparent two groups that emerged to make their cases. Most importantly, it made me extremely happy to see that the number of people who make their arguments based on sound reasoning and logic are on the rise. This bodes well for our cause.

    On numerous occasions, I have seen some people repeating their comments like a mantra. For instance, JN la always criticizes the CTA and HH. It is possible that I have missed, but I have not had the opportunity to see the critics of JN la laying out the weakness and/or holes in his criticism of anybody.

    To say that criticism hurts our unity, feelings of individuals, and that it makes our real enemy happy is simply disingenuous and contrary to truth. However, a few vested individuals engage in such a destructive strategy because they are fully aware that it does not take much for them to emotionally blackmail majority of our people. This is truly the unfortunate part of our society. What makes this worse is that our people are that gullible even in the 21st century. What this basically shows to the world community is that we have not changed much in the last 400 years.

    That is why, I am a supporter of the Middle Way Approach, but I support it for a different reason. The Tibetans were not blessed with any leader in the last few hundred years that truly cared for empowering us.

    Psychologically speaking, I have seen in my life that people who are always defensive, insecure, incompetent, and not willing to be transparent are the ones that are averse to criticism. Those are the types of people who are not willing to learn and grow in their lives. It is unfortunate that the Tibetan people have had such people as their leaders, historically.

    I know that no one likes to be called a hypocrite. In such a case, it is only fair to ask and expect people not to engage in activities that will show their hypocrisy. The point that I am trying to make is that if we were to stifle free speech and dissenting views on some flimsy grounds, how is this any different from what the Chinese authorities are doing in the name of hurting the stability of their society or whatever they call it. If we were to continue down this path in full throttle, it should be difficult for us to raise any of our accusatory fingers at our enemy. I agree with one of the participants who said that self-reflection is important. It is indeed so.

    One of the respondents discussed about shugden. I admit that I don’t have a good handle on this issue. I am sorry that I viewed shugden and their followers as evil at one point in my life based on HH’s speech. However, I have discarded this view a long time ago. If one should convince me with anything, I will always ask for empirical evidence. We made this group an outcast in our community. I will not dwell on what ensued then. It has been a long time since then. What is important for me to know and perhaps for many others is the outcome of that tragic decision to cause division in our community. Can ANYONE help me understand how measurably we have gained since that time? How is our overall community different before and after that time?

    I have heard about many families who lived in numerous Tibetan settlements for a long time since we got resettled in India. However, they had to flee their settlements for safety once the shugden issue was stoked. I can feel for them. I can empathize with them. It will be difficult for anyone to leave their village and /or settlement under such circumstances where they spent a good part of their lives, where they have good neighbors, friends, and what not.

    It is good to know that I am not the only person who found HH speech at Salugara inappropriate. He should completely stay away from politics. I understand that it is a human nature to be in a limelight for good or bad reasons. I have the highest respect for HH. He has had his opportunity to serve us for 60 long years. Everyone knows the outcome of his leadership. So I would like to request HH to completely refrain from making any political statements if he sincerely cares for us. Doing so will also help him because then Chinese authorities will not have evidence to prove their point that the whole devolution issue is a farce.

    I am not insinuating that HH should give up his individual rights along with the devolution of political power, but we all know that he is not an ordinary individual. One thing that I would like him to say, however, and say publicly and loudly is that the Tibetans in Tibet should refrain from burning themselves. I am confident that HH is highly capable of doing this and I hope he does it. It is heart wrenching every time I read news about self-immolations. Such acts are not necessary to realize our goals of middle path.

    Someone said that correlation is not causation. This is true. In the world of causal inference, people also say that correlation is not a sufficient condition for causation, but it is a necessary condition for causation. Am I trying to make this discussion lively? 🙂

    This is getting longer than I expected, I will continue later if I find time for it.

  84. Dawa | April 26th, 2013 | 11:42 am

    Thanks Sayadruk. It is so encouraging to read your comment. You said things that I wanted to say in a more coherent and comprehensive way than I can ever dream to do. I hope you do find time to write more here.
    If His Holiness was able to come out with what he said in Selagura I am sure there is nothing to hold him back from asking Tibetans in Tibet not to burn themselves. Not in a harsh way but in a way that shows he feels their anguish. Otherwise you know what will happen: They will be demonized and blamed for upsetting His Holiness. That will send this tragi-comedy of our present state that we Tibetans in exile created own our without much help from China to new heights.

  85. Dawa | April 26th, 2013 | 12:06 pm

    I read Kasur Thupten Lungril la’s review of JN’s articles of the previous ten or so years. Not this particular piece.
    Except for clever quotes from Sakya Lekshay etc and denunciation of what he calls “those who criticizes exile government and His Holiness” there is nothing much to go on. Quoting out of context and suggesting JN somehow is looking forward to a day when His Holiness is no more is so cheap. The whole thing sounds more like a renewing of a loyalty oath than anything else.

  86. Tashi | April 26th, 2013 | 12:18 pm

    Thupen lungrik article is not a piece of analytical.it is more of buttering up higher officials. Again repeated habits, in order to credits ur article you drag names that will polish u.

    Speak or not to speak,in the international stage,only scholar jamyangnorbu norbu is the one,through medium in English he stands ,writes and fight for tibet.

    Who else is there from Dhasa? Only praising hhdl and exile government for selfish reason.

  87. lang po | April 26th, 2013 | 12:22 pm

    JN- these types of critical papers is very much necessary to highlight our exile contemporary world. The TRUE FACT IS that we have more fractional issues in last few decades which subdue our long cherish goal of our people. And the next episode is obviously about the Rangzen v/s Umaylam. Which is indeed in danger to turning into provisional or cholka groupism rather than on the bases of ideology. It stinks in dharamsala or in our exile atmosphere.
    Some of the fact points –

    1 – The issue of the form of government ie sovereign monarch or presidential form etc was indeed discussed at the parliament, but the fact is that it wasn’t gone through each and every sides of it, and fact is that it shows our standard of parliamentarian. Rather than hiding in jungle of US and making argument, stand for MP, I can assure you can easily get the mandate.

    2 – You have written “I feel that it is absolutely important for his holiness —-his true political legacy —His true legacy, one for which he will be gratefully remember by his people, is his introduction of democratic governance to exile Tibetan society.” We are refugee’s administration whether you designated it as exile Tibetan administration or central Tibetan administration …., fully democratic rights can never ever prevail and we all should must understand the demarcation and limitations.

    3- If there are any possibilities for Tibetan to gain freedom, then only hope is his holiness and central Tibetan administration. People like JN or our brother Socrates are dreaming to match with HH is fooling themselves . His holiness reassurance as you have quoted ‘’ full confidence that it (the middle way approach) will produce result s in the future’’ His holiness assured and said “ will produce 100% result in the future’’ you have missed or intentionally deleted it. Whether it produce 100 percent result or not but his holiness is 100 % committed to it . …….. JN and others alliances proposes the rangzen through writing and the Umava by constitutional posts, this fractional is so high that it is apparent these days in exile parliament, recent south Indian Tibetan settlement chapters of TYC letter to central executive, chu-she- gangtuk meeting, attacking lobsang sengay through different means, foreigners involvement and criticizing our means are ridiculous etc etc etc ….

  88. Lhasawa | April 26th, 2013 | 12:33 pm

    http://www.facebook.com/LobsangYeshibodpa/posts/10151656501608474

  89. ng | April 26th, 2013 | 12:50 pm

    @What is the selfish reason?

    NG

  90. Tenzing | April 26th, 2013 | 2:52 pm

    Lang po la,

    “rather than hiding in jungle of USA and making arguement, stand for MP, I can assure you can easily get the mandate”

    your goal is to make politicians out of people so that they can be silenced.
    our attempt is to make leaders out of people so that there is a just, democratic and transparent government.

  91. theopagha | April 26th, 2013 | 5:01 pm

    @NG The way you spit your animosity in these comments seems you too have a huge unsettled similar personal grudge against JN as he does according to you; otherwise why drag all his family biography in this discussion. I am sorry if your family suffered much pain working for his aristocratic family back in Tibet!! In such case it is understandable or any unpaid dues for hard labor including not limited to manual cleaning of out-house.

    So NG, seriously one thing we should respect or at least acknowledge here is that we are commenting hiding behind the veil of pseudonyms, don’t now under what pretext or motives you or I have; he dare to speak as a man with a voice whether he is reasonable or not. Leave the personal attacks behind, if you really want to confront him, reveal your identity and I bet you can settle the arguments you are making for better or worse, and hopefully might get your unpaid dues. Otherwise don’t rant too much or might become a mockery yourself.

    As for Thupten Lungrig’s translation, you think he did justice? Being hardcore Buddhists, he doesn’t know the English name of the tree under which Buddha sat!! Six years!! He translates “Banyan tree” as “བྱང་ཆུབ་ལྗོན་ཤིང་ཆེན་མོ་” or “the great Bodhi tree”, he could have just said “Bodhi tree” why extra superlative. Linguists would argue that the additional superlative in the translation reflects personal instinctive beliefs, worldview that one is coming from.
    Ok let’s leave it here for now.

    P.S: if the Tibetan insertions confuses you, I am sorry. I acquired the new genre from TL!! Yeppy! Still wondering whats Banyan tree called in Tibetan……རྐང་མང་ or ནྱ་གྲོ་ད་ in Hindi (used by many early Tibetan scholars). Bet you learned something at least wasting time here.

  92. daveno | April 26th, 2013 | 9:00 pm

    I am very happy for HHDL made those comments on M-w in salugara, he should do so once in a while when undesirable elements are starting to emerge in our political cloud.

  93. Karma | April 26th, 2013 | 10:04 pm

    Jamyang norbu la put out many points to ponder over some I not agree on them for I voted for Lobsang Sangey la but it is still important to have other point of view. Lobsang Sangey la is doing good jobs that I see him doing since election and giving other officials important responsibilies. Someone said Dikyi Choyang la should run for Kalon tripa while I think she is capable person who speak so many languages beside Tibetan, English, French, mandarin, hindi she is still new to politics I feel and need more seasoning and who knows when lobsang sangey la has retired from politics she can be next but not for long whiles as I feel lobsang sangey la is doing great job. Also Jamyang Norbu la is doing great job too. We need discuss things in this way as this is what hhdl always says we need to take responsibility for our situation, we can’t count on him all the time to hold our hands I feel.
    Thanks you.

  94. Karma | April 26th, 2013 | 10:15 pm

    I fogot to say. I feel Lobsang Sangey la should be Prime Minister for life because he educated and is making lots of difference and now people from all over the world recognize and respect him, his high profile give me some pride to know that HHDL can feel relieve we have the perfect person leading the Tibetan fight against communist China for the long struggle and that is why I feel it would be best if he is in charge of Tibetan polity with full democracy that we can all be proud of.

  95. Dawa | April 26th, 2013 | 10:31 pm

    Karma
    I am hoping you are merely trying to get a rise out of people.

  96. tsering dorjee | April 26th, 2013 | 11:02 pm

    Jamyang Norbu statements have been proven to be true with the Siliguri statement being taken as divine utterance by Tibetan people and creating tension and friction within Tibetan community. Subtle threats are being made by our middleway peaceful people against those who refuse to give up Rangzen. If only othr people can see the fake smiles and devious minds hidden behind the Tibetan idea of non-violence. So has His holiness really retired or it is all fake. We all should be ashamed of playing in this stupid game where all the ending are already written and we pretend not to know anything about it.

  97. Katu | April 26th, 2013 | 11:07 pm

    JN la, in response to your quotation and comment” He “still retains a responsibility” can clearly be read to mean that He “still retains ultimate political power” in the Tibetan world,”

    I would like to tell u and readers to kindly listen to the tape where HHDL says ” Nga la legan yo re” So, how could you draw legan for ultimate power, infact all of us have a legan or inborn responsibility or duty for our cause which doesn’t mean all of us have ultimate power.

    Answering this one, I hope I don’t need to write more. rather I find them ad-hominen and self defeating ones. To Chinese Friends please do more research and don’t imbibe his words. To my Brother and sisters also, My request is also same.

  98. Karma | April 26th, 2013 | 11:13 pm

    Dawa la please dont thing I have time for games to play for nothing when you don’t know nothing about me. His Holiness said Lobsang Sangey la is his boss in politics and HHDL is his boss in spiritual stuffs so if Lobsang Sangey la is good enough for HHDL it is good enough for me and rest of Tibetans who love HHDL. I am not asking anyon e to agree with me but this is how I feel.

  99. Dawa | April 27th, 2013 | 1:14 am

    Ok. Karma la. I didn’t mean to be offensive. I was shocked by your wish to have LS as prime minister for life. If His Holiness said LS is his boss I hope he meant for the duration of LS’s term. If we are feeling nostalgic for monarchy might as well select a former aristocrat. At least they have class and there won’t a danger of our new king flashing gold crusted alarm clock around his neck. This saving our image in the world which we care so much more than anything else.

  100. Tsering Dolker | April 27th, 2013 | 3:24 am

    Welcome to the Tibetan Matrix. Here we pretend to have democracy and His holiness pretend to retire. The prime minister pretend to be somebody when he is just like a private secretary following HH around like a puppy. The parliament pretend to be impartial but amazingly always come to the same consensus as Penpa Tsering. The Chinese pretend to have negotiations while the Tibetans pretend to accomplish something each time. When will we awaken and become Neos ? Never is probably the correct answer. Sad sad times.

  101. Gyamtso Kyab | April 27th, 2013 | 8:26 am

    This is just a test. Some one is trying to compromise my mail

  102. umaylam gyalgur chek | April 27th, 2013 | 9:00 am

    JN, Don’t ever try to breakup Tibetan Unity. You are writing so many pointless things to disunity the Tibetan. WHo are You? In the history of Tibet, present His Holiness the Dalai Lama has done the maximum service to the Tibetan people. The democracy that u r enjoying is all because of him only. The basic thinking that u have and education that u receives is all because of him only. Tibetans were not unify whole in past, but we are now unity under His Holiness the great 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet. I know your attempt and motive. you motive is to get some fame and post in rangzen regime, you attempt is to divide the people by sweet talks and money power… You are worst than anything, its shame on you who misuse little knowledge.. you labelled Central Tibetan Administration as “criminal organisation”. Frankly speaking u don’t know much about democracy? u simply go after western definition. Poor and infamous jamyang norbu, don’t ever try to breakup the Tibetan unity with karma chophel…. Hi rangzen is not your private company. with the help of few foreign frds and American funds, you and karma chophel are now a day trying to get into business and power politic in the name of ranzen…. I know You and Your frd karma chophel both are so hungry in getting post. Here im not criticising all the rangzen activists, im criticising you and your co business partner karma choephel…. Phayul,com has published your article title Tibet’s next reincarnation. I know the editor of phayul.com is sherab woeser, he is son of your partner karma chophel.

  103. theopagha | April 27th, 2013 | 12:04 pm

    @102 Umaylam.
    Please keep your preposterous thoughts to yourself. If a single article like this can break the unity of Tibetan people, then our meaning of unity is too ‘shallow’. While you can definitely say that JN will forever rot in the hell realm, given your pseudo religious name!

    By the way I hope you understand the semantics of your name ‘Umaylam’. It is Buddhist philosophical term meaning middle way, a path that neither falls into existentialism or nihilism. Which is a great argument in philosophical debates but the reality is much different and it will take forever to realize such meaning for the communists.

    Thanks for your outlandish thoughts about Karma Chophel and JN Inc. If you can tell me where their money power is being distributed, I would be happy to join the Inc. Right now!

    Lastly, if you attribute everything you have, you do, you plan to achieve, your stupidity to His Holiness, then you are going against the very Buddhist’s logic and definition of karma. Where are all the individual actions? Or did you just sat there praying all this time. Are you a theist or atheist? I believe Buddhists are atheist, but I don’t know you.

  104. tenzin Dhonyoe | April 27th, 2013 | 2:11 pm

    @100: While, Tsering Dolkar, you pretends to be making a difference with your cynicism and by offering some unbalanced negative remarks towards our institutions and leaders through the virtual world of true matrix that you seem to live in! Tell me some constructive things that you have done for your community and your cause in stead of vomiting venom around. We will then take you seriously. You live in a sad sad world of your own creation! True Tibetan heros live vibrantly in times of challenge by being proactive!

  105. 唯色 | 嘉央諾布:圖伯特的下一個化身? - 中国数字时代 | April 27th, 2013 | 3:45 pm

    […] 作者:嘉央諾布(Jamyang Norbu) 翻譯:更桑東智(@johnlee1021) 來源:影子圖伯特(Shadow Tibet) 原文發表時間:2013年4月22日 […]

  106. Tsering Topgyal | April 27th, 2013 | 5:10 pm

    Thank you Jamyang la for this wonderful piece,I am disappointed by the degree of venom that some on this blog have directed towards you and also quite puzzled by others who defend the One Policy slogan that Dhasa is espousing which unfortunately is common in countries like China and Syria.

    last evening while watching a TV show (the hour) Freddie Lyon a presenter at the show offers some beautiful lines that fits into what we Tibetans are facing presently:

    “Ladies and Gentleman,if we cannot debate that which troubles our society and more importantly that troubles our government,then we cannot in all honesty call ourselves a democracy.
    If we cannot reasonably and intelligently query our government about the rightness of an action that at heart appears to be deceitful..then we are not a Free………”

  107. umaylam gyalgur chek | April 28th, 2013 | 2:55 am

    @theopaghe, Listen carefully, First about karma choephel and his funding, he was a chetue from utsang but due to this remarks during end of previous term he was not elected by public of utasng. His hunger for chair is open secret, so he started making friend with shamarpa a kagyue controversial lama, his money power runs maharastra congress led late vilas rao deshmuk government too. Therefore, now a day karma chophel is also getting fund from shamar to dis stabilised the tibetaan community. Indian intelligence office several time disclosed in press that china is funding sugten tsokpa, sugtentsokpa is closly link with shamarpa, shamarpa’s political weapon to disunifying the Tibetan society is karma chophel and karma chophel and jamyang norbu are now close frd. Moreover, USA’s hidden policy is not to resolved Tibet issue as it was once clear from wekileak documents, rather Tibet issue remain in freeze so that USA can use that for any policy and relation bargain with china in now and for future.So jamyang norbu is one who is getting fund from US some non governmental organisation. Their aim is to break up the Tibetan society, but so unfortunately there are still people like Theopaghe, tsering dolkar etc etc going after their sweet talks and writing. see, jn’s writing looks beautiful English but no practical. so far he hasn’t done anything practically useful to our cause or to our people, rather, criticising without proof and evidence…. poor jn, indirectly he is misusing the basic freedom of speech.

  108. umaylam gyalgur chek | April 28th, 2013 | 3:03 am

    FOR YOUR KIND NOTICE TO ALL THE VIEWERS, YESTERDAY I HAVE POSTED TWO DIFFERENT COMMENTS, ONE IS THERE, BUT TODAY ANOTHER ONE IS INVISIBLE ON THE SCREEN. IT WAS POSTED YESTERDAY MORNING BUT IT WAS VISIBLE TILL EVENING, BUT NOW IT GOT DELETED DELEBRATELY BY JN. HE HIMSELF IS ON FIRE WHEN SOMEONE CRITICISED HIM DIRECTLY WITH PROOF. POOR JN,YOU STILL NEED TO LEARN HOW TO RESPECT THE FREEDOM OF SPEECH. BIG MOUTH IS NOT SUFFICIENT MR, PRACTICAL IS MORE IMPORTANT… SO, YOU HAVE TO FACE THE REALITY.

  109. Tashi | April 28th, 2013 | 11:19 am

    Umaylam,
    Are u kidding me? U r a sick person. U point fingers at JN.
    Look at ur writings baseless accusation. When u want to express your opinion in jn blogs please first look in the mirror and think at first.

    You say one thing to others that is bad,and u r doing the same. It is like monkey stealing the foods with covering the eye.

  110. Tashi | April 28th, 2013 | 11:23 am

    Umaylam,
    Do u have any proof to show karma chophel/ shamar/ shrug den tsokpa.

    U accuse jamyangnorbu criticized without proof and evidence.

    Now look at ur comment.

    Ha ha. Full of crap.

  111. Tsering Dolker | April 28th, 2013 | 12:29 pm

    Umelam, you guys are like the Chinese agents trying to destabilize our community by creating unnecessary division while u talk about Unity and Dok Tsa Chik Dre while you beat others for not walking your path. You people are shameless hypocrites. After successfully alienating Shudgen followers by marking them evil and ostracizing them and driving them away, your own people!! Now you guys are busy trying to make Rangzen people the new Shugden group and do the same. How can you accuse Chinese of hypocrisy when you do the very same thing in a monks robe? Shameful pricks!

  112. Dawa | April 28th, 2013 | 12:50 pm

    Right on Tsering Dolkar. Nobody seems to want to touch Shugden topic. I hope this evil in our society will get an in depth study and airing out in something like the Bo ki Duebab or Time magazine even.

  113. Dawa | April 28th, 2013 | 12:51 pm

    I mean the evil of alienating a group of people based on their belief which we don’t want the chinese to do to us.

  114. ng | April 29th, 2013 | 2:53 pm

    Dorjee Shugden:

    http://thedorjeshugdengroup.wordpress.com/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorje_Shugden_controversy

    Jamyang Norbu’s public position on Shugden:

    “Thankfully, after a couple of weeks CTA officials, also myself and others, managed to convince the Japanese press that His Holiness had absolutely no relationship with the cult leader and that the audience in Dharmshala was a just a single routine event. But even now the big lie about His Holiness’s relationship to Asahara is used by China’s propagandists in the West and by Shugden devotees in their counter-attacks against CTA. Just having the truth on your side is not enough. It is nearly impossible to fully contain a scandal once it has broken out.”

    From: http://www.jamyangnorbu.com/blog/2012/12/03/protect-kundun-%E2%80%93-free-rfa/

    NG

  115. tibetan | April 29th, 2013 | 4:51 pm

    HELLO EVERYBODY.. THE ISSUE IS JAMYANG NORBU WANTS TO BE THE SIKYONG. AND SFT AND ALL RANGZEN ACTIVISTS ARE HIS FANS.. MOST RANGZEN ACTIVISTS LOVE AGU JAMYANG NORBU..THEY DON´T CARE ABOUT SIKYONG OR TIBETAN GOVT IN EXILE OR TIBTANS IN GENRAL.. THEY ONLY POST HIS HOLINESS PICTURE TO PLAY SAFE GAME.. BUT THE BIG GAME IS ALL RANGZEN ACTIVISTS WANTS TO FORM THEIR OWN GOVT WHERE JAMYANG NORBU WILL BE THE KING, PRESIDENT, PM AND ALL RANGZEN ACTIVIST WILL BE MINISTERS. HAHA WHAT A JOKE, CHINA AND NEPAL WILL BE LAUGHING THEIR ASSES OFF ON US…

  116. tsering topgyal | April 29th, 2013 | 5:25 pm

    Tashi Wangchuk la’s article at Tibet Sun is a good read,it offers a glimpse of Jamyang la and the troubles we are facing in exile at this crucial moment.

    http://www.tibetsun.com/opinions/2013/04/28/a-true-son-of-tibet

  117. MiddleWay So COMASSIONATE wiling to sell your mother to the highest bidder | April 29th, 2013 | 5:28 pm

    Middle Way people are so kind hearted and compassionate that they want to give up Tibetan independence to the Chinese. As though Tibet is their personal inheritance. Also as His Holiness the Dalai Lama has said Tibetans want money and so they are going to the US to get “rich” so CTA and its flock of sheep might as well sell our country to China since China is rising in the world and getting rich. How profound in every way! After all, Buddha Dharma and getting rich are the only two factors that matter to Tibetans. APPARENTLY.
    Let’s own up that we think, nay know, that our brand of Buddhism (Mahayana: Greater Vehicle) is superior to Hinayana (the so called lesser vehicle) not to mention all the other faiths. This self indulgent religion is so foreign to the Buddha. I think if Buddha were around he will turn pale to the roots of his hair to see his teaching has turned to this ALL IMPORTANT monster that takes precedence over every thing. sans modesty. sans humility. sans genuineness. The only genuineness that’s coming out of Dharamsala is genuine desire to relinquish Tibet.
    Those who read Jamyang Norbu’s block are his fans. At least we are not awestruck by China’s material progress. If anybody makes China happy and stifle giggles it’s you monkeys who have no principle. And you are peeing in the pants awestruck by sky scrapers and macnodalds in China. And your little vicious mantra reciting selves are pitiful and contemptible.

  118. Gyamtso Kyab | April 29th, 2013 | 7:26 pm

    It pained be greatly to read the last post, but I doubt if my angst get acrpss as I am still under apparent cyber attack.

  119. The Owl | April 29th, 2013 | 9:21 pm

    “RTYC Bylakuppe President Janyal Lhakyap speaks during the meeting of the four RTYC chapters in South India to discuss the Dalai Lama’s Salugara speech and the International Rangzen Conference, in Bylakuppe, India, on 17 April 2013.”

    “Members of the four Regional Tibetan Youth Congress (RTYC) chapters of South India have called on the TYC central office to convene an emergency meeting to discuss the recent speech by the Dalai Lama in Salugara.” to “….change Independence to Middle Way.”

    Horray!!

    The Tibetan kangaroo court style democracy “given to us by that ‘completely retired’ Dalai Lama” is at it again. His “opinions” are once again being taken as sublime truth by the rabid fundamentalists. They are eager to force everyone to adhere to the retired priest’s childish sermons, and that, henceforth, all contrary views will not be tolerated within the Tibetan community on pain of social ostracization, just as the same tactic was used on those poor Shugden worshipers by the Dalai Lama and his fundies making them social parasites.

    No matter, I am sure all Tibetans will take it up the ass like we always do.

  120. Sangay | April 29th, 2013 | 10:59 pm

    I find Jamyang la capitalizing the ‘H’ in ‘He’ in referring to His Holiness as a complete sign of deep respect that he always has had. Thank you for truly understanding His Holiness in the light that he wants us to. Kadring Che!

  121. TIGER | April 30th, 2013 | 1:41 am

    the owl keeps a desperate blind faith in jamyang norbu. DAT´S WAT I CALL BLIND FAITH THAT U N MANY RETARDED KEEP IN HIM…

  122. tsering dorjee | April 30th, 2013 | 3:23 am

    H.H said there will be 400 million Chinese buddhists who want his teachings. That is all well and good but what has that got to do with Tibetan independence? He also gave the example of King-Priest relationship without realizing that is the very reason why we are in this mess in the first place. The 13th Dalai tried to take us out of that mess. What has economy has to do with national soverngty? We are talking about the survival of the nation, not recruiting buddhists for buddhism.That is why you need to separate the two because that is how your reasoning get illogical. And why wouldn’t the CHinese intellectuals say giving up your country is beneficial for them. They are not thinking about Tibetans but about themselves alone. Identifying youself as a minority under China will surest way of destroying the last traces of tibetan identity.

  123. མགོ་ནག་སྐྱིད་སྡུག་གནམ་གི་ལག་ | April 30th, 2013 | 4:44 am

    Hi Jamyang la

    these years you have been turning so so annoying and bull-shit…what the fucking wrong medicine that you had….Jesus Christ!…so many articles written by youself, just these days are really baseless and more stupid than Chinese Propaganda in terms of the research and analysis’s strategies…

    Please…clam-down and raising your Pen again…but not continuous to shit…

  124. MiddleWay So COMASSIONATE wiling to sell your mother to the highest bidder | April 30th, 2013 | 1:41 pm

    Yes. clam down Jamyang Norbu so we can have a thriving oligarchy.

  125. Tenzing | April 30th, 2013 | 4:02 pm

    I’m sure HH wouldn’t want any self appointed vigilantes to clamp down on the Rangzen activists.because then you know you’re creating negative cause and conditions. As an individual HH is stating his preference for the middle way. In fact, with Rangzen voice loud and clear, HH’s middle way will have more effect. otherwise Middle-way remains like a No-way, stagnant and we can go on like this for another 50 years. The neo chinese buddhists want to silence the voice of Tibetans because its very embarrasing and shameful for them when Tibetans are shouting “CHINA LIES, TIBETAN DIES” in the west. But the solution to their discomfort is not to cosy upto HHDL and try to silence the Tibetans but to put pressure on the CCP (chinese Capitalist Party).Tibetans are not stupid.

  126. Rigzin | April 30th, 2013 | 6:21 pm

    I think it is very important to raise these issues that will affect where we as Tibetans go from here, and over the years JN has undoubtedly been one lone voice to do so, however I don’t necessarily agree with every thing that he has to say. Condemning the man and his words is not the way forward. There were episodes in the past where these men came under mob attack spurred on by few malicious individuals in our society. I don’t read too much into what JN has to say, and tease apart each and every word of his in attempt to denounce the man and label him as anti this and that. There are many valid points that are brought up here, urgent matters that needs to be discussed if our society is to progress and then there are some points that can be testy and contentious. As I write this I feel disconnected with what is happening in Dharamsala or what our Sikyong is up to. What do I care if it is Sikyong, President or His Eminence? Politics and especially ours in exile is beyond the realm of ordinary man. I couldn’t begin to fathom it. It is also a very sensitive issue with faith being such a dominant force in our society. And that faith which is very deeply-rooted among Tibetans is used as a trump card to condemn an individual or a fraction that don’t share the same set of beliefs. This open up a whole new can of worms. It is a fine line. Where do you draw that line? What does it mean for us as Tibetans ? Our identities which is intertwined with faith like no other? Where does that put us in a modern society? What does future hold for Tibetans? Who would fill the void after HH The Dalai Lama? I don’t have answers to these questions and no one does. We are traversing unknown territories here. I appreciate JN directing the youth towards a more open society where issues can be discussed without fear of being shunned and ostracized. That should be the take home message for all Tibetans. That’s what we should strive for. But no, that’s not the case. Difficult times like this should bring the best out of us but no that’s not the case. Everyone has a solution up their sleeve which they would vehemently defend and also go to the length of condemning and thrashing someone if not acquiesced. Fractions are created to serve one’s purpose. There is not going to be a heroic feat from one individual who will rescue us all. In fact there are no heroes or supreme leaders. It is not a plot out of a movie. Let us not fantasize and transmogrify anyone. It will take the collective effort of ordinary Tibetans both inside and outside Tibet to see through this difficult period in the history of Tibet.

  127. Freedom Now! | April 30th, 2013 | 8:26 pm

    Good articles by two modern Tibetans cautioning us against blind faith.

    Tenzin Nyinjey -To Think Independently is More Important than Dogma
    http://www.rangzen.net/

    And Mountain Phoenix – Kiss Mo & Co Goodbye!

    http://mountainphoenixovertibet.blogspot.ca/

  128. tenzin Dhonyoe | April 30th, 2013 | 9:22 pm

    For an informed discussion and rebuttal of Jamyang Norbu-la’s article, read the following piece by Dr. Tenzin Dorjee. As far as I am concerned, there is no personal attack of the sort that many in both the camps in this forum engage in. His argument are clear and simply stated. This is the spirit of discussion that we should foster in a democracy.

    By Dr. Tenzin Dorjee, Ph.D. (Department of Human Communication Studies, California State University at Fullerton) April 28, 2013.

    This article, “Tibet’s Next Incarnation? Constitutional Crisis, Confusion and Conspiracies at the Central Tibetan Administration” by Jamyang Norbu la, contains some serious opinions about democracy, leadership, and policy in Tibetan diaspora. To start off, I am in favor of informed discussion about matters that concern our present and future issues. It is crucial for effective functioning and decision making in democratic system. In regard to the article, I have discussed a couple of issues from a different perspective.

    One, the author contests Dr. Lobsang Sangay’s claim that he is ““Sikyong – the democratically elected head of the Tibetan people and political successor to His Holiness the Dalai Lama” by reminding the reader: Public memory is short so I think everyone should remind themselves that Lobsang Sangay la was elected on 26 April 2011 as the kalon tripa or the prime-minister of the exile government. That was it. Nothing more, nothing less. Just a prime-minister, or Kalon Tripa if you like. Reasonably stated, Dr. Sangay simply argues for the legitimacy of his political leadership based on the historical continuity of political leadership from His Holiness the Dalai Lama to him. Nothing more; nothing less. However, the author seems to take issue with the historical legitimacy of Sikyong’s political leadership. Unfortunately, he resorts to speculation and ridicule (attend to the tone of writing) Sikyong by asking: Is he the manifestation of the “Madhey Trulku” option that His Holiness the Dalai Lama mentioned some years ago, where His Holiness would manifest an alternative emanation before his own passing? The author further states: If the Sikyong is “the political successor to His Holiness the Dalai Lama” and he might furthermore be “Tibet’s Next Incarnation” as his officially approved biographical documentary appears to suggest, then we are in a far deeper constitutional cesspit than if the change were only one from prime-minister to president, which though problematic enough, does not carry with it the many theological questions (and perils) inherent in a system that is based more on metaphysical than on constitutional principles.

    His Holiness the Dalai Lama has devolved his political power to elected leadership and returned to his spiritual role following the foot-steps of the first few predecessors in the line of Dalai Lama. In making this historic decision he has also separated the Church and the State embodied in the leadership from the Great Fifth to the Great Fourteenth Dalai Lamas. Given this new socio-political Tibetan context, the “Madhey Trulku” option has nothing to do with our present or future Sikyong – political leadership. His Holiness has made it clear that there is no rush to make any decision about his future reincarnation. Whatever options he chooses when the right time and circumstances arise it all relates to his future incarnation as the spiritual head of Tibet and Tibetans. Period. The author has mixed the spiritual and political issues based on the title of documentary film about Dr. Lobsang Sangay: “The Outsider: Tibet’s Next Incarnation?” As far as the writer can tell, Tibet’s Next Incarnation has nothing to do with Dr. Sangay’s leadership. It would be wise for the film makers to rethink about the appropriateness of the current title of their documentary.

    Two, the author takes issue with His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s statement made during a teaching in Salugara, North India, on March 29, 2013. The author states: His Holiness is, of course, correct in his assertion that his people continue to place their faith in him, but the second part of the remark that He “still retains a responsibility” can clearly be read to mean that He “still retains ultimate political power” in the Tibetan world, especially on the issue of the Middle Way Approach, where He appears to be suggesting that no change in policy would be tolerated. Again the author’s personal interpretation of His Holiness’ statement does not bear evidence. Since His Holiness has devolved his political power he has largely refrained from making political statements and often deferred news reporters to Sikyong – the new political Tibetan leader. While restating his three commitments, His Holiness makes it clear to the world that he is not the political head of Tibetans, however, he feels personal responsibility as a Tibetan and also a spokesperson for Tibetans because they put their faith in him. In this regard, he “still retains a responsibility” as he feels towards Tibet and Tibetans. There is no ground and it is not right to rewrite his statement into “still retains ultimate political power” in the Tibetan world…” He has devolved his complete political power to the elected leadership and the world knows it and appreciates his bold and altruistic decision and action.

    Furthermore, the author writes: If such is the case and that if “two years” after the Dalai Lama’s retirement Tibetan cannot have an open and frank debate on the success or failure of His signature national policy, it makes the whole claim of Tibetan exile democracy a bad joke. It also gives credence to China’s repeated accusations of the Dalai Lama’s insincerity and dishonesty. A Wall Street Journal report mentioned that “China has dismissed the Dalai Lama’s retirement as a ‘trick’ designed to impress the international community.” The author seems to suggest that His Holiness has put a great wall on having an open and frank debate on the success or failure of his signature national policy – the Middle Way. This is very unfortunate statement the author has made to say the least. His Holiness is on the record to say that ultimately Tibetans will decide about Tibet issues and he is all for transparency of matters. While His Holiness initiated the Middle Way idea, it was deliberated upon in Tsogchen (General Body Meetings) and Chithue (Tibetan Parliament) by the representatives of the Tibetan people and adopted it as our national policy. If we, the Tibetan people, failed in our responsibilities to engage in open and frank discussions on such matters it is ultimately our own failures. Let’s face it. Contrary to the author’s claim, we see open discussions on Tibetan issues in our diaspora. Recent formation of Bod Gyal Yong Rangzen Lhantsog (Tibetan National Congress) and Rangzen meetings in Dharamsala and in the West attest to the freedom of speech and open discussion about matters of importance to all of us. Also, Chithue Karma Choephel la’s personal statement for Rangzen on the floor of Tibetan Parliament reflects the freedom of speech and safeguard of that freedom.

    His Holiness has served Tibet and Tibetans from his teenage age to senior age during the most difficult period in our long history. The democracy he has provided us, and that the author recognizes as his real legacy, alone is the gift that cannot be repaid in same measure. His Holiness has asked for nothing in return for himself despite his inestimable sacrifices and contributions to the very survival and thriving of Tibetan diasporic community, identity, culture, community, and Tibetan issue. His Holiness has done more than his share of responsibility and now it is our responsibility to manage our national affairs. The future of Tibet is not in His Holiness’ hands, it is in the hands of Tibetan people, especially the younger generation. Let’s be grateful to His Holiness for everything he has done and commit to do our parts. It is best when we make decision and undertake actions based on an informed understanding of Tibetan issues from multiple perspectives.

  129. Tsering Topgyal | April 30th, 2013 | 11:01 pm

    Tenzin Dhonyoe
    When you write:
    “there is no personal attack of the sort that many in both the camps in this forum engage in. His argument are clear and simply stated. This is the spirit of discussion that we should foster in a democracy”

    How is it possible for you to make an intelligent appeal on the true spirit of discussion free of name calling when you have engaged in personal attacks on others on this blog?

    As for the article that you have written: ” For an informed discussion and rebuttal of Jamyang Norbu-la’s article, read the following piece by Dr. Tenzin Dorjee”
    I would not classify it as ‘informed” nor would I consider it a “rebuttal”.

    Tenzin Dorjee has two points of argument regarding Jamyang Norbu’s article,the first on Dr.Sangay’s historical continuity of political leadership from His Holiness the Dalai Lama to him and the second on His Holiness retirement from political role.
    The difference between the writings from both Jamyang Norbu and Tenzin Dorjee are quite obvious,Jamyang la has in detail explained his arguments and Dorjee la has taken snippets from the article to make his,this could be classified as intellectually dishonest.
    As for the last paragraph of Tenzin Dorjee’s article,one could consider it to be a variant slogan that most Tibetans feel duty bound to write.

  130. The Owl | May 1st, 2013 | 2:15 am

    Tenzin Dorjee (like many of his ilk) has evoked what I would call, The Official Doctrine. We have all heard it countless times from CTA, Dr. Lobsang Sangay, the Dalai Lama himself, various pro Middle Way writers, world leaders, media, etc. The Official Doctrine goes like this. “His Holiness the Dalai Lama has completely devolved his political power to the elected leadership and returned to his spiritual role.”

    Anyone who has taken even a vague interest in Tibetan politics can clearly see that such disingenuous statement is a boldface lie akin to China’s denial of massive cyber espionage around the world, where Chinese officials repeatedly deny and counter by saying, “No China does not do such a thing, hacking is illegal in China!”

    Alas. when it comes to lying, in the name of politics, there is no new thing under the sun, and Tenzin Dorjee demonstrates this jargon most adroitly.

    I have disagreed with JN’s allegation regarding the “cult of personality” and taken him to task for it, others too have their disagreements with him, and that is as it should be, as long as we make an effort to be honest with ourselves, honest with our fellow Tibetan brothers and sisters who may be reading or participating in this forum.

    Now I don’t want to bog down with, he said, she said, so I will stick to making only two points, and if you, Tenzin Dhonyoe, don’t consider yourself as just another Tibetan version of Chinese 50cent propagandist, I hope you will be good enough to answer my query in the “spirit of discussion” (“that we should foster in a democracy”), as you put it.

    1. If as Tenzin Dorjee asserts, that “His Holiness the Dalai Lama has completely devolved his political power to the elected leadership” and “In making this historic decision he has also separated the Church and the State” then, why is the Dalai Lama talking politics at a religious gathering, whipping up the crowd into a frenzy til members of the four Regional Tibetan Youth Congress (RTYC) chapters of South India is convening an “emergency meeting” due to the “Dalai Lama’s Salugara speech”?

    2. If as Tenzin Dorjee affirmed, that “His Holiness the Dalai Lama has completely devolved his political power to the elected leadership” then, why is CTA and Sikyong Lobsang Sangay(the elected leadership)constantly insisting that “China must have dialogue with His Holiness?

  131. Katia Pisetzky | May 1st, 2013 | 7:29 am

    I agree that Jamyang Norbu’s ability to analyze and offer profound insights, where most take things either at face value or are stuck on the cosmetics of the seeming status quo in exile, is far reaching and yet to be seen in the new generation of writers/critics.

    There is one more fact not mentioned in the article above, which makes Lobsang Sangay’s term of rule seem like an “incarnation,” adding to the religious character cum totalitarian leadership.

    Lobsang Sangay won a majority of votes largely due to his appeal of ‘ethnic’ locality that has majority representation in the Tibetan clergy in exile at present. 90% of the monks are Khamba. Lobsang Sangay specifically emphasized his local roots as identity politics, thereby ensuring the full support of the majority of the clergy. Anyone wishing to conduct a research and count is more than welcome to do so.

    Not only then, did he manage to secure his power thanks to this cunning, but he also actually laid the perfect foundations of a cult of personality. Moreover, having the majority support of the religious corpus of Tibetan society in exile, he actually also initiated a growing link between himself, his position, and his religious symbolism as incarnation.

  132. rikdzin | May 1st, 2013 | 8:30 am

    Jamyang Norbu a national Treasure? wtf in league with Mr. Xiao boa? you kidding me? JN is merely using his pen to promote his cousin. He’s a national shame.

  133. Kalsang Phuntsok | May 1st, 2013 | 8:36 am

    Here is my observation of Tibetan Democracy:

    Q. How many times the word “Democracy’ appear in the Kashag’s statement on the 52nd Democracy Day?

    Answer: 18

    Q. How many times the phrase “His Holiness..” appear in the same statement?

    Answer: 20

    Read the statement here: http://tinyurl.com/cf4tgc7

  134. Dawa | May 1st, 2013 | 10:37 am

    It will be a healthier society if we separate church and state like many other countries have done. Mixing politics and religion is recipe for disaster and disharmony as you have seen in the Middle East.
    Then we can have an honest discussion without fear of stepping on somebody’s faith-toes.

  135. Sayadruk | May 1st, 2013 | 12:01 pm

    #128 Tenzin Dhoneyoe la,

    Is it the shorter version of Dr. Dorjee’s writing or is it the full version? If it is the full version, I would expect a better piece than that from someone who has a doctorate degree. This should not be considered as a rebuttal. It is not intended to be so. Also, it is not intended to be a comprehensive feedback. My purpose is to share how Dr. Dorjee’s piece could have been better. I am going to explain how. I must admit that his piece has some important messages.

    When you are critiquing anyone’s work, it does not mean that your focus should solely be on the weakness(es) of that work. It is important to include both the strong and weak points. You may not like the other person you are talking about, but it is important to have moral integrity to acknowledge the good work of others, while one should not hesitate to point out flaws, of course with the intention to further our cause. Apparently, Dr. Dorjee was focused purely on one side of the coin. However, I do not think that that was his intention. Based on his writing, I am confident that he can do better in the future.

    Dr. Dorjee writes, “it would be wise for the film makers to rethink about the appropriateness of the current title of their documentary.” I agree partially with him on this. The film makers do have the responsibility to come up with an appropriate title, but it is not right to assign the entire blame to the film makers. The CTA and Sikyong equally erred in this. They should have given this suggestion to the film makers before people started talking about this documentary. It would be difficult for me to believe that, if no one else, at least Sikyong, with his educational background, did not foresee the controversy the title of this documentary could create.

    Another quote from the author, “…however, he feels personal responsibility as a Tibetan and also a spokesperson for Tibetans because they put their faith in him.” He canno be a freelance spokesperson of the Tibetan people because that is not acceptable in a democratic system. That is not acceptable because accountability is the key. Do I think he will make the best spokesperson in the world? You bet. If he has any serious interest in becoming a spokesperson of the Tibetan people, it is imperative that he become accountable to the elected leader. This will mean that he cannot discuss any policy issues without an explicit approval from the elected leader.

    Yet another quote, “the author seems to suggest that His Holiness has put a great wall on having an open and frank debate on the success or failure of his signature national policy – the Middle Way.” This is simply the author’s interpretation. Of course, I do not share this interpretation. Having disagreement on certain interpretations could always happen and it is not a big deal. The real question to be tackled is, is HH erecting a great wall that impedes open and frank discussions on any significant issues facing the Tibetan world? I do not think so. I am confident that that is not HH intention. However, the reality of the matter is that HH constant propagation of the Middle Way Policy, especially after he has fully retired from his political life, has this very unintended consequence. Shying away from the reality will not help us overcome any problems in our lives. Being a man of honor, it will help HH enhance his own credibility, and most importantly, it will enhance our common cause if he will keep his own words and stay away from politics completely.

    One more quote, “…alone is the gift that cannot be repaid in same measure.” What more can we do to His Holiness? Can you help us understand under what circumstances would you consider as a sufficient repayment? It is important for you to come up with some kind of a definition for repayment when you made that statement I just quoted. HH has done the best he could for us. He gave his best. There is no question about it. However, in return, he was awarded immense respect by the Tibetan people, enjoyed the comfort of life no one could, and built reputation for himself worldwide with the support and blessings of the Tibetan people. What more can we do? By the way, what we have to understand is that what he did to us was his responsibility as a leader who ruled us for 60 long years.

    “His Holiness has done more than his share of responsibility and now it is our responsibility to manage our national affairs.” I couldn’t agree more with you on this. He had a virtually free hand in leading us for 60 long years. Just create two columns, one for success and another for failure(s) and fill the two columns. It should not be difficult for anyone to assess the outcomes of his leadership. HH is continuing to do more by making political statements even after fulfilling his share of responsibilities, which doesn’t bode well for our overall cause. I hope you will agree with me on this. If you go after people the way you did with this writing, it would obstruct productive citizens from performing their duties.

    Last quote, “it is best when we make decision and undertake actions based on an informed understanding of Tibetan issues from multiple perspectives.” Again, I couldn’t agree more with you on this. It is very clear that your views are entirely different from that of JN la. I do not see any specific threats in any of the views espoused by the two Tibetans scholars. I am always for multiple perspectives. However, you do not seem to encourage multiple perspectives based on your writing even though you preach it. This was my take, but I apologize if this was not an accurate interpretation.

    In conclusion, I would expect another piece from Dr. Dorjee wherein he addresses some of the concerns I have raised here.

  136. Sayadruk | May 1st, 2013 | 12:50 pm

    #111 Tsering Dolker

    I understand your sentiment about the shugden issue. What happened to the followers of shugden was sad and unfair. Getting displaced from your home for the second time in lives cannot be fun. They had to flee their villages and settlements for their safety leaving behind good neighbors, friends, and memory where they spent a good part of their lives. This is a stain on the exile history. It is a national stain.

    It is worth repeating what I said earlier in one of my posts. I viewed shugden and their followers as evil based purely on what His Holiness said about them. Thankfully, I changed this view a long time ago. And I am happy that I did.

    I think that the shugden group failed in the Public Relation division, big time. They fell right into the trap laid down for them. They should not have committed those heinous crimes. It was not an acceptable behavior. They should have approached and dealt with the unfair treatment in a more strategic manner. Those unacceptable behaviors by the shugden group made them look bad in the eyes of the other group and they involuntarily provided evidence to what the other group was claiming that they are the bad guys.

    What I just described was in the past. It is important to be cognizant of our history. However, I don’t believe in crying over spilled milk. Going forward, we should be optimistic, wear positive attitudes, correct the mistakes that happened in the past, and most importantly, make sure that such mistakes do not reoccur. In this spirit, I would like to suggest that people from both the sides should come forward and work hard to remove the stain that I was talking about earlier. Many people may not realize this at this point, but I fear that if this stain is not removed before the wound becomes too old and too deep for any medication, this has a huge potential to be a cause of immense problems for generations to come. For instance, we could end up with problems similar to what the two muslim groups, Shia and Sunni, suffer from. They simply cannot get along well.

  137. Rigzin | May 1st, 2013 | 1:42 pm

    “He gave his best. There is no question about it. However, in return, he was awarded immense respect by the Tibetan people, enjoyed the comfort of life no one could, and built reputation for himself worldwide with the support and blessings of the Tibetan people. What more can we do? By the way, what we have to understand is that what he did to us was his responsibility as a leader who ruled us for 60 long years. ”

    Awarded immense respect by the Tibetan people, build reputation worldwide, enjoyed comfort no one could. I have very serious issues with these words you have used to counter the argument that we have not repaid his holiness in kind. Honestly we have not. We have failed miserably and the current situation we are in is a measure of that. I am astounded by the fact that you have so nonchalantly used these words that reek of vileness and mischief. This is what irks me of folks who want to see separation of the church and the state tomorrow, and eschew the Middle way path and the grandiosity that they know better. Do they know any better? The answer is a big NO. Even JN is guilty of this. But I don’t hold JN fully responsible. It is those readers of his writings who take his words by heart and want to act on them without understanding the conundrum we are in. JN does not have a blueprint to freedom. No one does. JN is just nudging us so we don’t go to sleep and I respect him for that. Learn to respect the sentiments of fellow Tibetans. If words like build reputation and enjoyed comfort are thrown around like they add meat to your argument, then you better stick to it and be answerable to the Tibetans. Man I don’t know what was your motivation to come up with that argument but it is really sad. Enjoying comfort no one could! Building reputation! Are you serious?

  138. lhamo seldon | May 1st, 2013 | 2:12 pm

    As a Tibetan born and brought up in the Tibetan community, i still can’t digest what people who act so humble and nyamchung infront of H.H and here they are throwing insults at a person who has taken upon the challenge to open our fevicol glued eyes on how a democracy should be run. To tell you the truth i believe that the average Tibetan in exile doesn’t really care about the decisions that the CTA makes, they are just satisfied with a Kundun jelka or a Kundun kalop, which in the end are of no use if you don’t follow them (proof in the previous comments), such hypocrisy in our community. The people who take a shit to care about what decisions the CTA makes are people like JN who choose to think differently. People really need to get out of their bubbles and start thinking for themselves for a change, And start thinking what Democracy really means. It’s because of such hypocrites like some above commentors that thinkers (people who actually take their time to think)like JN choose to stay away. plus heres a really important topic i want to talk about, it’s a so called taboo Shugden followers. SERIOUSLY people what is the harm in devoting to a lha (dugcha or yagpo who knows) who kind of gives the impression of bestowing good luck and wealth, health! Everyone asks for these things from every god irrespective of what that certain god represents. Please think forward, to the extreme then think scientifically (i.e theres no such thing as god, ghosts etc) and you will realise what useless things we let our community fall apart on. Seriously there is no Choe dhe rawang in our exile community if such feelings persist for a certain percentage of people who chose to remain loyal to their beliefs. If you strongly believe they are on a wrong path then let them realize things by themselves instead of alienating, discriminating, demonizing them. I used to only hear about atrocities against shugden followers ( you may have already got the inkling of how i could have heard of these, no i am not a Shugden follower but i am associated with people who are, simply put i am shugden neutral) but i really came to realise the hypocrisy of our supposedly good community when i saw for my self how people (anti shugden) react to shugden followers. I saw an officail ask a monk no more than 12 years of age if he was a lha tenkhen, the naive little monk said yes, then that official asked about who his teacher was and this naive little monk continued to answer his questions, that was an eye opener, first of all, did this little monk or his teacher pose any threat to that particular official or the Tibetan community as a whole, seriously what could a monk less than 12 years old do to harm this already hypocrite society of ours. Because of these things i might as well go on to say that religion is poison if it is not of the right vessel. As much as i respect H.H, after realizing what a huge non ill intended mistake he made in taking this anti Shugden stand, he is the leader of Tibet of all Tibetans, when one has such a deep rooted following and has such responsibility on their shoulders,i would have thought twice about it before branding a few group of people anti Dalai Lama just because they chose to remain loyal to their beliefs. Saying that people should stop praying for a deity just because it has supposedly damaging effects such a greed is not enough of an excuse to cause such discourse in an already fragile community. After reading please do not go on to accuse JN of having shugden followers as supporters, this will only show what a closed minded person you are. I may as well go on to add that i have the greatest respect for H.H, even i a shugden sympathizer get sad when i see anyone say anything bad about H.H, but in the end after realizing his mistake i feel sense of betrayel like how a person who i so looked up to let me down. These are my personal opinion and i am very sorry if i offended anyone. But please try to understand this anger that i have burning within me about all these issues

  139. Sayadruk | May 1st, 2013 | 2:31 pm

    #137 Rigzin

    I could apologize and do so sincerely if that will help you in any way. However, is there any wrong in stating the facts? You said you had serious issues with what I stated, but you did not say why and how. I thought I was simply stating the facts. The questions one could have are, does HH deserve respect from the Tibetan people? Does He deserve the life he is living? My answer would be a resounding, yes and yes. Is there any problem with it? Don’t try to be too emotional and be very eager to question and attack the motivation of other people. This will not be helpful for the community that you are seemingly trying to promote and protect. You should understand that we share this similar goal.

    I was not arguing that we have repaid in full, borrowing your language. Let me ask you the question that I asked Dr. Dorjee. Under what circumstances would you consider having repaid in full? Can you provide a definition to the full repayment? Can you be clear about what more we can do? These will help us really put our concerted efforts to achieve our goal of repaying HH in full. It is my personal desire to do so like so many other people. But I don’t know what more we can do.

    “honestly we have not. We have failed miserably and the current situation we are in is a measure of that.” Would you mind elaborating on this?

  140. Kalsang Phuntsok | May 1st, 2013 | 2:45 pm

    Rigzin la, I think you are over-reacting. I agree those were not the best choice of words but the point Sayadruk is trying to make holds if we don’t chose to distract ourselves over the language.

    Personally, I think deep down His Holiness did not wanted to be in the position he finds himself in. He would rather be a simple monk or a lay person living life in seclusion with his philosophy books and science experiments. He would definitely be an intellectual. But he never had a choice. This responsibility to be the leader of a nation was thrust upon him right from a young age. No one asked him if he wanted it or not. Whether he personally liked it or not he took it as his responsibility to lead the Tibetans through the most darkest of times in our history. He understood the significance of his office and the hope the Tibetan people invested in it. And I admire him for that reason to no end. Any other person with a weaker resolve would have given up and taken refuge in a western country and could be living a comfortable life far from all the troubles. It can legitimately be argued that the Tibetan issue may not have gotten the attention it had if HHDL had chosen not to lead us. And I Thank HH from the bottom of my heart for leading us thus far even though I don’t always agree with all that he does and says. I claim myself to be a rational person. Whether I am or not, I leave that to others to judge. And I want to be honest with HHDL. But I can’t be honest with him if I am not honest with myself first.

  141. daveno | May 1st, 2013 | 3:14 pm

    If you are Tibetan…Raise your HAND!

    Now, who has problem when HHDL speaks about his political views?
    Doesn’t HHDL has the same rights like JN or others throwing out their opinion towards a solution.And if you do not like his views..say NAY! just as some here would say..NA NA to JN’s view but dont go farther than that…stick within the premise of the time…HHDL is no longer the political leader.However, if you still believe that HHDl is the leader (in your own fantasy) that would be your own making.Dont direct your fantasy world to HHDL.

    Every tibetan-be a student,teacher,entrepreneaur ,monks,nuns,rinpoche and workers has a responsibility to voice their opinion and participate to bring about a solution..its ok for a factory worker to voice about political stuff just like monks or lama or nun or intellectual can voice their opinion.

    which democratic country in the world has completly separated religious from politics..i mean completely– not by books or in words..in action too? For just symbolism…who are v kidding?

  142. Choni | May 1st, 2013 | 3:41 pm

    One word shocking .

  143. BHOD_RANGZEN | May 1st, 2013 | 3:45 pm

    I just cant stand those people who are always the bashers/ ostracizers. yesterday they were the ones worshipping Shugden and demonising/ ostracising non worshippers of shugden and today these same people are demonising/ ostracising shugden worshippers who refused to give up. Who knows which way the tide will turn tomorrow
    and then are you again going to demonise somebody else? or who knows it might be your turn and then you will know how it feels. or maybe you’re the type who just doesnt have it in you and and will always find yourself going with the tide no matter what.

  144. Rigzin | May 1st, 2013 | 3:56 pm

    #Sayadruk 139

    I am not asking for an apology and am not overawed with emotions. Least of all am condemning you over your rights to free speech. You say you were merely stating the facts. The facts being His Holiness is enjoying the comforts of life no one could and building his reputation around the globe. I have serious issues with what you have said because it is very insinuating. I can’t tell if the words that you chose to express yourself is a reflection of your thought process. Or it was just a poor choice of words on your part. I don’t know. I take language as a very powerful medium, and it’s not as mundane as some of us might take it to be. So the insinuation deliberate or accidental is my issue. When you say he is building his reputation, it implies a selfish motive, may be you didn’t mean it that way but it comes across that and carries a negative connotation. You also write he is enjoying the comforts of life no one could again again implying he is faring better than an average person. May be I am overreacting but my frustration stems not just from what you have written but it is these kind of toothless arguments and counter arguments that’s exchanged back and forth.

  145. Sayadruk | May 1st, 2013 | 6:36 pm

    #144 Rigzin

    It is difficult to have serious and constructive discussions with people who would willfully ignore the questions asked. None of the questions I asked in my previous post was answered. You did not dispute the facts I presented.

    You simply said you have problems. If you cannot define your problems that you claim to have, they will remain your problems. No one can help you.

    Don’t bring up irrelevant topics like freedom of speech and condemnation. This will muddle our discussion. I am not worried about anyone trampling on my freedom.

    I can assure you that I carefully choose my words in conveying my opinions and/or facts because I understand the importance of the power of words.

    I will not address all of the negative inferences that you drew from the facts I have presented. However, let me address one of them with the hope that you will understand the point in the context that I am conveying. HH has built a reputation for himself. We made it possible. There is a great demand for this brand name HH. This is a fact. And I am proud of this fact. I will not be comfortable sharing my honest opinion on your associating reputation with selfish motives in this public forum for the sake of civility.

    If you see nothing but negativity in people who do not share your viewpoints in entirety, I hope there are some counseling programs to help you with that kind of a problem. For your own sake, get help before it is too late.

  146. Rigzin | May 1st, 2013 | 7:07 pm

    @Sayadruk

    To each his own!

  147. Chong Samdup | May 1st, 2013 | 8:21 pm

    Jamayang Norbu la is such an inspiration to us all. You are our foremost intellectual and one that motivates us to continue the struggle for Rangzen.

    But I must say that you are also a bit funny in your speeches weather you realize it or not. On describing alcoholism among Tibetans in Lhasa…”bab ri dhe pa ray…or he rolled away in the dirt” and all. On prostitution in Tibet…”prostitutes dotted along the bakhor…not even glamorous…crooked make up etc”.

    Great imagination when Tibet is free…the world watching HH live on Times square TV “walking down the steps of his plane arriving Lhasa…a bit older shaky with his walking stick…and people going wild”.

    Wowwww!! Aawwahh!! This is great stuff and most inspiring fueling hope that the day is around the corner for Tibetans. Thank you Jamyangla and keep up those simple straightforward and honest talks even though, once in a while you sound amusingly funny!!!

  148. yanzom | May 1st, 2013 | 9:10 pm

    http://www.tibetsun.com/news/2013/04/26/likely-change-in-tycs-independence-stand

    so creeepy popolas calling themself youth

  149. dawa tsering | May 1st, 2013 | 9:16 pm

    An interesting cross examination by Filmmaker Tashi Wangchuk.

    http://www.tibetsun.com/opinions/2013/04/28/a-true-son-of-tibet

  150. Tenzin | May 1st, 2013 | 10:54 pm

    Daveno are you stupid or is this your normal state of mind? No one is saying that His Holiness can’t have opinions. It is His Holiness himself who tells everyone that he is fully retired from politics. You have short memory or you would know that many individuals like Jamyang Norbu la and many organizations begged His Holiness to stay on as symbolic leader of Tibetan Government but he said no as he said he want to retire completely. To make it clear since I don’t know where your head is it, it is His Holiness who even at Salugara said I am fully retired! To equate the opinion of a factory worker as the same as that of His Holiness is beyond stupid. A factory worker’s opinions will not lead to emergency meetings and change of policies. This has been mentioned by others yet you refuse to acknowledge it. Seriously, don’t be an idiot.

  151. ng | May 2nd, 2013 | 1:15 am

    lol…fight for Tibet online, and finding comfort on online, if this is the case, good job. If it is really thought of fighting for a country, then it is the place place!

    Fight should be on the ground, if you have problem with CTA, march to Kkangkyi. If you have problem with HHDL, march to Tsuklak Khang. If you have problem with Jamyang Norbu, stop inviting the sensational opinionated old man from the hill of Mid-West. If you are thinking for fighting for Tibet, actually you are slaughtering each other which China wants badly. Enjoy China!!!!! If you are fight against China, stop bullshit online of street problem, go and hit the China on the real backbone in China or Tibet. Otherwise, you are bunch of cowards who exercises your shallow intellectuals under the guise of freedom and democracy with a foregone defeatist conclusion of being a looser!

    NG

  152. tenzin Dhonyoe | May 2nd, 2013 | 1:31 am

    A VERY RELEVANT AND TIMELY ANALYSIS BY CHEWANG NGOKHANG

    http://www.tibetanpoliticalreview.org/articles/mwaistheworstproposal

    MIDDLE WAY POLICY IS THE WORST PROPOSAL

    Chewang Ngokhang (Southern California).

    Yes, MWA or the Middle Way Approach is the worst form of proposal on the table except for the rest. Some of you will be able to know where I am coming from. Today, many youth in China are lamenting that Beijing is not doing enough in spreading its influence in the hinterlands as well as in the Pacific sea. Hence, she is flexing her muscles in the South China and East China Seas making several countries in the vicinity feeling jittery. In light of these developments MWA stands out as the best proposal that is beneficial to both the entities. By 2020 China will be closer to having a 2020 vision and subsequently, MWA will have a chance since many of its intellectuals, scholars, students already understand the reasonable and resilient proposal.

    Of course, being Gangchenpa (Tibetan) we all dream of Rangzen which is our birthright, and we do have a strong case seeking it in a conducive ambiance in the international arena, but if Rangzen is only a fleeting mirage in today’s political juggernaut, then the next best thing is Rangkyong or MWA which is mutually beneficial to both entities, and proceed just like Ireland and Scotland under the Union umbrella. I am fully cognizant of the fact that some of our Rangzen advocates are well educated in western universities, but I am not sure how well they are educated in our Tibetan history and our way of life. I was born in Tibet, schooled there under the old system and later the CCP’s way, taking part during the Great Leap Forward of the late ’50s, and finally escaping to the free world and landed at Kalimpong in spring of 1961, where I attended St. Augustine’s school. Being the school Head Prefect as appointed by father Hofstetter, I passed the Senior Cambridge Examinations in 1969.

    Then living in Southern California since October 6, 1971 and studied at University of Redlands, where I had majored in international relations and minored in food service. After graduation my student visa expired and soon my survival necessities took precedence over furthering my academic program. Consequently, I got into the KFC enterprises as silent partner with profit sharing as I accentuated my expertise in the field of food service and management. I shouldered the responsibilities of running the operations of seven KFC stores for a period of eighteen years, till I retired in my late forties on August 20, 1997.

    While I was at U of R I was honored to receive a letter of invitation from President Dawson at the recommendations Dr.William J. Klausner, Chairman of the Commission, and Dr. Raymond H. Whitmus, vice President for students to serve as member of President’s Commission on Human Relations on the campus which I accepted with alacrity. In addition to this, I was also the President of International Club with 100% votes from the international students. I had also worked at the Bureau of H.H. the Dalai Lama, New Delhi under the late Representative Thubten Nyinje Chog from May 1970 till October 4, 1971, in my capacity dealing with applications from our folks for IC, permits, visas, etc. In Southern California I was with the Orange county Tibetan students group mainly in the late ’70s, one of the three Directors in the Tibetan Kyidhuk and the first Tsogtso (President) of the Tibetan Association of Southern California, formally incepted on September 16, 1993.

    The reason I highlight a little about myself is that you will have a better understanding of me, and my perspective on the present conundrum between rangkyong and rangzen (autonomy and independence) at a critical juncture in Tibet’s survival. If we are not careful there is danger of Tibet being plunged into the world of oblivion just like some of the dying indigenous entities of today. Therefore, I make myself a voice for the MWA because it makes a whole lot of sense given the precarious situation we are in today. Who says MWA has failed? It’s an ongoing process that is beneficial to both the Gya-Bhod entities. Certainly, it has failed to bear any fruits so far. The rubber stamp CCP officials
    always recite that the gate for dialogue is wide open, but once we enter the open gate we face the impenetrable Great Wall of China. This Great Wall has also become our own Wailing Wall for justice.

    May I side track a little here and touch on the 2008 delegation to Beijing. It is my understanding that during the session our delegates were subjected to harsh words and scolding from the other side. This isn’t anything new, but I had observed something odd looking at the picture of our delegates from both sides in a very formal setting with suits and ties. What made me feel a little embarrassed was that one of our delegates was wearing white socks which was starkly visible to a naked eye. White socks with formal suits and ties is absolutely no no in a formal diplomatic setting. It’s against etiquette of decorum. No wonder they call us barbarians. So, please beware.

    Do you realize that all of us in diaspora could be seated in the mega football stadiums in Mexico City, Sao Paulo or Rio de Janeiro? That’s all we have, and yet we have a multitude of NGOs under all sorts of sensational names, and some even beating the rangzen drum furiously as if Kundun hasn’t done enough or making a huge mistake for settling for less. This is preposterous, and it irks me. Now, the newly formed TNC is glorifying the deeds of the 13th Dalai Lama and his proclamation of Tibet’s Independence. Surely, the 13th Kundun did proclaim Tibet’s independence in 1913 but in no way did he ever say that he had endeavored for it and got independence. I am also happy to learn of late on Phayul an interview of Lhadon Tethong and TYC’s President Mr. Tsewang Rigzin. Mr. Rigzin has tempered his rhetoric a lot by stating if we sought rangzen, then we might have a better chance of acquiring rangkyong. This statement exudes his gumption and I accept it with delight.

    Much ballyhoo comes from Tibet’s apologists who still dream of Tibet’s glorious days. And, I don’t blame them for it cause I, too, dream of the glorious days when we were relatively happy breathing in the fresh air and drinking pure water under the majestic snow clad mountains, while the wildlife freely roamed about in search of greater pasture in perfect harmony with nature. Those days were long gone in line with the karmic cycle of life’s vicissitudes with trials and tribulations. In their efforts to blindly glorify Tibet and the 13th Dalai Lama’s feat in procuring independence, I see them as an entity drifting in the orbit of nincompoop. In his autobiography Gyalwa Thubten Gyatso, the 13th Dalai Lama has succinctly made it clear that Tibet’s proclamation of Rangzen was nothing but as a result of “Tag chu chepe zing bhu”. He used the metaphor which in translation should read as “Stoppage of ever flowing water pond.”

    The metaphor Tag chu chepe zing bhu could mean the dethroning of the Manchu emperor by the Han Chinese under the leadership of Dr. Sun Yat Sun during the Xinhai Revolution in 1911. And, the Chinese rightly claim that was a gift from the Chinese people to Tibet. To that I say darn right! Today, tag chu chepe zing bhu is nowhere in sight. But, I surely see a tag chu barwe xing chen; ever overflowing water’s huge pond. This scenario is visible across the globe whether we like it not; it’s a fact. Therefore, it is delusional to clamor for rangzen at a time when powerful China is soon to surpass the United States in GDP. In addition to being US’s biggest creditor, China and the United States are inextricably intertwined in economic venture, a vision so sagaciously cultivated by Richard Nixon and Dr. Kissinger in their efforts to thwart Soviet expansionism and bring peace in the world. So profound, so brilliant and so farsighted.

    Today I see some of our youths beating the rangzen drum aimlessly without much knowledge of our history, let alone the world history. I came across a mature rangzen advocate who truthfully admitted to me that he didn’t know anything about the name Shigatse when I had mentioned the name. If he didn’t know anything about Shigatse then it’s reasonable to assume he didn’t know anything about Drophagkhamsum or Repangsasum in relationship to our history during the reign of the 13th and 14th Dalai Lamas respectively. The point I am trying to make here is that our youth need to educate themselves on Tibet, its history and with a degree of understanding of our neighboring countries’ history, if not world history; and put our struggle in a correct perspective in realizing a free Tibet.

    Today’s clamour for rangzen will only fall on deaf ears across the globe, and more so among Chinese scholars, intellectuals and students who understand our situation and understand our plea for justice from a government which chairs the efficacious seat in the United Nations Security Council, a beacon of the Universal Declaration of Fundamental Human Rights. What makes you think you can procure a Lamborghini or a Maserati or a Ferrari when you can’t even obtain a Cadillac. I am encouraged that you folks have a passion for Tibet and doing something about our collective endeavor in realizing a free Tibet. Once you are armed with knowledge then steady the boat and sail on an even keel in the labyrinth of political juggernaut. And, always heed a cautionary quote from William Shakespeare, “Violent delights have violent ends; In their triumph die like fire and powder.”

    I have also come across articles from some apologists for Tibet who claim that the 13th Dalai Lama and his administration had thrown the Chinese out of Tibet in 1912 and proclaimed Tibet’s Independence in 1913. It’s true there were some minor skirmishes between the Tibetans and Chinese, but by and large the Chinese were given stipend, ration and transportation to go back to China or India. It was also mentioned about the Lingthur incident in Sikkimese territory under British jurisdiction in the 19th century, when Tibetans had ransacked the British outpost there, as if we Tibetans had done something very resplendent. That wasn’t the case those days when our army was only in name with some levies and conscripts with muskets, swords and spears. That was it. Why distort information like the other propagandists.

    According to a Rangzen advocate, a British army officer in Darjeeling had written that the Tibetans had come within some 65 miles to Darjeeling in the 19th century, after sacking a British outpost at Lingthur in Sikkimese territory, and the locals in Darjeeling were panic stricken. I believe that was purely malarkey. He knew how could our ragtag army ever challenge the might of Great Britain at a time when its power was at the zenith, and the sun never set on the British empire on ever revolving earth. I believe he was connivingly trying to justify his severe retaliatory action, when the Tibetans were so soundly beaten that our levies found themselves fleeing helter-skelter, and found themselves in Hah and Padro valley in Bhutan.

    His prior justification was understandable when the Londoners poured out in force in the streets protesting for butchering innocent Tibetans in the massacre at Chumi Shingo in March 1904. I am quite familiar with these episodes because my birthplace (Phari) is in the vicinity. Also, to embellish my point of view, my grandfather was one of the four Drongrak Magmies (soldiers) stationed at Phari and Dromo in the 1930s and 40s. From him I had learned a lot about the Younghusband intrusion to Tibet although he must have been only a young boy at the time.

    Napoleon Bonaparte had said that a good spy is worth 10,000 soldiers in the battle field. The English claimed there was no need of spies during their incursion to Tibet when our people put up stiff resistance against the onslaught of the foreign marchers to Lhasa. The British knew precisely when they would be attacked and when there wouldn’t be any attacks so that they could relax in the sun, wash clothings, and search for rare species of butterflies, study the topography and what not. Their predictions came from our lunar calendars. Auspicious days meant attacks and inauspicious (chutsak) days meant no attacks at all. Incidentally, their Captain O’Connors was proficient in Tibetan both spoken and written. Well, that was then and this now.

    Today, I see many young Gangchenpas fairly well educated and very patriotic toward our mayul (motherland), which is invigorating but at the same time I caution them not to act rashly because little knowledge is a dangerous thing. Surely, there may be a few neoconservatives in the west loathing the communist government, and giving us some support but I say to you all to trust the Dalai Lama and the MWA. We had some covert support from the west during the late ’50s till the early ’70s without the knowledge of Kundun since it was engineered by a few rangzen advocates in Kailimpong and Darjeeling. Then it was all over just like that in tune with saying easy come easy go. Bela bhim bela boom! We were used.

    The remnants of that legacy is today’s impoverished Tibetans in a state of bhardo or purgatory — in a Himalayan kingdom, languishing in limbo — a classic example of miscarriage of justice. So, I say to the young ones to work hard. Also, keep in mind working hard is not enough for it must be aligned with working smart. And, being smart is also not enough but one must also work with wisdom with a high degree of emotional quotient, inherited from empirical knowledge. In the Dalai Lama I trust. In short, may I borrow a quote from our Secretary of State John Kerry that is relevant to a handful of Rangzen agitators but not all, “Freedom also includes the right to be stupid.”

  153. Tsering dorjee | May 2nd, 2013 | 3:28 am

    I have read that article by CHEWANG NGOKHANG and I am confused as to what he is actually saying without saying anything at all – of his meandering logic peters out on himself on numerous occasions. Is he running for something in the future because sometimes he seem to be answering his own questions and other times doing a poor job of mocking those who believe in something. And it is never sexy when somebody blows their own trumpet and use that as a badge of authority on a given topic. I usually find such people pretencious and dim-witted most of the time.

    His whole article filled with irrelevant anecdotes could be summed up in one sentence: “In the Dalai lama I trust.”. If tomorrow, the Dalai Lama changes his stance to that of Independence, he will be the first one in line. he is right, freedom does indeed include the right to be stupid – and too long.

    Does he actually believe Kundun didn’t know anything about the Mustang Affairs? Is he that gullible or simply being blind in his faith? It is ridiculous.

  154. tall | May 2nd, 2013 | 7:25 am

    @sayadruk…hows your PHD in statistic thingi going?

    Kay JUJU!! I expected better result from your scientific approach in training your disciples.
    Look at how “Statistician” have improved in trying to manipulate the basic foundation of tibetanness through his subtle logic…just the way you do! But he still needs improvements thigns are very obvious from his first step.

  155. daveno | May 2nd, 2013 | 7:46 am

    @150 chocho Tenzin, I must be the true idiot to go through in detail of each post here.You are the smarter one picking up the once that are RIPED to your own taste.

    Chocho, Everyone has right to express their opinion–a factory worker or intellectual,nuns ,monks ,smart individual like yourself and HHDL.Now “equating” opinion stuff came out of your SMART BRAIN. Have to tried to equate opinion or trying to make a point that everyone has rights.

    If opinions of HHDL is drawing emergency meetings..what do i have to do with it.Talk to the guys that are having these meeting…its their democractic rights to meet or not meet.

  156. Sayadruk | May 2nd, 2013 | 9:12 am

    # Tenzin Dhonyoe

    Just providing a link to the article and/or posting the whole article that you like and that you think helps you make your points may not fulfill your purpose of doing so. Such an approach may not be a right one. In a discussion forum, provide your comments but not someone else, especially the whole article.

    When you copy and paste the whole article and simply say that this is a timely article, people get an impression that you don’t know what you are talking about. Therefore, try to summarize the whole article in a paragraph or two in your own words. Or, just discuss only those points, preferably in your own words, in the article and present a case as to how it supports your points and/or why you think it is a timely article.

  157. Sayadruk | May 2nd, 2013 | 9:15 am

    #146 Rigzin

    You are not entitled to your own facts.

  158. BHOD_RANGZEN | May 2nd, 2013 | 9:34 am

    Chewang Ngokhang writes,

    “…but i had observed something odd looking at the picture of our delegates from bothsides in a very formal setting with suits and ties. what made me feel a little embarrassed was theat one of our delegats was wearing white socks which was starkly visible to a naked eye. White socks with formal suits and ties is absolutely no no in a formal diplomatic setting. It’s agaisnt etiquette of decorum. No wonder they call us barbarians. So, please beware”

    Wow! Just this paragrah speaks volumes and enough for me to get a good understanding of Mr Chewang Ngokhang and his perspective of things. I think he lived in the west for too long. He needs a break a see how people live around the world and not be obsessed by man made contructs of so called decorum. There’s definietly nothing to be proud of how the the 2 delegates handled the negotaitons overall but to just focus on a non-issue like white socks is so shallow. YOu know its a well known fact that there are many “barbarians” wearing perfect suit and tie with so called perfect socks. They are called CEO’s.

  159. The Owl | May 2nd, 2013 | 10:02 am

    Oh there you are Tenzin Dhonyoe. Thanks for not bothering to answer my query, perhaps just as well, save you the embarrassment.

    Yeah you’re not kidding Tsering Dorjee, boy how this drunk Chewang meander, rambling on and on like there is no tomorrow. I actually started to doze off, when I came to, I saw the word KFC which made me hungry. I thought it was lunch time, but it wasn’t

    Slogging through this long winded article reminded me of being on a long, boring car ride where the mind keeps nagging, are we there yet? are we there yet? are we there yet? And once you finally get there, you wished you never left home in the first place. What a waste of time.

    Whos up next Tenzin Dhonyoe? The middleway author from Taco Bell?

  160. Rigzin | May 2nd, 2013 | 11:27 am

    @Sayadruk

    There you go again. You wrote, “There is a great demand for this brand name HH.” Do you write extemporaneously? Is writing a spur of the moment thing for you? I get the gist of your opinions, but if you are the face of the new generation of Tibetans, educated, highly opinionated and more importantly free which by the way is a conjecture on my part, then I would not be comfortable with giving you the reign. Brand name HH. Do you know what brand name is? Have you ever heard of the word commodity? You were so quick to pounce on my mental health and suggested a counselor, but let me be more civil than that, and suggest you to read more books so you learn correct usage of English words.

  161. daveno | May 2nd, 2013 | 12:00 pm

    Thank you Tenzin Dhonyoe la for posting that article here..

    I visited KFC for lunch and had to replace my regular ketchup i prefer with the below.

    ”Today’s clamour for rangzen will only fall on deaf ears across the globe, and more so among Chinese scholars, intellectuals and students who understand our situation and understand our plea for justice from a government which chairs the efficacious seat in the United Nations Security Council, a beacon of the Universal Declaration of Fundamental Human Rights. What makes you think you can procure a Lamborghini or a Maserati or a Ferrari when you can’t even obtain a Cadillac. I am encouraged that you folks have a passion for Tibet and doing something about our collective endeavor in realizing a free Tibet. Once you are armed with knowledge then steady the boat and sail on an even keel in the labyrinth of political juggernaut. And, always heed a cautionary quote from William Shakespeare, “Violent delights have violent ends; In their triumph die like fire and powder.”

  162. BHOD_RANGZEN | May 2nd, 2013 | 2:55 pm

    @161
    “Todays clamour for Rangzen…….”

    Even a 10 year old knows to ask for a horse when he/she will settle for dog.

    “Violent delights have violent ends…..”

    I never heard of any Rangzen activists propgating violence. why is this guy giving credence to china’s propaganda.

  163. An Observer | May 2nd, 2013 | 7:09 pm

    # 152

    I can see a couple of wonderful lengthy books coming from Ajo Che la:

    1.”Lessons in Realpolitik from the US fast food industry”.

    2.“Everyday plagiarizing and recycling of witticisms for self-effacing high achievers”.

  164. Rangzenwalla | May 2nd, 2013 | 8:45 pm

    I like this Letters to the Editor‎ by Tsering Topgyal lak its my very feelings too!


    Salugara Speech by His Holiness and Retirement
    posted Apr 21, 2013, 10:06 AM by The Tibetan Political Review

    By Tsering Topgyal (Montreal, Canada) April 5, 2013.

    I am a Tibetan who believes that loyalty towards Kundun does not carry the burden of agreeing to policies that one disagrees,despite my immense respect I would like to point out that the retirement plan appears to be on hold.

    How is it possible in light of his recent speech in Salugara defending the ‘Middle Way Policy’ which carried the weight of his utter insistence that this was the only choice for Tibet that we should accept that he has retired.

    I understand that His Holiness has every right as a Tibetan to voice his opinion but surely he realizes that no Tibetan with any role to play in the political fields of Dhasa would stray away from his words,or any Tibetan unwilling to be ostracized by it’s community could publicly go against the wishes of our beloved Kundun,so what should we make of this retirement? and retirement from what?

    I would have liked to believe that this gift of retirement carried with it the fruit of Tibetans having a healthy debate on the most important issue of its history,the decision to accept rule of Tibet by China which is clearly defined in the ‘Middle Way Policy ‘ or for Tibetans to fight for it’s independence.

    Although many may view my words to be disloyal, I sleep soundly with the simple truth that I have great respect for His Holiness and great love for our people and land.

  165. tsering dorjee | May 2nd, 2013 | 11:11 pm

    “And, always heed a cautionary quote from William Shakespeare, “Violent delights have violent ends; In their triumph die like fire and powder.”

    The above quote from his endless rhetorics was rather problematic and actually misrepresentive of the Rangzen position and I feel he did that on purpose. What a helpful bastard!

    And what is the hell is “Bela bhim bela boom!”? You are a Phd student and such language is quite disingenous coming from a so called scholar. It makes it seem like somebody is tryng too hard to be hip, like an uncle wearing low-hanging pants. If that is the level of intelligence displayed in a Phd these days, I fear for our country. He might become the next Sikyong!!!!

  166. Aye Emma DicHead Anda Nowit | May 3rd, 2013 | 1:37 am

    What is reality is irrelevant. What is historical is irrelevant. You young ones may be educated in the western way. But I know our history best because I was born to pure Dakini and my father not so pure but a great rich dude from the great plains of Tibet. I was sent to St. Whatnot in Kalimpong long before the Himalayas rose from the Tethys. I was born even before the monkey and the ogress so I know better. When my parents ruled the kingdom of Capitulation (AKA Middle Way) I automatically became the counsel because I was found to be wise beyond my age. I got a BA and MA and PhD and some more. Oh Yea I decided not to major in the subject of Modesty. Then America needed me to work as night watchman at the Walmart. I rose up. Up Up until I became a Loud Partner for the local franchise. My point. Oh yea. Middle Way is best because because because.

  167. Aye Emma DicHead Anda Nowit | May 3rd, 2013 | 1:42 am

    “Violent delights have violent ends; In their triumph die like fire and powder.” Who is being violent.
    Litte knowledge sure is a dangerous thing. Don’t quote Willie when you don’t know your ass from the hole in the ground.

  168. ng | May 3rd, 2013 | 2:23 am

    @owl: from your mother’s pussy start middle way…lol

    ng

  169. karma | May 3rd, 2013 | 3:46 am

    Two things to be pondered upon in this plain text that lacked proper back up source or previous findings. First thing first, the devolution of HHDL’s power which came down from history, moral authority and natural law, was not easy to understand because it is a unique. Especially the spiritual/religious authority is still more complicated as there are well known and not so well known traditions and customs. Hence no lay person can never ever become Dalai Lama. So the apprehension that LS will become next Dalai Lama like figure is baseless. Secondly the whole quotation that JN cites from a translated salugara statement was again not true becaouse HHDL never said that. Please read the Tibetan version carefully. It was poor translation work.

  170. karma | May 3rd, 2013 | 5:09 am

    what is TD doing here. He messes up whole thing by bringing irrelevant clippings from somewhere. Does he really know what he is trying to say in this most boring texts. MWA is worst proposal titles his text and thrashes rangzen moments but finally ends with most stupid American quotes of this century and declares his faith in HHDL.

  171. ringzin | May 3rd, 2013 | 6:28 am

    JN la,
    till now i always consider you are Rangzen activist and master piece writer in our exile community. If you are shukden supporter as mention in the http://www.tibettimes.net/news.php?id=7633 .and again the H.H Dalai lama on religious point. I Hate you lo.

  172. Kalsang Phuntsok | May 3rd, 2013 | 10:16 am

    Rigzin la, these are obviously baseless allegations. The writer of the article, the link to which you have pasted on your comment, doesn’t even have the courage to publish his or her name. He / she uses the name, Drong Karpo, which is not a real name. This type of article is written to fool those who are not very well informed and solely intended to incite hatred against Jamyang la. Fortunately, there also people who are paying attention. If you read the comment section of the article, there are people who know how to differentiate between a what is true and what is just BS.

    If you now hate Jamyang la because of some third rate article written by a gutless coward, then that raises questions on your credibility.

  173. Aye Emma DicHead Anda Nowit | May 3rd, 2013 | 10:50 am

    Some people need to pull their heads out of other people’s asses and start reading, and thinking for themselves.

  174. Pema T. | May 3rd, 2013 | 1:57 pm

    100@Tsering Dolker,

    Your above comments doesn’t make any sense and childish alike. To be truthful, Lobsang Sangay lak is a new comer in the Tibetan political scene and needs some guidance especially from H.H. The Dalai Lama. As a Tibetan, Sikyong make sure to be with H.H. the Dalai Lama on many trips abroad, so that he will get to know the world leaders through H.H. The Dalai Lama. Aside from H.H. The Dalai Lama, who is there to introduce him to leaders around the world. Your favourite Jamyang Lak will only look at the White house with some awe and that’s it.

    And as a former political and religious head of Tibet, H.H. The Dalai Lama has responsibility to take some Sikyong’s burden on his shoulder, and Lobsang Lak has every right to consult H.H. The Dalai Lama on matters which are important. That’s is called cooperation and not what you and your favourite Jamyang Lak thinks “Pretend”

  175. Tenam | May 3rd, 2013 | 2:22 pm

    @174

    Please dont tell me that Tibetan Sikyong post is Harvard University’s job placement for Lobsang Sangay? is that so?

  176. Pema T. | May 3rd, 2013 | 2:34 pm

    169@Karma,

    The below extract from Jamyang Lak above article are authentic and I myself listened to it on certain facebook links. But the main point is Jamyang Lak as an aggressor wants Rangzen (complete independence), which I think, he as a Tibetan has right to do so. But he has so far put no clear strategy to overcome the mighty China. On the other hand, H.H. The Dalai Lama, a loving compassionate, true follower of Buddha put his faith in Middle Way and wants to stay under China, having our own freedom to exercise our rights.

    “On 29 March 2013 at a teaching at Salugara in North India, His Holiness expounded in great detail on the incomparable merits of the Middle Way Approach and how its implementation would bring about peace and economic prosperity inside Tibet. He added that advocacy of independence, though, was “closing the door” for establishing contact with China, thereby subverting His efforts at negotiation. His Holiness stated that the Middle Way Approach would furthermore bring benefits to “400 -500 million Chinese Buddhists” and even spread the Buddha Dharma, particularly Tibetan Buddhism throughout China as had happened in the past. He made no direct reference to the self-immolations and only hinted at the failure of Dharamshala’s dialogue efforts with Beijing, but he insisted that he had “full confidence that it (the Middle Way Approach) will produce results in the future.” At the conclusion of his talk he stated emphatically that “Most importantly, the Tibetans in Tibet continue to put their trust in me and to place their faith in me. Similarly, the Tibetans in exile put their trust in me and place their faith in me. So I retain a responsibility.“**

  177. Urhead IsIn Uranus | May 3rd, 2013 | 10:44 pm

    @176

    JN the aggressor? Where did you get that profound knowledge? Your head is stuck way up in there. Please pull it out, dust your brain, shake shake it and just try to use it.

    Tibetans in Tibet put faith in His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Its like you love your parents. But do you want your parents to make decisions about every aspect of your life? For example just because you love your parents would it be okay if your parents tell you to give up your house to the powerful dude next door because the dude needs two houses to fill his dozen children? Come on man.

  178. Tsering Dolker | May 3rd, 2013 | 11:03 pm

    Pema T: if you think my statement is childish, then you need to take the blue pill and wake up. Lobsang Sangay said he could lead the Tibetan people and while he can use some guidance from Kundun, the way he was following Kundun around is over the top. How about trying to stand on your own two feet and not giving the impression HH is still in power? It certainly does look like that. And it could be very well be true too. So in effect, nothing has changed. War does Jamyangnorbu has to do with it? I value his insight but that is about it. Nothing mysterious about it.

    Why does HH have responsibility to take Sikyong’s responsibility on his shoulders? He has done it for 60 years!!’ Sikyong has his cabinet to consult, otherwise what is the whole point of having them there?

  179. karma | May 4th, 2013 | 12:30 am

    I mean the word “RETAIN” is misnomer.

  180. karma | May 4th, 2013 | 1:26 am

    PEMA T.: Since you were there yourself. Why are you again bring that translation which is porly done. Eg. The word “RETAIN” should have been translated simply as “HAVE”. If this had been done, JN wouldn’t have so outraged and perhaps never written this big politically titled article. That means in future whosoever translate Tibetans into English especially HHDL’s talk who normally uses specific words for a specific occasion, needs special care. Lest such misunderstanding can reoccur and distort whole things up.

  181. karma | May 4th, 2013 | 1:51 am

    sorry for those missing syllables “Bringing” “poorly”

  182. Pema T. | May 4th, 2013 | 2:04 am

    177@Tsering Dolker,

    If you are really sincere in your approach towards the Tibetan freedom struggle, then stop worrying about my life. I can manage whatever comes through. Your big mouth could be of more use if you highlight the Tibetan people’s long awaited wishes rather than mud slinging and brain washing others in this forum by supporting Jamyang lak all the time.

    Anywhere if you were to become a elected Sikyong, then you would be consulting H.H. time and again on matters which are sensitive and need people’s approval, since the colleagues under you would be indecisive and lacking the real insight on the issues which are important. Just because Lobsang Lak has cabinets under him doesn’t mean that they will deliver all the time. And why are so jealous of LS, and what is the whole point of making LS as “puppy” of H.H The Dalai Lama.

  183. looper | May 4th, 2013 | 2:11 am

    cutting down from the bud of the flower will result to see nothing, its been long time for us but where’s the flower? we are nothing compare to United state but they also have loopholes, so Jamyang la… Instead of pointing mistakes why don’t try to suggest and make a better administration!

  184. ng | May 4th, 2013 | 2:18 am

    JN cannot understand HHDL’s speech? He must be fucked up in Tibetan, his mother’s language…fucking pathetic soul…….do we need translator….let me know, if you need translator next time…I will make sure to prove how shallow you are!

    @OWL, did you put Buddhas statue into your mothers pussy…it has been a long time to see the result of our hypnosis with Buddhisim….

    @Tsering Dolkar….did you such Tenthong’s dick he was he deteated in the election. I like follow ups!

    @ JN, did you provide process of RFA controversy you created resolved and end result? Or you just stated because you fucking cousin got the job and you are just being happy….

    NG

  185. Tsering Dolker | May 4th, 2013 | 3:35 am

    Pema T. I am not really concerned about your pathetic life and I am more than involved with Tibetan struggle, thank u very much, mister. Yes, one or two things which are of extreme importance, but this constant following him around like a good little dog is in poor taste and moreover not progressive nor leadership material. He seems to be even asking about the choice of Chupa and the color of wall paper. Show that you are a leader on your own, anybody can lean in Kundun. Even I can do it. You can do it too.

    NewGen: nobody wants ur pencil dick opinion. Keep paying for sex. Kyiiiiii hehe

  186. karma | May 4th, 2013 | 5:08 am

    I am surprised why are some people hissing so negatively. Please do restraint yourself and strictly control on your abusive languages.

  187. Pema T. | May 4th, 2013 | 5:08 am

    183@Tsering Dolker,

    Yeah, I may be living a pathetic life as you said but, I have my peace of mind intact everyday and don’t need to interfere with other people’s personal lives just like you do. The choice of Chupa and the color of wall paper is non of your business. And remember, the great leaders are born not out of the blue but through constant learning, hardwork, experience & dedication.

    You are one over confident, boisterous and dejected women.

  188. karma | May 4th, 2013 | 5:14 am

    Lets be inclusive. This should be happily apply to JN for becoming devils advocate more often than not.

  189. Pema T. | May 4th, 2013 | 5:16 am

    179@Karma,

    Who told you I am there during H.H. The Dalai Lama’s speech. Buddy, read through the whole comments and then key in your thoughts.

  190. Tsering Dolker | May 4th, 2013 | 6:39 am

    Great leaders might have been through all that, hard work, experience, dedication, but he displayed none of it and yet you elected him. Apparently, those are not necessary to be Sikyong because all you do is follow Kindun around and ask his opinion. If something goes wrong, point to Kundun. Take no responsibility at all. We have done this for the longest time. How much longer are we going to keep doing this?

    I am a 21st century woman and I don’t need ur approval to be confident. You might on the other hand learn to read properly. Ta ta

  191. daveno | May 4th, 2013 | 8:55 am

    hai hai..i haven’t so far come accross Sikyong pointing finger to HHDL. There is one thing i am pretty sure LS will do, own up to his failure if any. IF not, i will make sure–he pays for displaying such stupidity.

  192. daveno | May 4th, 2013 | 9:12 am

    when you dont consult a specialist and make decision of your own without the depth of knowledge required..you will be considered a ARROGANT LOOSER.

  193. Pema T. | May 4th, 2013 | 10:09 am

    190@Tsering Dolker,

    If you are a 21st century women, then why are you still hiding in your comfort zone? On the other hand, LS have the guts to come out in the open and make some difference and that’s why people elected him. If you have the will power and the guts to take some burden, then you too can do the same thing. But unfortunately, you don’t have all these qualities and that’s why you are making petty issues out of clothes and the color of the wall paper. Shame to you for being a useless modern women.

  194. Dawa | May 4th, 2013 | 11:20 am

    On 3rd May 2013, Central Office of the Tibetan People’s Movement for “Middle Way” is organizing a speech on “Middle Way” by Chithue Thupten Lungrik to all the students and staffs of Gopalpur at TCV School Gopalpur.

    Conditioning the future generation to follow the status quo and not think about alternatives.

    It’s beginning to sound more and more like Communist C hina where you hear only one side. The Party’s side.

  195. Pema T. | May 4th, 2013 | 12:23 pm

    It’s good to see the Office of the TPR, is taking the lead to educate the masses on the middle way policy, which has the support of the majority of the Tibetans. And I feel, that what matters in the end. Of course, there are some individuals who want to start Rangzen agendas in the Tibetan diaspora and that’s is also another alternative but has no majority support.

  196. Dawa | May 4th, 2013 | 1:46 pm

    Majority and minority should be accorded their inherent rights to be heard. Otherwise since you people want to become minority Chinese you will be in a pickle some day when the majority of the Chinese population decide that you have to speak mandarin and wear mao suits. It’s possible it will be congenial to your nature.

  197. Tenzin choephel | May 4th, 2013 | 2:18 pm

    To,
    JN, i m glad to see that you are good in literature, but i am saddened by the continues criticism on H.H The Dalai Lama and Syikong Lobsang Sangay. i want you to come in India and lead the Rangzen campaign in order to restore the Independence. i m confused why you are hiding in USA and running after money. if you want reputations like HH then you have to earn it. so i request you to think well and do the works which will benefits us not to chinese authories. so if you think you are a man then come to India and lead the People. die like a man and live like a man. also you have defamed most of the tibetans who believe in middle way approach. it is a sad and i think you dont have right to defame us untill and unless you come on the stage and lead us to freedom.

    TO Owl,

    first of all you are a such coward and i m feeling pity on u. you dont have a courage to reveal your identity and your name, so first of all you learn how to be honest and brave and then post things you wish to say.

    To
    Tsering dorjee.
    you dont have a sense of humor and you dont have a sense of shame. u think well and dont run after the wolfs. you better be with your own kind rather than being someone else.
    at last JN and Owl, Tsering dorjee pls respect H H Dalai lama and try to solve the conflict with negotiation and be like a man and dont be like chinese

  198. Pema T. | May 4th, 2013 | 3:18 pm

    196@Dawa,

    Looks like you’ve difficulty understanding the middle way policy. Anywhere, where I have written that minority doesn’t have the right to air their opinion. I just mentioned that having Rangzen as our policy is another alternative but to implement it we need people’s approval. We need to gather more support to make it as core policy of our freedom struggle. Of course I also need complete independence but that’s not enough to make it work. Barking and yelling at each other is of no use if we really failed to educate the masses who in the end decide what is good and bad.

  199. TENAM | May 4th, 2013 | 3:40 pm

    @195

    Without the rangzen agenda, middle way is a dead end. according to ccp its already their middle way right now, so what you waiting for? why you not go back in the bosom of chewang Ngokhang’s so- called “Mayul” motherland china and partake in the economic boom of continous exploitation of our Phayul Tibet? Chewang Ngokhang’s education under the communist in his formative years sealed his outlook forever it seems.maybe he can set up a KFC in mayul and wear red socks.

  200. Pema T. | May 4th, 2013 | 4:23 pm

    199@Tenam,

    If I have the middle way and manage to return back to homeland, then even you would be wearing that red socks cause individuals like you and me don’t have the right to change the policy overnight. We can only discuss and exchange ideas. We need collective hands to fight for a cause and implement it. Maybe you are thinking of creating an organization having Rangzen agendas written all over it but it would be futile without the people’s approval. Only then CTA will move towards Rangzen.

  201. Tsering Dolker | May 4th, 2013 | 5:28 pm

    Pema t: that is such a stupid comment. What makes you think I am not doing my bit for Tibet? And furthermore this is not about who is doing what but HOW they are doing it. It is not like somebody forced him to be Sikyong but he actuvely went for it. Politicians are accountable to the public and we need less and less people like you who push away all criticism as anathema to the state and your next Madhe Turku. Hehe. It is ok if you have a crush on him but don’t let it get in the way of our nation.

    Hey I will do all that. First let me get Phd from Harvard and then I will wait to attain the age of eligibility and run for office of Sikyong. Shame on you for being a male chauvinist pig.

  202. TENAM | May 4th, 2013 | 10:13 pm

    Pema T,
    There are many people who feel strongly about Rangzen. It is their right to have that aspiration. No CTA or any individual can take away that right.

  203. TENZIN CHOEPHEL | May 5th, 2013 | 2:11 am

    To
    @199 Tenam,
    if i am not wrong,there is big difference between what we seek from the chinese through middle way approach and what chinese stand on middle way approach. to be honest, you must learn more about tibetan freedom struggle and its goals.for example read the books written by Tsering shakya. and you will realise the differences between the things i told before.

  204. Swiss Bhoeme | May 5th, 2013 | 6:09 am

    ADVICE OR WARNING

    TO JAMYANG NORBU AND HIS CO PARTERS…… For me I dont see anyhope even if we get rangzen. Because there are people like jamyang norbu, kama chophel who are always trying destabilised the tibean community and making Tibetan issue a difficult issue… If you guys hve really sincere on struggle then shouting empty words in free world is nothing practical rather you hve to do directly against the chinese… This is my surity that you will not going to achieve the aim of spiliting the Tibetan unity before that you will die unsuccessfully because you guys are doing this for your own interest.Dont think that Tibetans are sleeping while nothing is effectively aginst you. Im soon going to organise an NGO which aim to eliminate the persons who are doing anything aganist Tibetan people`s aspiration.Its the best options for you guys to come into Tibetan mainstream, repect and go according to the Tibetan leadership.Its is good for you and for all of us if we are all together under one leader with one common objective ie middle way. IT IS BETTER and IT WOULD SAVE YOUR LIFE TOO. If you guys are stick to this wrong doing, just wait and see what might happen after ward…… so far 117 people in Tibet self immolated themselves for the cause of Tibetan struggle, but i ll sacrifice my life for good cause by setting an exampilary message within our community for making society more stable in unity.I will clear off this political propaganda bY JN SOON. I ll not let this issue to remain unresolved, i ll make it is solve within this life of you and me. Iam going to do an act which will make other people in future to think millions times before they indulge in your kind of present act. UNITY IS STRENGTH N POWER, IF NOT THERE IS NO ACHIEVEMENT. UNITLL TIBETANS ARE FULLY UNITED THERE IS NO USE OF BEING RANGZEN. THINK MILLION JAMYANG NORBU, KARMA CHOEPHEL, LHASANG TSERING AND ETC AND ETCS……………..

  205. Pema T. | May 5th, 2013 | 6:10 am

    202@Tenam,

    It seems you have not understood my point of view. As I mentioned earlier, individuals like Jamyang lak and the organization their represent have the right to express their opinion. But it doesn’t convey a message to the people inside Tibet and the global world that we fully stand for Rangzen. We may have different thoughts and aspiration on our freedom struggle but at the present, middle way is the only policy which is in effect and the people at large supported it. So whatever comes in the near future either Rangzen or Middle way, we need to fight as one. Only then we see the light.

  206. Pema T. | May 5th, 2013 | 6:23 am

    201@Tsering Dolker,

    But when you start to talk about what kind of clothes he wear and the color of the wall paper he prefers, then it is not part of constructive criticism. Rather you are interfering in someone’s personal live. That is Childish & immature.

    Apart from this, kudos to you if you manage to walk the talk.

  207. sonamtso | May 5th, 2013 | 11:53 am

    @200 Pema T,
    If individuals like you and I dont have any say in changing policies then who has?

    @203 Tenzin choephel,
    Middle way approach cant stand on its own without the Rangzen context. one person’s Middle way is another’s splittist way. so be thankful that there is a Rangzen agenda. If there wasn’t a passionate sister movement of Subhash Chandra Bose and others during the Indian Freedom struggle would Gandhiji’s movement have such an impact?

    Swiss Bhoeme:
    I have heard many stories about Bhoeme tsokpa’s high handed behavior in our society in the past but i still like to believe that better sense from increasing awareness will prevail eventually- so better you not use a tsokpa’s name freely like that.you maybe one of his relative’s in Swiss so dont get too carried away.AND DONT YOU DARE ISSUE ONE OF THOSE STUPID WARNINGS,EVER AGAIN!

    you profess to stand for middle way and non-violence but you are filled with internal violence.you have a violent will and your violence is manifested in your intolerant attitude towards fellow tibetans who dont share same opinion and views.

  208. Dawa | May 5th, 2013 | 12:05 pm

    #204
    It’s unfortunate that even in Switzerland there are people who resort to threats in the midst of debates. Looks like you need to go out of your house and get used to the idea that it’s the 21st century. And we live in a civil democratic society where you can’t bully and beat up people whose views are different from yours.
    Its sad Rangzen has become so unpalatable to you. But I am quite sure Rangzen is not crying over losing support of human invertebrates such as yourselves.

  209. Luktse | May 5th, 2013 | 2:21 pm

    It is getting to be bit stale to dismiss those who support for Rangzen as end goal because no ‘step by step’ solution has been offered. Samdhong Rinpoche in his retirement continues to take this position and is rallying up the mop to silence dissenting voices.

    The solutions offered to work within the ‘framework of the Chinese constitution” is infact more naive and is NOT a strategy. A total and complete abandonment of the Tibetan aspiration cannot be defined as a strategy.

    How many of those who advocate for Middle Way for the Tibetans in Tibet are willing to return to the Chinese province of Tibet?

    What is stopping those people from returning to Tibet that is already under the Chinese rule? It is not as if China is somehow preventing those from coming back? And if the solution that is offered is to change the Chinese system within the Chinese law and under their constitutional framework, shouldn’t those who advocate that go back and work within the system? How can one seek those changes by remaining outside the country?

    If the Tibetan Administration acknowledge that the issue of Tibet can be resolved within the context of the Chinese constitution and as part of China then China is right to object interference of the foreign governments on the domestic issues. These “domestics” problems will have to be resolved within the sphere of Chinese internal affairs.

    The battle for Tibet in the International arena should be left for the Rangzen Advocates.

  210. Luktse | May 5th, 2013 | 2:29 pm

    It is getting to be bit stale to dismiss those who support for Rangzen as end goal because “no step by step solution has been offered”. Samdhong Rinpoche even in his retirement continues to take this position and is rallying up the mob to silence dissenting voices. Mixing Goal with tactics is the source of these problems.

    The solutions offered to work within the ‘framework of the Chinese constitution” is infact more naive and is NOT a strategy. A total and complete abandonment of the Tibetan aspiration cannot be defined as a strategy.

    How many of those who advocate for Middle Way for the Tibetans in Tibet are willing to return to the Chinese province of Tibet?

    What is stopping those people from returning to Tibet that is already under the Chinese rule? It is not as if China is somehow preventing those from coming back? And if the solution that is offered is to change the Chinese system within the Chinese law and under their constitutional framework, shouldn’t those who advocate that go back and work within the system? How can one seek those changes by remaining outside the country?

    If the Tibetan Administration acknowledge that the issue of Tibet can be resolved within the context of the Chinese constitution and as part of China then China is right to object interference of the foreign governments on the domestic issues. These “domestics” problems will have to be resolved within the sphere of Chinese internal affairs.

    The battle for Tibet in the International arena should be left for the Rangzen Advocates.

  211. karma | May 5th, 2013 | 11:18 pm

    LUKTSE: Forget your dream of becoming sole international player on Tibet, just look around your nose where TYC is now struggling to survive. The upcoming 15th GBM is going to changes the fundamental basis of TYC. “Independence to MWA” which is as you rightly said mixing strategy with goal. To a staunch MWA supporter, this if done will be a blunder to the much delight to our enemies. Our moment will be weaken and Tibet will face untimely deaths.

  212. karma | May 6th, 2013 | 12:08 am

    When it comes JN’s behavior, we should pity and help him to over come than trying to outcast or hate or demonize. Firstly as a child he had militaristic-patriarchal-machostic up bringing under his father resulting an estranged relation with his father (Children brought under such family atmosphere will turn rebellious); Secondly, when in Dharamsla (CTA & Private Office) by seeing his potential, these organizations have tried to engage him by giving him various responsibility and trainings overtly or covertly which failed miserably. Thirdly as young Tibetan he was raised during the time when english is the most sought after language in Tibetan society. His public school sojourn brought home along with many aspects of english culture and literature which, many of admire, became his core source of values than Tibetan culture. He used to lead a Irish gypsy lifestyle amidst Tibetan Dharamsala. In addition to this, also as compare to many of his friends and relatives, got Tibetan women to get married. He found none to give him that missing link.

  213. Tashi | May 6th, 2013 | 7:00 am

    Karma,really! now u are over boarding. Personal attacks on jn instead of expressing ur disagreement with jamyangnorbu.

    I still do not understand tibetan societies behavior. When u point out disagreement actions on somebody,that does not mean u r hating. C’mon, look at United States president, everyday he is scrutinized by citizens, lawyers, congress and of course journalist.

    The core cancer disease we have is, we always brings the name of hhdl or cta to credit our messages.
    I am grateful for jn to bring out the dirty issues. He have chosen the other path, that is to stand up for the justice of people.
    Thank u jamyangnorbu la for ur bravery. I know it is not easy but u have the balls.
    Katrinchey.

  214. karma | May 6th, 2013 | 10:46 pm

    Tashi: I am not discrediting what he is and has done. I have no doubts the issues that he has tried to raise is credible nobody will have the gut to do it. But all what he says is not true; they are not well researched and depended hugely on his circle and often hearsay and opinion. Despite all criticism he would still do it, why? I was just trying to through some lights there. Neither I am defending CTA or any other office. Being in limelight on such issues, JN will be scrutinized all in all so that we can understand our public figures better.

  215. sangpo aku | May 7th, 2013 | 3:07 am

    I suggest all the readers to cultivate a mindset of the importance of indipendent judiciary system above all in a society. I beleive Jamyang La is fundamentaly trying to expose this without much success instead taking us most on the side track of denegration of HH the Dalai Lama. I beleive he is respectful of his holiness in his own way but the problem lies with majority of tibetan including myself whose respect and devotion toward H H the Dalai lama suffers from addiction disorder. We really need to distill our emotional connection to Dalai lama and bring it to a higher level and not leaving at crass emotional stuff. I know by experience we tibetan in general donot really appreciate the holiness of our constituition ( almost substituite with a charasmatic person ) it is much easier and tangibile. The problem is there will be no gaurantee that all the rulers will be of benign nature like so far in exile. so the constituition is only our sacred and faithful companion towards a civilised society now and in future. We really need to learn how to regard and respect the constituition as our devotion towards H H the Dalai Lama. Remind that the Dalai lama will come and go but the constituition will remain like a solid backbone. The rule of law is fundamental for a successful community hence let’s try to build that holiness of the constituition as far as we can. Now with this prelude in your mind and read the article probably you will get a different point of view. Finally my earnest request to Jamyang La is to avoid those sublime slight ‘masala’ here and there at specific person ( unless and until highly neccessity ) because in my opinion these emotional triggering fators lead us to totally different track and finished in a closed circuit.

  216. Respect | May 15th, 2013 | 3:41 pm

    After reading all the comments, I would like to remind everyone, as Norsang (17) pointed out, “If those brave ones and martyrs in Tibet voiced and voice for full independence, why (do) we distort them? They know far better than us.”
    The self-immolators called out for independence as well as the return of His Holiness to Tibet.
    What right does ANYONE have to ignore their voices?
    But I see that many only remember that they called out for the return of HH. A half-truth is the same as a lie.
    I particularly found very interesting the comments of Sayadruk (83), who stated, “if we were to stifle free speech and dissenting views on some flimsy grounds, how is this any different from what the Chinese authorities are doing in the name of hurting the stability of their society or whatever they call it.” and Dawa (61), who wrote “if you get upset and wish to shut him (JN) up with personal attacks and emotional black mails like “upsetting Kundun” and other flimsy reasoning then look into your self and think put these questions to yourself: “Do I sound like the Red Guards?.”
    I think one comment that requires much further discussion is that of Luktse (209):
    “…How many of those who advocate for Middle Way for the Tibetans in Tibet are willing to return to the Chinese province of Tibet?
    What is stopping those people from returning to Tibet that is already under the Chinese rule? It is not as if China is somehow preventing those from coming back? And if the solution that is offered is to change the Chinese system within the Chinese law and under their constitutional framework, shouldn’t those who advocate that go back and work within the system? How can one seek those changes by remaining outside the country?
    If the Tibetan Administration acknowledge that the issue of Tibet can be resolved within the context of the Chinese constitution and as part of China then China is right to object interference of the foreign governments on the domestic issues. These “domestics” problems will have to be resolved within the sphere of Chinese internal affairs.
    The battle for Tibet in the International arena should be left for the Rangzen Advocates.”

    I would be really interested in knowing what people think about this comment.

  217. Gyamtso Kyab | May 17th, 2013 | 2:52 pm

    Thanks Maura for the telling piece which should I am prompted to post here for our readers.Kodos!

    Communist Tibet and the Death of Hope

    By Maura Moynihan
    Thursday, May 16, 20135 Comments.

    The recent Chinese military incursion into Ladakh was a painful reminder of the cost of losing Tibet. And this week Chinese officials announced plans to demolish what remains of Lhasa, Tibet’s ancient capital. Despite its inclusion in UNESCO’s World Heritage List, Lhasa is a symbol of Tibetan nationalism, and China’s Politburo has determined that Tibetan culture, religion and identity must been exterminated to ensure “stability.”

    On May 8th, the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington hosted an evening with Lobsang Sangay, the head of the Tibetan government in exile. Sangay addressed a gathering of journalists, academics and lawyers, eager to discuss the escalating crisis in Tibet. (The proceedings were recorded and the video is available online). Most in the audience anticipated a repudiation of Chinese Communist rule from the Harvard Law student, but what Sangay had to say sent shock waves through the room, and later, the blogosphere.

    When asked if he hoped to see free elections in a genuinely autonomous Tibet in the near future, Sangay replied; “We don’t challenge, or ask for, an overthrow of the Communist Party. We don’t question or challenge the present structure of the ruling party.” Jerome Cohen, the renown legal scholar from New York University, asked Sangay for clarification, stating; “It’s very interesting to see what this would amount to if there’s no freedom of speech for the people in Tibet.” Sangay provided clarification; “We are not asking for democracy for Tibetans in Tibet… we want rights as per the Chinese constitution.”

    The internet swelled with questions about Sangay’s remarks, in particular, his flouting of democracy for the people of Tibet and China, and his disregard for the Chinese intellectuals who bravely signed Charter 08, which calls for the rule of law, democratic reforms in China and criticized the Communist Party for “clinging to authoritarian politics, it has caused an unbroken chain of human rights disasters and social crises, held back the development of the Chinese people, and hindered the progress of human civilization.”

    To embrace Chinese Communist rule is to abandon the people inside Tibet who have waged a desperate battle of survival and resistance for over 60 years. Every man and woman who made the ultimate sacrifice of self immolation did so for independence, as their moving final testaments confirm. And it is in direct opposition to the stated goals of the Dalai Lama, who purposefully modeled his exile government on India’s democracy, not Mao’s one party dictatorship. When the Dalai Lama proposed the Middle Way Policy in 1988, he conceived of preserving Tibet as a buffer state and a de-militarized “zone of peace.” Sangay’s stated position eviscerates the relevance of the Tibet movement, and depreciates India’s burden of a long, tense border with an increasingly bellicose China.

    There were Indian journalists present at the Council on Foreign Relations that evening, but none asked Sangay any tough or serious questions. When the matter of the recent Ladakh incursion was raised, Sangay blithely said that China’s military positions at the Indian border should be at “China’s discretion.” Excuse me, but Sangay resides in Dharamshala, and has recently been provided with a special vehicle with a red light on top, to indicate his VIP status in Himachal Pradesh. One would assume that these privileges come at South Block’s discretion.

    There are some features of pre-communist Tibetan political culture that Sangay is actively deploying to build his myth; his official Facebook page declares that he is a “secular emanation” of the Dalai Lama and Guru Rinpoche. And at the Council in Washington he said; “Many artists inside Tibet have composed songs in honor of the election and my victory and they have put it on YouTube with English translation. Some have sent me scrolls where normally we put deities and gods and goddesses, only they have put a picture of me and that’s being distributed.” This would be risible if not for the mounting death toll in Tibet, and that Tibet’s ancient civilization is being destroyed by the day, as bulldozers tear into the holy Jokhang temple in Lhasa.

    Beijing’s cadres are unwilling, or unable, to relinquish one party rule, as they cling to an obsolete Maoist world view that demonizes the Dalai Lama and calls the Buddhist faith “a disease to be eradicated.” That Tibetan culture is a force that so petrifies the great People’s Republic of China exposes the xenophobia, intolerance, and violence that infects the Maoist creed. Sangay’s categorical rejection of democracy in favor of Communist rule in Tibet could be a cynical power play, or maybe he thinks might makes right, and that power does come from the barrel of a gun, but then, how can he proclaim himself a secular emanation of Avalokiteshvara, the Bodhisattva of Compassion, protector of Tibet?

    Chester Bowles, the venerable United States Ambassador to India, published a memoir in 1969 entitled “A View from New Delhi.” Here is an excerpt: “Whereas India tried to dignify the individual as part of the process of development, China regarded him as an instrument of the state…whereas India sought to preserve and enrich her ancient culture and to modernize her society within the context of her traditions, Communist China attempted to replace the traditional Chinese culture and institutions with a completely new and alien social system. While India tried to minimize the amount of social dislocation caused by the development process, China sought to maximize it…While the Chinese were sure they could interpret the future, the Indian government has remained sensibly agnostic. Where the Chinese system has cracked under adversity, the Indian has simply bent…the long-suffering, exploited Chinese peasants and workers must be wondering how long the horror can go on, while they hope for the day when at long last they can be free of the shifting whims of a communist dictatorship.”

    Popularity:

  218. SeekTruthLearnHistory | May 17th, 2013 | 5:27 pm

    Thanks a million Maura Moynihan.

    I think this Torjan Horse is just trying to out do His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Samdhong Rinpoche with his Chinese master. Now, let us call him His Holiness Sikyong Lobsang Sangay. For this holiness, he will even sell his mom if China dangles trains of sexy women and pads of notes.

    I can assure him this that if he wants to return to China’s Tibet, we will at least give him a decent see off. If he choose nge-shu -gu ( 29th of last month of Tibetan calender, assigned for house-cleaning and dispatching the evils away. Explanation of our inji friends.) better will be our send off.

  219. tsedor | May 22nd, 2013 | 5:16 am

    Mr. Jamyang Norbu,

    its indeed nice to read your lengthy article on the title given to a person who is working for smooth solving of Tibet cause.

    but i see no point in what you have try to point out… frankly speaking, its waste of time for you to involve such issue.

    rather it would be really encouraging if you research in the chinese leadership trend… and make some constructive criticism that can help both the tibetans and chinese as well.

    keeping you on track..!

    tsedor

  220. Kesnorbu | June 10th, 2013 | 6:09 am

    Thank you Jamyang la for being Liberal as our society really needs it. I was always a great admirer of your works, blogs and articles no matter how offensive it sometimes is. I really appreciate your courage to speak freely despite living in a very closed and theocratic society. I am sure our generation will always support you! As a Tibetan everybody regards HIS HOLINESS as their DEAR religious leader and LS as respected elected leader of Tibetan people. And every single Tibetan has a right to put their views whether it’s against state (CTA) or for. We need to analyse and research and not follow blindly or in blind faith. We all have read Gedun Choephel la’s fate for being so liberal (when Tibet was not occupied by China) and which I think it’s all because of ignorance and blind faith but we should never let this happen to Jamyang Norbu la. He is true thinker, philosopher and true son of Tibet! We really need more liberal thinkers like Jayang la to bring in change to our society which is still at its infancy stage!

    Pls keep more coming JN la. Best wishes

    Kesnorbu

  221. Gyamtso Kyab | July 14th, 2013 | 1:01 pm

    VII THE WAY FORWARD

    As stated at the beginning of this memorandum, our intention is to explore how the needs of the Tibetan nationality can be met within the framework of PRC since we believe these needs are consistent with the principles of the Constitution on autonomy. As His Holiness the Dalai Lama stated on a number of occasions, we have no hidden agenda. We have no intention at all of using any agreement on genuine autonomy as stepping stone for separation from the PRC.

    The objective of the Tibetan Government in Exile is to represent the interests of the Tibetan people and to speak on their behalf. Therefore, it will no longer be needed and will be dissolved once an agreement is reached between us. In fact, His Holiness has reiterated his decision not to accept any political office in Tibet at any time in the future. His Holiness the Dalai Lama, nevertheless, plans to use all his personal influence to ensure such an agreement would have the legitimacy necessary to obtain the support of the Tibetan people.

    Given these strong commitments, we propose that the next step in this process be the agreement to start serious discussions on the points raised in this memorandum. For this purpose we propose that we discuss and agree

  222. Gyamtso Kyab | July 14th, 2013 | 2:43 pm

    Front and Center
    The posting of the so-called Memorandum for Tibetan Autonomy prompted me to write this:
    Skip to the fake end of the memo, and you will find the last section Seven called The Way Forward. It claims, “our intention is to explore how the needs of the Tibetan people nationality can be met within the frame work of PRC since we beleive these needs are consistent with the principles of the Constitution on autonomy.” It invokes the Dalai Lama’s often repeated slogan that we have no hidden agenda. Look what happened or not happened.
    In order to shake or shape China’s view point, I urge that the rights and freedom of the Tibetan people and not the needs of the Tibetan nationality. Human needs are unlimited, and not even super powers can fulfill the desires and needs of it people. But basic rights freedom are limited an stipulated and are mandatory. What can one expect from China when our demands are not defined. Visit any free country’s constitution, and the rights and demands are defined.
    Perhaps it shows our own lack of respect for rights and freedom. Although the exile Tibetan community functions under the facade of democracy, any expect or suspecting civil body or individuals will sadly agree that democracy is not fully practised. While on can understand why common Tibetans even today, after 60 years of living in free societies, cannot accept democractic expression leave any action, even the Tibetan pontiff himself, has failed, more than once, to accept dissenting voice within a elite Tibetan. The great majortiy of the Tibetans, educated and uneducated, prefer to swallow the Dalai Lama’s dictums rather than accept the rule of laws and democracy. and the free exercise of human rights, including but not limited to free speech an assembly. How can one forget the Dalai Lama lambasting the senior law maker who dared to comment about the Dalai Lama’s ultimate aim behind the so-called Middle Way Approach. Remember, the Radio Free episode where free fresh was attacked much to the disgust of not only passive Tibetans, but many American lawmakers. The RFA is turmoil is are from over although it has installed a new director; but there is no sign things are improving. The sad saga continues with full and explicit blessing of CATA and the Dalai Lama himself. No mincing words! My sources claim that Kalden Lodoe is now being called the emmisary of the Gaden Phadrang and is taking the shorts past the new director. The interim director has replaced the former deputy director, and the duputy is now new title:Senior Advisor of sorts. The senior edito’rs pot now open has become of born of contention. I heard the post will be declared open for internal application. But lately, there is silence. and now there are rumors that Kalden Lodoe or his remaining cham (name not known) will get the post. So look for fore trouble there.
    Remember Skikong Lobsang Sangay’s strange remaks at a recent hearing in Washington DC that has sent a chilling and shocking message which has bewildered many. If freedom, democracy, Communism, real autonomy, are not needed, then what is the fight for after all. Is it what the Dalai Lama stipulated in his Middle Way Approach? One can assume the beginning of dissent and rift between CTA and the Gaden Phodrang. Did any one sense it! I hear rumors are afloat that the Dalai Lama has voiced his concerns about the Sikyong’s commitment to follow the appeasement policy . I hoped someone will pen what the Dalai Lama reportedly told Samdhong’s ex-students’ gathering in Dalhousie. Hope someone will dare of share what transpired.
    Let it be known that the Middle Way Approach is fast losing its hold on the Tibetan community in exile. The current efforts to demonize TYC and Rangzen advocates from the highest in power will whiter with time. And lets remind ourselves that the concept of Middle Way was never accepted by the Tibetans in Tibet. On the contrary they have challenged it by self-immolating themselves at the alter of Rangzen. Tell me who , if any, is advocating the Middle Way Approach in Tibet.
    The only hope for the Middle Way Approach is have any legitimacy is to accept and use the Rangzen advocacy as a tool to its benefits. Alter, if there is anything that will force the Chinese to talk, it is the Rangzen plateform and nothing else.

  223. Tenzin | August 30th, 2013 | 7:45 am

    Too much politics going on here.

  224. sonam norbu | October 6th, 2013 | 3:40 am

    Dear JN. I am a Tibetan student in India.I believe that you are a very patriotic and staunch Tibetan intellectual.I admire you in many ways but some questions always intrigues me …if jamyang norbu cares and write so much about Tibet and its independent…..why he just don’t come to Gangchen kyishong and work for it ? Why he lives in comfortable way criticize those people and institution who are really working hard?
    Why he always criticize his own side and forget the foe ?

  225. sonam norbu | October 6th, 2013 | 3:41 am

    Dear JN. I am a Tibetan student in India.I believe that you are a very patriotic and staunch Tibetan intellectual.I admire you in many ways but some questions always intrigues me …if jamyang norbu cares and write so much about Tibet and its independent…..why he just don’t come to Gangchen kyishong and work for it ? Why he lives in comfortable way criticize those people and institution who are really working hard?
    Why he always criticize his own side and forget the foe ?

    Your’s sincerely
    Sonam norbu ,gopalpur.

  226. Norbu | October 11th, 2013 | 11:50 am

    This is the result when we elect a PM who has no experience to run CTA. It should be never repeated in the future, if we have learnt anything.

  227. Karze | October 11th, 2013 | 9:43 pm

    @225: NJ has worked most of his professional life within CTA from Mustang to Dharamsala. Moreover, you don’t need to be in Dharamsala to work for Tibetan cause.

    Moreover, JN is not fresh college graduate who moved to US but an aged scholar who has spend his most adult years working directly in Tibetan community. Now even though is not employed by CTA he is still working for Tibetan cause for pro bono. Can you site a single Tibetan who is working like JN without pay check. There are so many Tibetan who even don’t spend single day for Tibetan cause like March 10 protest etc.

  228. Deep Throat | October 12th, 2013 | 5:58 am

    Sonam Norbu-la @ 224:

    The fact that you as a student came on JN’s blog and read and joined the discussion shows that you are smart, open-minded and ahead of your class.

    It bodes well for future of Tibet. Please encourage more of your friends to come and read the discussion.

    Now I will tell you this. I work for CTA but I will say this: JN has done more for Tibet than many of us working here in Gangchen Kyishong.

    I came to serve Dharamsala, inspired by JN’s book ” Horsemen in the Snow ” You should find and read. It is about a Khampa Warrior named Nyarong Aten. I am not a Khampa, but I am doing my part for Tibet.

    Since there is so much self-censorship in many of main stream Tibetan media, this blog is very important for even many of the Gangkyi staff .

    I will also say on close observation, some of the issues written about, by the participants on this blog were picked up by some Chithues. I observed that in some of member’s question. This shows many chithues are reading the blog. Don’t get it wrong, questioner is not Chithue Karma Choephel.

    JN has a huge following that even JN can not fathom and it is growing. It is a human nature. When you attack some one for the wrong reason, people naturally have empathy, even secretly.

    I will tell give you an example, certain states in India have ” dry day” – the day on which sale of alcohol is banned. But hotel managers and restaurant owners will tell you that their sale of alcohol is best during the ” dry -day.”

    I am coming here to drink for Tibet, because CTA has closed other shops from discussing about future of Tibet, other than living as Chinese slaves.

    Sikyong has his own agenda. He thinks he is fine as long as he could get the seat of Ngabo Ngawang Jigme. ( Remember, wanting to be China’s Obama.”

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